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Stealth Fighter

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WORLD
January 9, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates warned Saturday that China's development of advanced missiles and a new stealth fighter could endanger U.S. naval and air forces, and he said the Pentagon would "respond appropriately. " 4 a.m. update: U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates has arrived in Beijing. "They clearly have the potential to put some of our capabilities at risk, and we have to pay attention to them. We have to respond appropriately with our own programs," Gates told reporters as he traveled to Beijing for three days of talks with senior Chinese leaders.
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OPINION
September 25, 2012
Re "The last dance," Sept. 22 I have been struck by the outpouring of positive emotion over Endeavour's final flight. I wish the space shuttle could have flown over every major American city, sparking patriotism for some peaceful national goal that supersedes politics. People of all political stripes are sick of all the negative energy and want to believe in what has made our country the envy of the world. We need another national goal to re-dedicate our imagination to the evolution of mankind.
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NEWS
October 5, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
In a political drama that peaked Tuesday in Washington, the Pentagon abruptly shelved plans to unveil details of its super-secret stealth fighter plane because of angry objections about its possible impact on national security and on the presidential race. According to congressional sources, the planned press briefing on the radar-eluding jet had received a powerful push from Vice President George Bush's campaign, as well as from the reelection campaign of Republican Sen.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2011
Northrop Grumman Corp., headquartered in Century City, is a conglomeration of nearly two dozen military and aerospace companies, including TRW, Litton and Westinghouse — most of them acquired in the last two decades. 1939: John K. "Jack" Northrop forms a namesake military-aircraft-making company in Hawthorne. He builds its first aircraft, the N-3PB patrol bomber, in 1940. 1946: Jack Northrop designs and builds the first XB-35 flying wing, which would be the basis for the development of the radar-evading B-2 stealth bomber more than 40 years later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A United Airlines passenger plane was forced to avoid an Air Force stealth fighter shortly after takeoff from Los Angeles on Thursday. The Boeing 757, bound for Boston, was climbing to cruising altitude and was at 10,800 feet when the pilot told officials that he was in a direct path with a "stealth-type military aircraft," said Jerry Snyder, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.
WORLD
January 7, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
A few weeks ago, grainy photos surfaced online showing what several prominent defense analysts said appeared to be a prototype of a Chinese stealth fighter jet that could compete with the best of America's warplanes, years ahead of U.S. predictions. Days later, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet disclosed that a long-awaited Chinese anti-ship missile, designed to sink an American aircraft carrier, was nearly operational. As Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates heads to China this weekend, analysts are expressing concern about Chinese military advances, which appear to have taken the U.S. by surprise.
WORLD
January 12, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
China's military conducted the first flight test of an experimental stealth fighter Tuesday, apparently without informing the country's civilian leadership in advance and only hours before U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates met with the Chinese president to discuss ways of improving military ties. The test flight of the J-20 fighter seemed to represent a snub of Gates by China's military establishment during his three-day visit to Beijing and to deepen questions about how much control the country's civilian leadership exercises over the armed forces, which have often taken a harder line on improving relations with the United States.
NEWS
September 8, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lockheed Martin's F-22 Raptor stealth fighter was taken on its maiden test flight, spending an hour in the air at speeds up to 285 mph. "If you can fly a Cessna 150, you can fly this airplane," said test pilot Paul Metz, referring to the common civilian craft. The Air Force is scheduled to get 339 of the planes to replace the F-15C, currently its top fighter, at a cost of $43 billion.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
An Air Force plane that Pentagon sources said was a top-secret stealth fighter crashed Wednesday night, killing its pilot, officials said Thursday. A Pentagon official who asked not to be named described the plane as a stealth fighter, similar to a plane that crashed in California last year. The source refused to discuss the conditions under which the plane crashed and it could not be learned immediately whether the plane was on a training exercise or a flight test.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon, breaking a silence that has prevailed since the Jimmy Carter Administration, Thursday announced the existence of the stealth fighter jet and released a murky photo of the bat-like aircraft, which has flown for seven years under cover of darkness and amid official secrecy. The Air Force confirmed that it has bought 52 of the science fiction-like craft, dubbed the F-117A, and acknowledged that three of the fighters have crashed since the first one flew in 1981.
WORLD
January 12, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
China's military conducted the first flight test of an experimental stealth fighter Tuesday, apparently without informing the country's civilian leadership in advance and only hours before U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates met with the Chinese president to discuss ways of improving military ties. The test flight of the J-20 fighter seemed to represent a snub of Gates by China's military establishment during his three-day visit to Beijing and to deepen questions about how much control the country's civilian leadership exercises over the armed forces, which have often taken a harder line on improving relations with the United States.
WORLD
January 9, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates warned Saturday that China's development of advanced missiles and a new stealth fighter could endanger U.S. naval and air forces, and he said the Pentagon would "respond appropriately. " 4 a.m. update: U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates has arrived in Beijing. "They clearly have the potential to put some of our capabilities at risk, and we have to pay attention to them. We have to respond appropriately with our own programs," Gates told reporters as he traveled to Beijing for three days of talks with senior Chinese leaders.
WORLD
January 7, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
A few weeks ago, grainy photos surfaced online showing what several prominent defense analysts said appeared to be a prototype of a Chinese stealth fighter jet that could compete with the best of America's warplanes, years ahead of U.S. predictions. Days later, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet disclosed that a long-awaited Chinese anti-ship missile, designed to sink an American aircraft carrier, was nearly operational. As Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates heads to China this weekend, analysts are expressing concern about Chinese military advances, which appear to have taken the U.S. by surprise.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2008 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Not everyone missed out on Tuesday's top-secret passing of one of the world's most mysterious aircraft. Gareth Goetz, an Anaheim mortgage broker, was one of 100 cheering aviation buffs who gathered in Palmdale at a makeshift viewing spot just outside the gates of Lockheed Martin Corp.'s defense plant.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
If you're going to steal, you might as well steal big. "Stealth" has pilfered from "Top Gun," "2001: A Space Odyssey" and a few other places to produce a slick piece of summer entertainment that is counting on elaborate special effects to make its derivative, convoluted story line all but irrelevant.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Pentagon panel has approved starting limited production of the U.S. Air Force's controversial F-22 jet fighter despite acknowledging that costs were exceeding projections and that fewer jets could eventually be built. The Defense Department panel, in an eagerly awaited decision, told the Air Force that it could begin initial production of 10 F-22s for $2.1 billion, but that the planned number of planes would have to be reduced to 295 from 333.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | From The Associated Press
One of America's worst-kept military secrets, the F-117A Stealth fighter, was unveiled Saturday to a crowd of thousands who cheered a demonstration flight by two of the multimillion-dollar aircraft. The two bat-shaped planes swept in under a thin cloud cover and passed over Nellis Air Force Base, banked sharply against the Las Vegas skyline and landed to give the public its first close-up of the once top-secret aircraft. There was an eerie whine as the lead craft, piloted by Capt.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | JAMES F. PELTZ and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Maybe the U.S. Stealth fighter that crashed during NATO strikes over Yugoslavia suffered mechanical failure. Maybe it was hit by Serbian air defenses that just got lucky. Maybe it went down because of pilot error. But what if the F-117A Nighthawk crashed because the Serbs penetrated the jet's stealth, or radar-evading, design technology? That's a chilling scenario for many, because the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2001 | TIMOTHY HUGHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaning against a chain-link fence at the Point Mugu Air Show, Tom Conforti gazed skyward as an F-4 Phantom roared overhead, no higher than a high-rise office building. "It's great to be around so much firepower," said Conforti of Camarillo, feeling the bone-rattling vibration and smelling the jet fuel. "You can feel the bass and it goes right through you." While gray, misty weather grounded the Air Force Thunderbirds precision-flying team, tens of thousands of spectators sipped coffee, sat in the cockpit of a Navy transport plane and gaped at a Stealth fighter surrounded by stern military guards wearing black berets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A United Airlines passenger plane was forced to avoid an Air Force stealth fighter shortly after takeoff from Los Angeles on Thursday. The Boeing 757, bound for Boston, was climbing to cruising altitude and was at 10,800 feet when the pilot told officials that he was in a direct path with a "stealth-type military aircraft," said Jerry Snyder, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.
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