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Stealth Fighter Airplane

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NEWS
September 29, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
With his top-secret Stealth fighter prototype crippled and running out of fuelover the Nevada desert, experimental test pilot William C. Park grasped the aircraft's ejection-seat ring and pulled hard. As the seat exploded out of the aircraft, it bashed Park's head against the headrest and knocked him unconscious. Although his parachute deployed, his limp body struck hard against the desert floor, breaking his leg, cracking a vertebra and filling his mouth with dirt.
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NATIONAL
February 19, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The F-117A fighter jet, the radar-eluding plane known for its angular design and charcoal color, may be getting a makeover in gray. The U.S. Air Force has painted one of its stealth fighters at Holloman Air Force Base in Albuquerque to see if the plane called the Nighthawk might be harder to spot when it flies during daylight hours in a color other than black.
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NEWS
December 24, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The F-117A Stealth fighter, an aircraft whose existence was a secret until last year, was used in combat for the first time in Panama, slipping past air defenses to bomb a key installation of the Panama Defense Forces, military sources said Saturday. Flying in formation out of their base at Tonopah Test Range in Nevada, about six of the radar-evading aircraft swooped over Panama under cover of darkness Tuesday night, senior Pentagon officials said.
WORLD
March 21, 2003 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Shutters clicked and the crowd surged forward to get a better look at the Stealth F-117 fighter jet displayed in all its black, bat-winged glory on the runway of the U.S. Air Force base here. "Wow," exclaimed a young South Korean airman as he caught his first glimpse of the famed fighter. No doubt about it, the Stealth bomber, with angles as sharp as a Cubist painting, is designed to impress and, some might say, intimidate.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lockheed F-117A Stealth fighter, invisible to enemy radar, disappeared Tuesday from the 1992 federal budget as well. A House-Senate conference committee failed to appropriate $560 million to restart production of the jet, reversing an effort led by Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) in the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon, breaking a silence that has prevailed since the Jimmy Carter Administration, Thursday announced the existence of the stealth fighter jet and released a murky photo of the bat-like aircraft, which has flown for seven years under cover of darkness and amid official secrecy. The Air Force confirmed that it has bought 52 of the science fiction-like craft, dubbed the F-117A, and acknowledged that three of the fighters have crashed since the first one flew in 1981.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The F-117A fighter jet, the radar-eluding plane known for its angular design and charcoal color, may be getting a makeover in gray. The U.S. Air Force has painted one of its stealth fighters at Holloman Air Force Base in Albuquerque to see if the plane called the Nighthawk might be harder to spot when it flies during daylight hours in a color other than black.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Defense Department is expected to announce today that it has awarded a seven-year, $2-billion contract to Lockheed Martin's Skunk Works for maintenance of the F-117 Stealth fighter. The Palmdale division, which created the warplane, will be responsible for "logistics support, sustainment engineering, material management, technical data and depot repair," according to an award notification issued by the Air Force.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent outgrowth of the Persian Gulf War, a key Senate subcommittee has unexpectedly voted to restart production of Lockheed's F-117A Stealth fighter. Lockheed shares climbed sharply Wednesday after a Senate Armed Services Committee panel voted to buy 24 of the fighters, which went out of production in 1990.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After less than two weeks of U.S. military action in Iraq, the nation's political leaders are already drawing some firm conclusions about how Congress should revamp the defense budget to capitalize on the success of America's high-tech weaponry. The problem is that all of them are different. Vice President Dan Quayle says the war so far demonstrates the continued need for the Strategic Defense Initiative, known informally as "Star Wars." Rep. Norm Dicks (D-Wash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A United Airlines passenger plane was forced to avoid an Air Force stealth fighter shortly after takeoff from Los Angeles on Thursday. The Boeing 757, bound for Boston, was climbing to cruising altitude and was at 10,800 feet when the pilot told officials that he was in a direct path with a "stealth-type military aircraft," said Jerry Snyder, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
All last week, President Clinton took pains to warn Americans that his decision to intervene in the Kosovo conflict could send some U.S. pilots to their deaths. "This action is not risk-free," Clinton said Wednesday as U.S. and allied forces launched their first airstrikes against Yugoslavia. "However, I have concluded that the dangers of acting now are clearly outweighed by the risks of failing to act."
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. forces staged a stunning rescue of a downed American pilot early today, six hours after his F-117A Stealth fighter crashed during NATO airstrikes over Yugoslavia, the Pentagon said. "I am happy to report the pilot has been rescued and is safe at an allied base," Defense Department spokesman Kenneth H. Bacon said at the Pentagon. "He and the combat search-and-rescue team that picked him up are all safe."
BUSINESS
October 2, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Defense Department is expected to announce today that it has awarded a seven-year, $2-billion contract to Lockheed Martin's Skunk Works for maintenance of the F-117 Stealth fighter. The Palmdale division, which created the warplane, will be responsible for "logistics support, sustainment engineering, material management, technical data and depot repair," according to an award notification issued by the Air Force.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | From the Washington Post
At a loss to explain the spectacular air show crash Sunday of an F-117A in a Baltimore suburb, the Air Force on Monday grounded its fleet of stealth jet fighters until investigators can provide some clues about what went wrong. Military officials said the probe was focusing on the aircraft's left wing, parts of which broke away moments before the plane plummeted to the ground. "This is one we've certainly never seen before," said Brig. Gen. Dennis R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lt. Col. Steven A. Green was doused with buckets of ice water, covered with fire extinguisher spray and offered champagne straight from the bottle--it's how pilots celebrate an aviation milestone. During a 20-minute training flight Tuesday morning, Green became the first pilot to log 1,000 hours in the F-117, better known as the stealth fighter. "This flight was as exciting as the first one," said a drenched Green, 42, after landing the fighter at Air Force Plant 42. "It never gets old for me."
BUSINESS
October 11, 1988 | GREG BRAXTON, Times Staff Writer
Lockheed Corp. employees who work in classified areas in Burbank soon will be surveyed by their union on whether they have experienced severe health problems due to exposure to chemicals used in top-secret projects. The survey, which will be conducted by the International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, is in response to charges that some workers believed to be assembling Stealth fighter planes have become sick or died from exposure to dangerous chemicals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A United Airlines passenger plane was forced to avoid an Air Force stealth fighter shortly after takeoff from Los Angeles on Thursday. The Boeing 757, bound for Boston, was climbing to cruising altitude and was at 10,800 feet when the pilot told officials that he was in a direct path with a "stealth-type military aircraft," said Jerry Snyder, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for Time Warner Inc., a federal judge in Los Angeles has dismissed a lawsuit brought by a screenwriter who alleged that the entertainment conglomerate turned his script about the hijacking of a nuclear-armed Stealth bomber into a novel written by another author. U.S. District Judge James M.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | BARTON GELLMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Two of the most celebrated weapons of the Persian Gulf War, the Air Force F-117A Stealth attack jet and the Navy Tomahawk cruise missile, struck considerably fewer of their targets than military officials have asserted publicly, according to the most recent classified analysis.
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