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Stealth Fighter Airplane

NEWS
September 15, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Air Force F-117A stealth fighter that was performing for crowds at an air show in a Baltimore suburb crashed Sunday into two houses on a Chesapeake Bay marina, injuring six people on the ground. Pentagon spokesman Ken Bacon said the F-117A's pilot, later identified as Capt. Bryan Knight, ejected safely and was treated for minor injuries at the scene of the crash near the Glenn Martin State Airport in Middle River, Md.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lt. Col. Steven A. Green was doused with buckets of ice water, covered with fire extinguisher spray and offered champagne straight from the bottle--it's how pilots celebrate an aviation milestone. During a 20-minute training flight Tuesday morning, Green became the first pilot to log 1,000 hours in the F-117, better known as the stealth fighter. "This flight was as exciting as the first one," said a drenched Green, 42, after landing the fighter at Air Force Plant 42. "It never gets old for me."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for Time Warner Inc., a federal judge in Los Angeles has dismissed a lawsuit brought by a screenwriter who alleged that the entertainment conglomerate turned his script about the hijacking of a nuclear-armed Stealth bomber into a novel written by another author. U.S. District Judge James M.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | BARTON GELLMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Two of the most celebrated weapons of the Persian Gulf War, the Air Force F-117A Stealth attack jet and the Navy Tomahawk cruise missile, struck considerably fewer of their targets than military officials have asserted publicly, according to the most recent classified analysis.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed's iconoclastic Skunk Works has routinely churned out the world's most exotic and innovative aircraft during the last four decades, defying the conventions of the Pentagon bureaucracy along the way. The credo of the Burbank operation has been to work quickly, quietly and with the most advanced technology in aerospace--yielding such breakthroughs as the F-117A stealth fighter, which had pinpoint bombing accuracy during the Persian Gulf War.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lockheed F-117A Stealth fighter, invisible to enemy radar, disappeared Tuesday from the 1992 federal budget as well. A House-Senate conference committee failed to appropriate $560 million to restart production of the jet, reversing an effort led by Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) in the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a windfall for Lockheed Corp. that seemed improbable until this week, a House-Senate conference committee authorized restarting production of the firm's F-117A Stealth fighter and provided $560 million for four of the jets in the 1992 defense budget. The new F-117 production would represent one of the few respites from the relentless budget cutbacks that have afflicted Southern California's distressed aerospace industry.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent outgrowth of the Persian Gulf War, a key Senate subcommittee has unexpectedly voted to restart production of Lockheed's F-117A Stealth fighter. Lockheed shares climbed sharply Wednesday after a Senate Armed Services Committee panel voted to buy 24 of the fighters, which went out of production in 1990.
NEWS
June 19, 1991 | Reuters
Gen. Oldrich Barak said Tuesday that his country has developed a defense system capable of detecting the radar-avoiding U.S. Stealth aircraft from a greater distance than any other device. Barak, head of the military ordnance and technology service, told the newspaper Rude Pravo that "the system can identify the craft, its position and altitude," even at a distance of 250 miles.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon has reduced its order for Advanced Tactical Fighters by 100 planes, with the 21st-Century aircraft now expected to cost a total of $95 billion, Air Force officials told Congress on Monday. In a surprise announcement, the Air Force director of tactical programs said the pending cutback of overall military forces warranted reducing the ATF order to 650 planes.
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