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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Ken Bensinger
In March 2004, an attorney for Southern California Edison sat before state utility regulators to propose what seemed like a great deal. The San Onofre nuclear plant was approaching the end of its life span. But Edison wanted to invest $680 million in new steam generators, attorney Carol Schmid-Frazee told a judge presiding over a hearing at the California Public Utilities Commission's San Francisco headquarters. The new equipment, she said, would give the 2,200-megawatt plant a new lease on life, providing cheap, reliable energy in Southern California for decades to come while also saving ratepayers nearly $2 billion.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Electricity customers in Southern California would receive $1.4 billion in refunds on their bills over the next eight years as part of an agreement between two utilities and ratepayer organizations over the closing of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. The proposed settlement, announced Thursday, still needs approval from the California Public Utilities Commission. Both ratepayer advocates and executives at Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. said they were satisfied with the deal.
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OPINION
February 10, 2013
If what two federal lawmakers say is true, there's more to the shutdown at the San Onofre nuclear plant than the public has been told. According to Sens. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) and Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.), a leaked internal report by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, which manufactured the problem-riddled steam generators that forced the shutdown, indicates that concerns about the generators' design were raised before they were even installed but that only minimal fixes were made. Southern California Edison, which owns the plant, denies this, which leaves ratepayers and the public in the dark.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
Southern California Edison fired another salvo at its former contractor, demanding that Mitsubishi Heavy Industries pay it $140 million for the cost of investigating the failure of steam generators at the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Edison on Tuesday released a Sept. 27 letter that accused Mitsubishi of "stonewalling" by continuing to seek more documentation about the cost of the utility's probes. "Your letter makes clear that Mitsubishi has no intention of meeting its contractual obligations to reimburse expenses incurred as a result of the defective replacement steam generators," Edison wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2013 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Southern California Edison, the operator of the troubled San Onofre nuclear power plant, pushed back against two federal lawmakers who said that the utility company was aware of defects in the plant's replacement steam generators before they were installed. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) and Rep. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) sent a letter to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission this week saying that a leaked report from steam generator manufacturer Mitsubishi Heavy Industries showed that Edison and Mitsubishi knew of problems with the design.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2013 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
In response to a complaint filed by a former San Diego city attorney, an administrative judge with the California Public Utilities Commission has given Southern California Edison a March 15 deadline to file an accounting of its costs to replace steam generators at the San Onofre nuclear plant. The commission did not agree, however, to immediately stop collecting funds from ratepayers for the project. Problems with the replacement steam generators - installed in 2010 and 2011 - led to a shutdown of the plant that has stretched on for more than a year.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Water and Power Department has discovered what a number of utilities have learned: It's cheaper and faster to rebuild than to replace. The department is in the midst of a 10-year, $11.6-million project to completely overhaul the 35-year-old Unit B-1 steam generator, one of three at the Broadway Steam Plant next to the Pasadena Freeway on Glenarm Street. The B-1 unit, built in 1955, was scheduled to be shut down this year. But Pasadena has decided instead to keep it going for 25 more years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2013 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Southern California Edison was aware of problems with replacement steam generators at its San Onofre nuclear power plant but chose not to make fixes, U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer charged Wednesday. Boxer cited a leaked report from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the manufacturer of the steam generators, obtained by her office. It is the first indication from government officials that Edison and Mitsubishi knew the system had problems before it was even installed. The nuclear plant, a prime supplier of power in Southern California, has been off line for more than a year after a small amount of radioactive steam leaked from the plant's tubing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
A year ago, Southern California Edison announced the installation of four new steam generators at the San Onofre nuclear power plant, hailing it as a major boost to electricity production. The $671-million generators, which will be paid for by rate increases to Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric customers, were supposed to save ratepayers $1 billion over the next decade and extend the life of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. But for the last two months, San Onofre has been shut down after officials discovered problems in the generators' heat transfer tubes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
The problems at the San Onofre nuclear power plant are serious enough that the facility will not be able to operate at full capacity when it reopens, perhaps as early as June. The announcement comes as officials continue to investigate problems in the reactors that have forced the plant to remain shut for three months, the longest closure in San Onofre's history. Southern California Edison estimated that the company's cost for inspections and repairs at the plant would be between $55 million and $65 million.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Federal regulators have issued proposed safety violation citations to Southern California Edison Co. and its contractor for alleged design flaws in steam generators at the San Onofre nuclear power plant. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Monday released the results of an inspection into the failures that led to Edison's decision in June to shutter two units at the electricity generating station near San Clemente. In January of 2012, steam tubes in one of the units began to leak and the complex was shut down.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
Federal regulators said Southern California Edison Co. and a contractor were responsible for design flaws that led to the permanent shutdown of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in June. To the frustration of critics, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Monday proposed safety citations - but no fines - against Edison and its contractor, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, for defective steam generators at the plant near San Clemente. Edison said the proposed citation by the NRC came as no surprise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Southern California Edison, owner of the now-defunct San Onofre nuclear plant , has made documents available on a website  relating to the ill-fated steam generator replacement that prompted the plant's closure. The documents, some of which had not been previously released, include correspondence and minutes of meetings between staff from Edison and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries - the Japanese company that was contracted to manufacture the replacement generators - about their design, and documents submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Closing the San Onofre nuclear power plant is in the "best interests" of Southern California Edison's 4.9 million customers and those ratepayers should be prepared to pay a portion of the shutdown costs. That's the message in a public letter published as a full-page advertisement in the Los Angeles Times on Monday. "If a utility asset must be retired before the end of its expected life, the utility recovers from customers its reasonable investment costs," Edison wrote.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Southern California Edison Co. has started legal action against the manufacturer of steam generators whose failure forced the permanent closure of the San Onofre nuclear power plant on the northern San Diego County coast. The Rosemead-based electric utility, as expected, filed a formal Notice of Dispute early Thursday on Mitsubishi Heavy Industries of Japan and its United States subsidiary Mitsubishi Nuclear Energy Systems. Q&A:  Why is it closing and what will it cost?
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Southern California Edison Co. has started legal action against the manufacturer of steam generators that failed and forced the permanent closure in June of the San Onofre nuclear power plant on the northern San Diego County coast. As expected, the electric utility filed a formal notice of dispute early Thursday with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries of Japan and its United States subsidiary, Mitsubishi Nuclear Energy Systems. The action sets in motion negotiations that involve finding fault and assessing financial damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
The picturesque beach city of San Clemente has hummed along for decades just up the highway from the ominous concrete domes of the San Onofre nuclear plant. To residents, there were always reminders of their neighbor's presence - the quarterly emergency siren tests and the potassium iodide tablets that local agencies kept on hand to distribute to residents in the 10-mile emergency planning zone around the plant. But for the most part, the 63,000 residents of this city on the southern edge of Orange County - known for its proximity to legendary surf spots and the rolling coastal hills of Camp Pendleton Marine base - went about their daily lives for years with little thought of the nuclear generating station four miles down Interstate 5. The tide began to shift in 2011, however, when a tsunami inundated Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, leading to equipment failures and meltdowns at three reactors and raising new concerns about the safety of Southern California's own coastal nuclear plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Ken Bensinger
In March 2004, an attorney for Southern California Edison sat before state utility regulators to propose what seemed like a great deal. The San Onofre nuclear plant was approaching the end of its life span. But Edison wanted to invest $680 million in new steam generators, attorney Carol Schmid-Frazee told a judge presiding over a hearing at the California Public Utilities Commission's San Francisco headquarters. The new equipment, she said, would give the 2,200-megawatt plant a new lease on life, providing cheap, reliable energy in Southern California for decades to come while also saving ratepayers nearly $2 billion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
The ratepayer advocacy arm of the California Public Utilities Commission called on the commission Tuesday to speed up its review of the costs of the outage at the San Onofre nuclear plant and to immediately cut hundreds of millions of dollars from rates. San Onofre was taken offline in January 2012 after a tube in one of the plant's newly replaced steam generators leaked a small amount of radioactive steam. On June 7, after 16 months of uncertainty about the plant's fate, majority owner Southern California Edison announced that it would be shut for good . The utilities commission opened an investigation into the costs of the outage in October, as required by state law after a plant has been out of service for nine months.
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