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Steel Cloud Sculpture

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
"Steel Cloud," the $33-million, four-block-long structure that would be poised over the Hollywood Freeway in downtown Los Angeles, underwent its first test by city officialdom on Thursday. It passed--sort of. In what they considered a "voluntary early review," members of the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Commission examined an intricate scale model of the structure, quizzed architects and generally tried to ascertain how they felt about Hani Rashid's controversial design. They liked it--sort of.
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NEWS
January 13, 1994 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the boom and bravado of the 1980s, Los Angeles' big thinkers felt good enough about their town to propose construction of a grand monument to welcome the world, something like New York's Statue of Liberty. What they conceived was a massive Erector set-style sculpture. It was to have straddled the Hollywood Freeway near City Hall, knitting museums, theaters and aquariums into a maze of mechanical steel beams. Price tag: $33 million.
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NEWS
January 13, 1994 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the boom and bravado of the 1980s, Los Angeles' big thinkers felt good enough about their town to propose construction of a grand monument to welcome the world, something like New York's Statue of Liberty. What they conceived was a massive Erector set-style sculpture. It was to have straddled the Hollywood Freeway near City Hall, knitting museums, theaters and aquariums into a maze of mechanical steel beams. Price tag: $33 million.
NEWS
October 12, 1989
I read comments by certain members of the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Commission concerning the proposed multimillion dollar "Steel Cloud" project. And I say, install if you must this expensive formless four-block-long contraption to celebrate Los Angeles, but spare comparison "akin to New York's Statute of Liberty," an awe-inspiring symbol of dignity and symmetry. HENRY E. RUTZEBECK Sunland
NEWS
October 12, 1989
I read comments by certain members of the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Commission concerning the proposed multimillion dollar "Steel Cloud" project. And I say, install if you must this expensive formless four-block-long contraption to celebrate Los Angeles, but spare comparison "akin to New York's Statute of Liberty," an awe-inspiring symbol of dignity and symmetry. HENRY E. RUTZEBECK Sunland
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It looks like something more likely to be seen at Cape Canaveral than on a hilltop next to the downtown business district. No wonder the 1,100-foot-tall, rocket engine-shaped "monument" to Los Angeles that a Culver City artist and a West Los Angeles developer want to build was launching so much debate Thursday. The proposed spiral tower would be topped with a bronze sculpture of a sword-waving angel that would be twice the size of the Statue of Liberty.
TRAVEL
January 29, 2012 | Christopher Reynolds
New Mexico This year, New Mexicans mark 100 years of statehood. But much of the state's appeal stems from its human history that goes back much further. (In 2010, Santa Fe celebrated 400 years of cityhood.) Explore here: the adobe architecture and art galleries of Santa Fe; the vintage signage along old Route 66; the lingering hippie vibe of Truth or Consequences. Don't forget the Lightning Field, an art installation outside Quemado where (for $150 to $250 a person) you spend a summer night in a wood cabin and wait to see if lightning will strike one of the 400 tall steel poles outside your door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
"Steel Cloud," the $33-million, four-block-long structure that would be poised over the Hollywood Freeway in downtown Los Angeles, underwent its first test by city officialdom on Thursday. It passed--sort of. In what they considered a "voluntary early review," members of the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Commission examined an intricate scale model of the structure, quizzed architects and generally tried to ascertain how they felt about Hani Rashid's controversial design. They liked it--sort of.
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