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Steel Dynamics Inc

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BUSINESS
March 24, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
General Motors Corp. is suing Textron Inc. and Steel Dynamics Inc., which the automaker accuses of overcharging for steel and steel parts. The defendants violated contracts by charging extra to compensate for rising steel prices, General Motors spokesman Tom Hill said. Both companies have threatened to stop shipments if they aren't paid, Hill said. General Motors is the only customer disputing the price increases, said a spokesman for Fort Wayne, Mich.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
General Motors Corp. is suing Textron Inc. and Steel Dynamics Inc., which the automaker accuses of overcharging for steel and steel parts. The defendants violated contracts by charging extra to compensate for rising steel prices, General Motors spokesman Tom Hill said. Both companies have threatened to stop shipments if they aren't paid, Hill said. General Motors is the only customer disputing the price increases, said a spokesman for Fort Wayne, Mich.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
A U.S. trade panel on Friday ruled that hot-rolled-steel imports from Japan are injuring domestic companies, a decision that clears the way for the Commerce Department to impose duties that could price the foreign steelmakers out of that market. The 6-0 vote by the International Trade Commission handed the U.S. steel industry its latest triumph in a campaign to drive out imports it contends are sold at unfairly low prices, forcing the companies to idle plants and eliminate thousands of jobs.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the White House struggling to assist the beleaguered U.S. steel industry, the International Trade Commission recommended Friday that President Bush impose punitive tariffs as high as 40% on steel imports for up to four years. Bush, who has 60 days to act on the recommendations, is expected to support punitive measures because he initiated the ITC investigation.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ
Steel stocks. They're staid, unglamorous and for the last three years, they haven't earned, well, a plugged nickel. So is there any reason to buy them? Yes, some analysts say. A few steel issues have gotten knocked down so much that, relative to their financial prospects today, they're bargains that could offer rewards in the months ahead. Investors certainly couldn't be blamed for looking elsewhere.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The protests of the American steel industry over a wave of imports from Japan, Russia, Brazil, South Korea and other nations are justified this time. Furthermore, the issue here goes well beyond steel--an industry that now employs only 163,000 workers, a tiny fraction of the U.S. labor force. The steel imports are part of a general unloading of goods this year by producers in Asia, Russia and Latin America, which are shipping to the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON and EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Reaching further than his predecessor to help a troubled domestic industry, President Bush on Tuesday called for an investigation into whether U.S. steelmakers are being unfairly undercut by cheap foreign imports. The move could lead within months to the use of trade sanctions against countries that allow subsidized steel to be dumped in the U.S. market.
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