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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Hughey, 73, a steel guitar player who toured for years with country legend Conway Twitty and recorded with Elvis Presley and many other stars, died Sunday at a hospital in Hendersonville, Tenn., his publicist said. The Tennessean newspaper in Nashville reported that he died of heart problems. Hughey was credited with developing a unique style of playing that focused on the instrument's high tones, resulting in a distinctive "crying sound." Born in 1935 in Elaine, Ark.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | McClatchy Newspapers
Guitarist and ethnomusicologist Bob Brozman, who progressed from an early fascination with the delta blues of the South to a consuming passion for the traditional music of Hawaii and became a leading authority on the National steel guitar, has died. He was 59. Brozman was found dead April 23 at his home in Santa Cruz. His death was ruled a suicide, according to the coroner's office of the Santa Cruz County Sheriff's Department. Brozman emerged in Santa Cruz in the 1970s as a street musician, playing a decidedly uncontemporary American roots style of music ranging from obscure jazz tunes to Hawaiian chanties.
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NEWS
November 24, 2007
Hughey obituary: The obituary of steel guitar player John Hughey in Wednesday's California section said he was born in 1935. He was born in 1933.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
Arriving as if from outer space in the early '00s as something of a Jimi Hendrix of pedal steel guitar, Robert Randolph rose out of the "sacred steel" of gospel churches that have been subbing the instrument in place of a church organ since the '40s. After fronting his own band as well as the jam-band blues supergroup the Word, Randolph has returned to his roots with his blues-soaked new project, the Slide Brothers, which also features pedal steel players Calvin Cooke, Aubrey Ghent, Chuck and Darick Campbell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | McClatchy Newspapers
Guitarist and ethnomusicologist Bob Brozman, who progressed from an early fascination with the delta blues of the South to a consuming passion for the traditional music of Hawaii and became a leading authority on the National steel guitar, has died. He was 59. Brozman was found dead April 23 at his home in Santa Cruz. His death was ruled a suicide, according to the coroner's office of the Santa Cruz County Sheriff's Department. Brozman emerged in Santa Cruz in the 1970s as a street musician, playing a decidedly uncontemporary American roots style of music ranging from obscure jazz tunes to Hawaiian chanties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Bandleader Alvino Rey, a guitar virtuoso whose big-band-era orchestra is best known for its No. 1 hit "Deep in the Heart of Texas" and a string of novelty tunes, has died. He was 95. Rey, who also was influential in the development of early electric guitars and the pedal steel guitar, died Tuesday of complications of pneumonia and congestive heart failure at a rehabilitation center in Draper, Utah, said his son, Jon. His father had lived in nearby Sandy since 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
Arriving as if from outer space in the early '00s as something of a Jimi Hendrix of pedal steel guitar, Robert Randolph rose out of the "sacred steel" of gospel churches that have been subbing the instrument in place of a church organ since the '40s. After fronting his own band as well as the jam-band blues supergroup the Word, Randolph has returned to his roots with his blues-soaked new project, the Slide Brothers, which also features pedal steel players Calvin Cooke, Aubrey Ghent, Chuck and Darick Campbell.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987
A free USO-style show featuring Jackie Cooper, Alvino Rey and the Southwest Jazz Ballet Company of Houston will be staged Sept. 19 at 11 a.m. at the U.S. Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center, 1700 Stadium Way, next to Dodger Stadium. The variety show, celebrating the dedication of the architecturally renowned center as a state historical landmark, will be preceded by a formal military change of command and retirement ceremony at 9 a.m., which features the 3rd Marine Air Wing Band from El Toro.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1987 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Is juju the Yoruban word for salsa picante ? If you said yes, you wouldn't get any argument from the crowd that was swept up by the slinky Nigerian juju music of King Sunny Ade and his colorful 17-member African Beats at the Greek Theatre on Friday. The infectious interplay of four electric guitars and seven percussionists--including two on the amazing and aptly named talking drum--would not sound unfamiliar to fans of such Latin music stars as Tito Puente or Santana.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
One of the musical highlights in recent years of the National Assn. of Music Merchants'annual trade show, now under way in Anaheim, has been Deke Dickerson'sGuitar Geek Festival, which the roots rock guitarist and band leader only half jokingly bills as "the best guitar festival in the world." This year's marathon event gets going at 4 p.m. today at the Anaheim Plaza Hotel and if history holds, it will run well past midnight. The lineup is topped by seminal rock guitar hero Duane Eddy, who's giving his first full-fledged concert on the West Coast in nearly a decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
One of the musical highlights in recent years of the National Assn. of Music Merchants'annual trade show, now under way in Anaheim, has been Deke Dickerson'sGuitar Geek Festival, which the roots rock guitarist and band leader only half jokingly bills as "the best guitar festival in the world." This year's marathon event gets going at 4 p.m. today at the Anaheim Plaza Hotel and if history holds, it will run well past midnight. The lineup is topped by seminal rock guitar hero Duane Eddy, who's giving his first full-fledged concert on the West Coast in nearly a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
John "Marmaduke" Dawson had original tunes in his pocket and a guitar in his hand in 1969 when a buddy just learning to play pedal steel guitar often joined his weekly gig at the Underground, a Bay Area hofbrau house. The friend was Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead, and those sessions set the stage for the New Riders of the Purple Sage, a group they considered "the original psychedelic cowboy band."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Don Helms, the steel guitarist whose aching instrumental cry gave musical voice to the anguish and the joy in virtually all the key recordings by country music titan Hank Williams, died Monday in Nashville, apparently of a heart attack. He was 81. Helms died at Skyline Medical Center, said Michael Thomas, a director at Forest Lawn Funeral Home.
NEWS
November 24, 2007
Hughey obituary: The obituary of steel guitar player John Hughey in Wednesday's California section said he was born in 1935. He was born in 1933.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Hughey, 73, a steel guitar player who toured for years with country legend Conway Twitty and recorded with Elvis Presley and many other stars, died Sunday at a hospital in Hendersonville, Tenn., his publicist said. The Tennessean newspaper in Nashville reported that he died of heart problems. Hughey was credited with developing a unique style of playing that focused on the instrument's high tones, resulting in a distinctive "crying sound." Born in 1935 in Elaine, Ark.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2004 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
An informal survey among the faithful would tell you just this: Since Robert Randolph's been making his joyful noise, the distance between heaven and Earth has measurably narrowed. So too, for that matter, has the distance between blues and rock, country and soul, black and white and young and old. Charting a straight line from his Orange, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Don't let the name mislead you. Bembeya Jazz is a band that, for all its entertaining attributes, has very little to do with jazz. But that's not necessarily a problem. When it was initially organized more than 40 years ago, the Guinean ensemble concocted a gumbo blending traditional African elements, Afro Cuban rhythms, a brassy sound and stirring vocals, quickly becoming one of West Africa's most highly regarded units.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2004 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
True, the electric guitar and its relatives offer almost infinite timbral and dynamic possibilities for composers of so-called "serious" music. But -- and this is crucial -- you need good musical ideas to carry these experiments forward, and you need an inviting, sympathetic environment in which to present them. These elements were, for the most part, absent from a brave concert Saturday night titled "(Un-)Mapping the Electric Guitar."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Bandleader Alvino Rey, a guitar virtuoso whose big-band-era orchestra is best known for its No. 1 hit "Deep in the Heart of Texas" and a string of novelty tunes, has died. He was 95. Rey, who also was influential in the development of early electric guitars and the pedal steel guitar, died Tuesday of complications of pneumonia and congestive heart failure at a rehabilitation center in Draper, Utah, said his son, Jon. His father had lived in nearby Sandy since 1979.
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