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April 18, 2010 | By Nicole Radzievich
Martin Tower isn't a young 38. The 21-story world headquarters of the former Bethlehem Steel was around for the company's heyday, built in 1972 as a symbol of its might, and then became an emblem of the mismanagement that led to its demise. That history is what developers are hoping will get Martin Tower, which is vacant and in need of many repairs, on the National Register of Historic Places a dozen years shy of its 50th birthday -- the age buildings usually must attain to be considered historic.
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NATIONAL
October 23, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
WINTERSVILLE, Ohio - They gather at this old watering hole every week, watching Steelers games and catching up, talking about their children and grandchildren, layoffs and job prospects, marriages and divorces. With the 2012 presidential election two weeks away and Ohio one of the most vital states on the path to the White House, talk easily turns to politics, and the salty language flows as freely as the Miller Lite. They are mill workers, retirees and skilled laborers, and all have felt the brunt of the recession and the ongoing decline of the steel industry in this swath of eastern Ohio.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1986
Nick Buell's letter (Aug. 13), "Decline of U.S. Steel Industry," brought up some too-often heard comments on the decline of the U.S. steel industry. His thesis seems to be this: Foreign steel or foreign-controlled steel companies in the United States are driving U.S. steel producers out of business, therefore the U.S. government should intervene and stop, once and for all, this threat to our domestic steel industry. It is my view that the Japanese, the Europeans, and the Koreans--and a number of others--are simply outperforming us in the arena of industrial competition.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2010 | By Nicole Radzievich
Martin Tower isn't a young 38. The 21-story world headquarters of the former Bethlehem Steel was around for the company's heyday, built in 1972 as a symbol of its might, and then became an emblem of the mismanagement that led to its demise. That history is what developers are hoping will get Martin Tower, which is vacant and in need of many repairs, on the National Register of Historic Places a dozen years shy of its 50th birthday -- the age buildings usually must attain to be considered historic.
NEWS
April 4, 1992
Robert G. Welch, 76, former president of the Steel Service Center Institute and a longtime spokesman for the steel industry. Welch was credited with several advances in the metal service industry, including reforms in the way steel is stored and distributed.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | JONATHAN KIRSCH
And the Wolf Finally Came: The Decline of the American Steel Industry by John P. Hoerr (University of Pittsburgh Press: $39.95 cloth; 14.95, paper; 691 pages) If you really want to know what succeeds and what fails in the American way of doing business, put down Lee Iacocca's "Talking Straight" and Donald Trump's "The Art of the Deal"--and pick up a copy of John P. Hoerr's "And the Wolf Finally Came." Hoerr's saga of the American steel industry is a surprisingly rich and readable book.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Job cuts, plant closings, productivity improvements and import controls have returned profits to American steel producers after a long period of devastating financial losses. But the industry's turnaround has meant something else to Russ Weidner. "Right now, we can't buy for love or money a pound of steel for delivery in 1987," said the executive vice president of Paragon Industries, a producer of welded drilling pipe based in Glenpool, Okla. "We just can't get steel."
BUSINESS
January 26, 1986 | JOHN F. LAWRENCE
U.S. Steel's recently announced plan to use raw steel from South Korea in its West Coast operations has raised anew the question of what it's going to take to save the American steel industry. In a year of major labor talks in the industry and off-year congressional elections, the plan is likely to become a hot political as well as bargaining issue.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2007 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
Beverly Hills-based buyout firm Platinum Equity said Tuesday it had agreed to acquire Ryerson Inc., a Chicago-based steel distributor and processor, for about $1 billion in cash. For Platinum, known for taking over high-tech companies, Ryerson would be its third steel industry acquisition in less than three years. The private equity firm, which is led by billionaire Tom Gores, agreed to pay $34.50 a share for Ryerson and to assume about $1 billion in debt.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1988 | DAVID IGNATIUS, The Washington Post and (David Ignatius, an associate editor of The Washington Post, is editor of the Outlook section. He covered the steel industry from 1976 to 1977 for The Wall Street Journal.)
A trip through the Monongahela Valley gives a picture of what the "restructuring" of the American economy in the 1980s is all about. Ten years ago, the aging mills of this valley were still producing vast quantities of steel--but not very efficiently. They were a symbol of a high-cost, featherbedded steel industry in which labor and management had united to seek protection from foreign competition. Today, the Mon Valley looks like Atlanta after Sherman's March.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2009 | By Peter Whoriskey
The U.S. International Trade Commission has ruled that a surge of subsidized Chinese steel has harmed or threatens to harm the U.S. industry, in one of the largest-ever trade cases involving the two countries. The volume of steel pipes imported from China more than tripled between 2006 and 2008, rising from $632 million to $2.6 billion, according to the Commerce Department. The ruling means that the United States can collect duties on the Chinese imports. "This is great news for the U.S. steel industry," said Roger Schagrin, attorney for the U.S. steelmakers and the United Steelworkers union.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | Sharon Mizota
There's something unexpectedly poignant about Paul Shambroom's color photographs of factories, offices and nuclear weapons. Seen through the lens of economic free fall and the constant, ill-defined threat of terrorism, his meticulously composed images of production floors, cubicles and missile silos -- dating from the mid-1980s through the 1990s -- seem like documents of a bygone world, one that was industrious (if bland) and globally dominant (if plodding). It certainly wasn't the good old days, and Shambroom's project has never been nostalgic.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2008 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
A booming market for steel is paying off big for two Los Angeles-area companies. L.A.-based Reliance Steel & Aluminum Co. said Tuesday that it had agreed to buy a smaller metal processor from Beverly Hills-based buyout firm Platinum Equity for more than $300 million. For Reliance, the country's largest metal processor, the purchase of Atlanta-based PNA Group Holding Corp. would extend a string of more than 40 acquisitions since the company went public in 1994. Reliance's stock jumped $2.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2007 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
Beverly Hills-based buyout firm Platinum Equity said Tuesday it had agreed to acquire Ryerson Inc., a Chicago-based steel distributor and processor, for about $1 billion in cash. For Platinum, known for taking over high-tech companies, Ryerson would be its third steel industry acquisition in less than three years. The private equity firm, which is led by billionaire Tom Gores, agreed to pay $34.50 a share for Ryerson and to assume about $1 billion in debt.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Swedish steel company SSAB Svenskt Stal said it made a $7.7-billion offer for U.S.-based steel-products maker IPSCO Inc. in a deal that would give it a platform for expansion in North America. The offer of $160 a share was recommended by the boards of both companies, SSAB said. Lisle, Ill.-based IPSCO has about 4,400 employees and an annual steelmaking capacity of more than 4 million tons.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The U.S. Justice Department ordered global steel giant Mittal Steel Co. to sell its Sparrows Point mill near Baltimore to settle antitrust issues raised by the Dutch company's recent merger with Luxembourg-based Arcelor. The proposed consent decree would allow Mittal to keep a Weirton, W.Va., mill that had volunteered to be sold to preserve competition for tin-plated steel, used primarily for food and aerosol cans.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1987 | From Reuters
Steel companies and the federal government are making a concerted effort to develop revolutionary production methods that will reinvigorate America's once-powerful steel industry. Experiments on as many as five new ways of casting steel are under way, but the same countries that have grabbed huge chunks of steel market share from U.S. producers are also in the race to develop new technology. "It's quite clear that we're not the only ones with these new technologies," said Dr.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2006 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Cutting costs has become a way of life at Aggressive Engineering Corp., a Southern California metal stamping company. Over the last decade, President Dan Bridges has slashed his workforce from 52 to 25, capped wages and retooled the assembly line to increase its output of metal parts. But Bridges said he might have to close his doors if the U.S. government doesn't lift the duties imposed in 1993 on foreign firms accused of dumping cheap steel in the U.S. market.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2006 | From the Associated Press
European steel giant Arcelor, fighting a hostile bid from Mittal Steel Co., said it had reached a deal that would give it a controlling stake in Severstal, Russia's largest steelmaker, and 1.25 billion euros ($1.59 billion) in cash in exchange for 32% of Luxembourg-based Arcelor. The combined company would surpass Amsterdam-based Mittal in terms of revenue and production. Under the deal, Alexei Mordashov, Severstal's controlling shareholder, would pay Arcelor 1.
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