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BUSINESS
February 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Three European steelmakers announced plans Monday to merge into the world's largest with production of 46 million tons per year. France's Usinor, Luxembourg's Arbed and the Spanish Aceralia Corporacion Siderurgica said the merger would be completed by fall. The new group, to be set up in Luxembourg, would make an offer for the shares of each of the firms. Usinor is to hold 56.5% of the new group, Arbed would hold 23.4% and Aceralia would hold 20.1%.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Three European steelmakers announced plans Monday to merge into the world's largest with production of 46 million tons per year. France's Usinor, Luxembourg's Arbed and the Spanish Aceralia Corporacion Siderurgica said the merger would be completed by fall. The new group, to be set up in Luxembourg, would make an offer for the shares of each of the firms. Usinor is to hold 56.5% of the new group, Arbed would hold 23.4% and Aceralia would hold 20.1%.
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BUSINESS
February 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The European Commission is due to fine 17 steel companies Wednesday on grounds they colluded illegally to fix prices, a senior official for the commission said. Ironically, the fines will be announced the day after the commission meets industry representatives to seek cuts in production capacity as part of an attempt to haul the beleaguered sector out of trouble.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1999 | Associated Press
Steel producers in six countries have illegally dumped stainless steel in the United States at prices below production costs or home-market prices, the Commerce Department concluded. The department found that three of the countries--Belgium, Italy and South Africa--also gave producers unfair subsidies that effectively lowered prices. Canada, South Korea and Taiwan were guilty only of dumping, the department said. Those countries face tariffs of up to 60% on that product if the independent U.S.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Investors frightened by a swooning stock market, volatile technology issues and shifting economic sands should take a moment to realize that change is not that sudden or final. Industries adapt and go on, providing fresh opportunity long after conventional wisdom has written them off for dead. Witness the once-dominant global industry called steel.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1999 | Associated Press
Steel producers in six countries have illegally dumped stainless steel in the United States at prices below production costs or home-market prices, the Commerce Department concluded. The department found that three of the countries--Belgium, Italy and South Africa--also gave producers unfair subsidies that effectively lowered prices. Canada, South Korea and Taiwan were guilty only of dumping, the department said. Those countries face tariffs of up to 60% on that product if the independent U.S.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Investors frightened by a swooning stock market, volatile technology issues and shifting economic sands should take a moment to realize that change is not that sudden or final. Industries adapt and go on, providing fresh opportunity long after conventional wisdom has written them off for dead. Witness the once-dominant global industry called steel.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The European Commission is due to fine 17 steel companies Wednesday on grounds they colluded illegally to fix prices, a senior official for the commission said. Ironically, the fines will be announced the day after the commission meets industry representatives to seek cuts in production capacity as part of an attempt to haul the beleaguered sector out of trouble.
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