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Steel Industry Japan

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BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
B etrayal. That is the word being used to describe feelings here about dumping charges that American steelmakers filed last week against their Japanese joint-venture partners. "Japanese companies went into the United States and helped rebuild the U.S. steel industry in partnership with American companies," says Kenji Ochi, head of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry's steel industry section. "For the U.S.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | Associated Press
The International Trade Commission imposed duties of as much as 95.29% on Japanese exports of tin plate, the kind of steel used to make aerosol, food and beer cans. The punitive duty represents the amount the Commerce Department determined was the difference between the price Japanese exporters were charging customers in the United States and the price they were charging in Japan for the same type of steel. The Japanese steel industry expressed bewilderment that the ITC, a U.S.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nippon Steel To Cut 7,000 Jobs: Nippon Steel Corp. said it would eliminate the jobs over three years, mainly through attrition, as part of a cost-cutting effort to cope with Japan's recession. The restructuring plan also will slash the Tokyo-based company's budget for equipment investment over the next three years to $3.36 billion, down 40% from the allotment for 1991 to 1993. Nippon Steel, Japan's largest steel maker, expects the plan to save about $2.91 billion, over the 1994 to 1996 period.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the prime of this tiny island in Japan's Inland Sea, the workday began like a crescendo of cicadas in song, as thousands of hammers pounded nails into the hulls of wooden ships. In later years, as iron replaced wood, the cacophony grew even louder. The islanders were the premier producers of Japan's domestic fleets of cargo ships, tankers and dredging vessels. "It was noisy, yet it was prosperous and thriving," said island historian Hitoshi Fujimoto, 73.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steel Firms May Buy From South Africa: Six steelmakers plan to import iron ore from South Africa after the government lifts economic sanctions against Pretoria, industry sources said. Nippon Steel Corp., NKK Corp., Kawasaki Steel Corp., Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd., Kobe Steel Ltd. and Nisshin Steel Co. have concluded contracts with South Africa's Iscor company, the sources said.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The high-profile campaign against Asian steel imports being waged by U.S. steel mills is part of a pattern of rising protectionism around the world driven by the Asia economic crisis and related pressures. Even as traditional trade barriers such as quotas and tariffs have come down, countries have turned in droves to one of the few legal remedies left: anti-dumping safeguards.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kobe Steel Expects Huge Loss: The nation's No. 5 steel producer said it will lose $1.13 billion in the fiscal year ending March 31 after sustaining $1.45 billion in damages from the earthquake that rocked Kobe in January. The company suffered $800 million in direct damage to its assets and lost $650 million due to disruptions in production, sales and shipments.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nippon Steel To Cut 7,000 Jobs: Nippon Steel Corp. said it would eliminate the jobs over three years, mainly through attrition, as part of a cost-cutting effort to cope with Japan's recession. The restructuring plan also will slash the Tokyo-based company's budget for equipment investment over the next three years to $3.36 billion, down 40% from the allotment for 1991 to 1993. Nippon Steel, Japan's largest steel maker, expects the plan to save about $2.91 billion, over the 1994 to 1996 period.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sumitomo Metal to Cut 3,000 Employees: Integrated steelmaker Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd. said it will reduce its work force by 3,000 over three years. The cutbacks will be made in steel-related divisions and will encompass 2,200 factory workers and 800 administrative workers, the company said. Sumitomo Metal had 20,727 workers as of Sept. 30. NKK Corp.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
B etrayal. That is the word being used to describe feelings here about dumping charges that American steelmakers filed last week against their Japanese joint-venture partners. "Japanese companies went into the United States and helped rebuild the U.S. steel industry in partnership with American companies," says Kenji Ochi, head of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry's steel industry section. "For the U.S.
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