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BUSINESS
February 3, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steelworkers Reach Tentative Pact: The union said the four-year contract with Lukens Steel Co. would cover 1,150 workers in Coatesville, Pa. Andrew V. Palm, chief negotiator for the United Steelworkers of America, said the agreement includes provisions for wage and benefit increases, employment security and improvements regarding the contracting of work and in pension payments. A secret ballot vote is scheduled for Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
February 3, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steelworkers Reach Tentative Pact: The union said the four-year contract with Lukens Steel Co. would cover 1,150 workers in Coatesville, Pa. Andrew V. Palm, chief negotiator for the United Steelworkers of America, said the agreement includes provisions for wage and benefit increases, employment security and improvements regarding the contracting of work and in pension payments. A secret ballot vote is scheduled for Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
As you cross the Monongahela River from Pittsburgh into Homestead, first and foremost you see the mill. The mill that made the steel for the Empire State Building, the Sears Tower and the Golden Gate Bridge. The mill that produced two-thirds of the armor-plating used to crush Hitler. The mill that once provided jobs to 15,000 steelworkers. It is--or, more accurately, was--the Homestead Works of U.S. Steel. Once, it was one of America's most important industrial assets.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
"I got him!" C. Norman Morrow III slams the door shut on his jet-black Camaro, wipes the thick Florida summer sweat from his forehead, peels out of the sand-covered construction site and finally smiles for the first time in an hour. "You know how I could tell? He started using my line. He started saying he didn't want to put Volkswagen engines in Cadillac bodies. That's my line that I developed. When he started saying my line back to me, I had him won over." He exhales.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
As you cross the Monongahela River from Pittsburgh into Homestead, first and foremost you see the mill. The mill that made the steel for the Empire State Building, the Sears Tower and the Golden Gate Bridge. The mill that produced two-thirds of the armor-plating used to crush Hitler. The mill that once provided jobs to 15,000 steelworkers. It is--or, more accurately, was--the Homestead Works of U.S. Steel. Once, it was one of America's most important industrial assets.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
"I got him!" C. Norman Morrow III slams the door shut on his jet-black Camaro, wipes the thick Florida summer sweat from his forehead, peels out of the sand-covered construction site and finally smiles for the first time in an hour. "You know how I could tell? He started using my line. He started saying he didn't want to put Volkswagen engines in Cadillac bodies. That's my line that I developed. When he started saying my line back to me, I had him won over." He exhales.
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