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Steel Industry Poland

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NEWS
April 29, 1988
A member of the Polish Politburo went to a huge steel plant at Nowa Huta in southern Poland, where half the workers are on strike, but there was no sign of an end to Poland's worst labor trouble since the active Solidarity union days of 1980-81. Politburo member Alfred Miodowicz's visit coincided with an official warning to strikers that their work stoppage is illegal.
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NEWS
July 26, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sign above the grimy control booth shows that the mixture in the furnace is cooking at 650 degrees, still 1,000 degrees below its becoming steel and three or four hours from the point it can be poured. With a roar of compressed air, a fresh jolt of oil shoots into the furnace; a dragon's breath of flame spurts from the viewing holes in the three furnace doors, and a bright trickle of molten gravel drips from the center gate. This is No. 3 Furnace at the Kosciuszko Steel Works.
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NEWS
July 26, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sign above the grimy control booth shows that the mixture in the furnace is cooking at 650 degrees, still 1,000 degrees below its becoming steel and three or four hours from the point it can be poured. With a roar of compressed air, a fresh jolt of oil shoots into the furnace; a dragon's breath of flame spurts from the viewing holes in the three furnace doors, and a bright trickle of molten gravel drips from the center gate. This is No. 3 Furnace at the Kosciuszko Steel Works.
NEWS
April 29, 1988
A member of the Polish Politburo went to a huge steel plant at Nowa Huta in southern Poland, where half the workers are on strike, but there was no sign of an end to Poland's worst labor trouble since the active Solidarity union days of 1980-81. Politburo member Alfred Miodowicz's visit coincided with an official warning to strikers that their work stoppage is illegal.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ryszard Puchala is camping out in a mile-long line at the government-owned cement factory, waiting three days to buy raw materials for his construction business. It may not be worth the trouble. So sour is the economy of Poland's countryside that most of the local farmers cannot afford Puchala's services anyway. Times are tougher still at the other end of Eastern Europe, where Romania is trying desperately to inject Western investment into its foundering economy.
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