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Steel Industry United States

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BUSINESS
July 6, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
B etrayal. That is the word being used to describe feelings here about dumping charges that American steelmakers filed last week against their Japanese joint-venture partners. "Japanese companies went into the United States and helped rebuild the U.S. steel industry in partnership with American companies," says Kenji Ochi, head of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry's steel industry section. "For the U.S.
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BUSINESS
December 8, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the White House struggling to assist the beleaguered U.S. steel industry, the International Trade Commission recommended Friday that President Bush impose punitive tariffs as high as 40% on steel imports for up to four years. Bush, who has 60 days to act on the recommendations, is expected to support punitive measures because he initiated the ITC investigation.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
In a move heralding an emerging South Korean role in overseas investment, Sammi Special Steel Corp. is about to become the first Korean firm to buy American factories. Moreover, $180 million of the $220-million deal will be financed by an international syndicate of banks led by a South Korean bank, a sign of South Korea's growing financial strength. South Korea, once deeply in debt, will enter the ranks of net creditors this year, Kim Kun, a Bank of Korea governor, said in a recent interview.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. trade panel ruled Monday that foreign imports pose a serious threat to the U.S. steel industry, paving the way for protective measures that critics fear will further increase trade tensions and weaken the global economy by raising costs. In a move applauded by financially strapped U.S. steel makers, the International Trade Commission ruled that a dozen product lines accounting for 80% of all steel produced in the U.S. had been severely hurt by cheaper imports.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1999 | From Reuters
The Clinton administration made an eleventh-hour push Monday to defeat a controversial steel quota bill, decrying the threat of a trade war and scurrying to launch several new anti-dumping investigations. The legislation, which would impose strict limits on steel imports, faces a close vote in the Senate today. Commerce Secretary William Daley warned that the bill could harm the economy and might even backfire on U.S. steelmakers if a trade war were to erupt.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1999 | Associated Press
Steel imports rose in March after a four-month decline, a reversal that could help boost support in Congress for quotas on foreign shipments, the Commerce Department reported. Shipments of foreign steel to the U.S. totaled 2.5 million metric tons in March, according to preliminary government figures. That's a 25% increase from February. Still, the March total represents a 30% drop from November. Shipments from Japan and Brazil, two of the chief targets of the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The Commerce Department, in a preliminary decision, plans to impose duties of as much as 50% on automotive- and appliance-steel imports from Indonesia, Turkey and three other countries, ruling that the metal is being sold at unfairly low prices in the U.S. The decision marks a hopeful development for U.S. steelmakers seeking to limit imports that soared from countries whose economies have been troubled.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Republican-dominated House approved a rare Democratic-led initiative Wednesday, passing a bill that would slap limits on imports of steel to help the beleaguered U.S. steel industry. The bill was sent to the Senate despite strong opposition from the House GOP leadership and President Clinton, making its chances of ultimately becoming law slim. But the measure's success in the House spotlights a troubled dark spot in the booming U.S.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | Associated Press
Subsidized imports of steel reinforcing bars from five countries are harming American manufacturers, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled. The six-member panel's decision allows the Commerce Department to decide whether to impose tariffs on the rebar, used in making reinforced concrete. The disputed rebar is manufactured in Belarus, China, Korea, Latvia and Moldova. Eleven American companies filed the complaint.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. trade panel ruled Monday that foreign imports pose a serious threat to the U.S. steel industry, paving the way for protective measures that critics fear will further increase trade tensions and weaken the global economy by raising costs. In a move applauded by financially strapped U.S. steel makers, the International Trade Commission ruled that a dozen product lines accounting for 80% of all steel produced in the U.S. had been severely hurt by cheaper imports.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | Associated Press
Subsidized imports of steel reinforcing bars from five countries are harming American manufacturers, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled. The six-member panel's decision allows the Commerce Department to decide whether to impose tariffs on the rebar, used in making reinforced concrete. The disputed rebar is manufactured in Belarus, China, Korea, Latvia and Moldova. Eleven American companies filed the complaint.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2001 | Reuters
USX-U.S. Steel, the No. 1 U.S. steelmaker, and Nucor Corp. said they have raised prices for some types of steel by as much as $40 a ton, citing a boost in U.S. demand and a decline in competition from imports. Steel prices have been at a 20-year low, and the steel industry is trying to lift prices off that low, USX spokesman Mike Dixon said.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2000 | Bloomberg News
LTV Corp., the nation's No. 3 steelmaker, said its board was meeting to consider whether the company should file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection by today. The company, which has had eight consecutive quarterly losses, said it will exhaust its cash without additional financing. Meanwhile, U.S. regulators ruled that low-priced steel imports from China, Argentina, Ukraine and eight other countries are harming U.S.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2000 | Associated Press
Circular seamless stainless pipes imported from Japan are not hurting American steel companies, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled. The panel voted 4 to 2 to dismiss the complaint of six U.S. steelmakers and the United Steelworkers of America. Circular seamless stainless pipes are used in nuclear and conventional power plants, stock lines for petrochemical facilities, pharmaceutical production lines and food-processing equipment.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2000 | Times Wire Services
The U.S. International Trade Commission rejected a complaint by domestic steelmakers that imports from Japan and five other countries are harming the U.S. industry, handing a rare victory to foreign steel producers. The ITC voted 5-1 not to impose duties on imports of cold-rolled steel, used in such products as cars and home appliances. That allowed Japan's Nippon Steel Corp.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The Commerce Department, in a preliminary decision, plans to impose duties of as much as 50% on automotive- and appliance-steel imports from Indonesia, Turkey and three other countries, ruling that the metal is being sold at unfairly low prices in the U.S. The decision marks a hopeful development for U.S. steelmakers seeking to limit imports that soared from countries whose economies have been troubled.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1998 | Reuters
U.S. steelmakers and workers accused producers in Russia, Japan and Brazil of dumping steel in the U.S. market and asked the government to impose hefty duties on the imports. The United Steelworkers of America union joined 12 U.S. steel companies in filing what they said was the first of a number of cases in protest of surging steel imports that are forcing domestic production cutbacks and layoffs.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2000 | Associated Press
Circular seamless stainless pipes imported from Japan are not hurting American steel companies, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled. The panel voted 4 to 2 to dismiss the complaint of six U.S. steelmakers and the United Steelworkers of America. Circular seamless stainless pipes are used in nuclear and conventional power plants, stock lines for petrochemical facilities, pharmaceutical production lines and food-processing equipment.
NEWS
September 5, 1999 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sight of Chinese characters stenciled in yellow chalk on the side of heavy steel beams was enough to make Dick Zampa's blood boil. "Who in the hell in their right mind," he fumed, "would have thought they were going to get this stuff from China?" The "stuff" was steel. Tons and tons of steel destined for the underbellies of California's toll bridges that the state is spending more than $2.5 billion to strengthen for earthquake safety.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Brazil agreed to curtail exports to the U.S. of a key steel product used in cars and appliances to avoid tariffs that would have priced its steelmakers out of the U.S. market. The agreement--which U.S. steelmakers denounced as inadequate--calls for Brazil's two largest steel producers to suspend shipments of hot-rolled steel until October, then cut annual exports by 28% for five years. It will also establish minimum prices for the imports. The U.S.
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