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NATIONAL
July 27, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- A man caught out on the street during massive storms that tore through New York City and surrounding areas died Thursday night when a church steeple in Brooklyn was struck by lightning, causing scaffolding to collapse on him. It was one of two deaths blamed on storms Thursday that thundered through the eastern edge of the country. They were preceded by hours of warnings from state and local officials who braced for a "derecho" similar to the devastating weather that struck  Washington, D.C., last month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
To expand service, cellular phone companies are turning to a higher power. They're not increasing the wattage of their transmitters. They're looking for churches near residential areas willing to let them hide cell sites in steeples, belfries and crosses. Wireless companies are hunting for new sites as they scramble to close gaps in phone reception and expand their networks to meet the explosion of smartphones and tablets. Conventional cellphone towers in neighborhoods are often opposed as eyesores, and sometimes banned.
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TRAVEL
August 12, 2007 | By Joe Robinson, Special to The Times
Bagan, Myanmar My body was already a waterfall, and it was only 10:15 a.m. in the oven of Bagan, former imperial capital of Myanmar. Standing on the pedals of my rented one-speed girl's bike with a leopard-print seat, I dripped up an incline, passed a couple of bullocks on death's door pulling an ancient wooden cart and then swerved off the asphalt into sand as an air-conditioned bus filled with grinning foreign tourists blew by. The backdraft stirred...
NATIONAL
July 27, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- A man caught out on the street during massive storms that tore through New York City and surrounding areas died Thursday night when a church steeple in Brooklyn was struck by lightning, causing scaffolding to collapse on him. It was one of two deaths blamed on storms Thursday that thundered through the eastern edge of the country. They were preceded by hours of warnings from state and local officials who braced for a "derecho" similar to the devastating weather that struck  Washington, D.C., last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
If members of Malibu Presbyterian Church needed any inspiration, it was in plain sight Sunday when the Rev. Greg Hughes stepped to the front of the congregation's temporary sanctuary. At his feet lay the twisted, blackened spire that topped the church's steeple when a brush fire engulfed the Malibu Canyon Road church Oct. 21, 2007, and burned it to the ground. "It's like it was yesterday. I can taste ash in my mouth," Hughes told a crowd of 450 gathered to give thanks for the 63-year-old congregation's survival and to break ground for a new sanctuary.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2001
The article on Alamos, Mexico ('Pleasure of the Sierra Madra," Jan. 28), and the letters that followed ('Ardent About Alamos," Feb. 18) prompted me to send you this story, told down there when we used to go in the late '60s: Apparently, decorating the church steeple was a problem for the founders, so the Spanish brides each donated a plate from the china sets they brought with them when Alamos was a thriving silver mining town. During the Mexican Revolution, the soldiers used the dishes, embedded decoratively on the steeple, for target practice.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | BARBARA BAIRD, Times Staff Writer
Every now and then, someone rings the doorbell at St. Jive's-by-the-Sea and asks where to find the church's social service programs for the needy. But these visitors have to be redirected down the street to the St. Joseph Center, for St. Jive's is neither a church nor a social service agency. Easily mistaken for a house of worship because of its name and church architecture, complete with steeple, St. Jive's is the home and studio of Venice artist Annette Bird.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999
Remember air raid sirens? They were mounted on tall poles so their warning could be heard all over a neighborhood. And what about church bells? Well, they were placed in lofty steeples so their call to worship could reach far into the countryside. So why would the city of Ventura choose to maintain a noise generator like a pistol range right in the middle of a residential area, on a cliff much higher than any pole or steeple? So that the maximum number of residents, taxpayers, voters would have their yards and homes invaded by the disturbing sound of gunfire?
NATIONAL
February 13, 2005 | From Associated Press
The year was 1913 and Woodrow Wilson was in the White House when a tornado struck the nation's capital, damaging the steeple of a downtown church. It took some time -- 92 years, to be exact -- but this weekend, repairs are being made at Calvary Baptist Church. The church made a deal with local developers, selling its parking lot and other land for $10 million to go toward construction as well as preservation of the 1867 church sanctuary, which was formed by abolitionists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ
The First Baptist Church and members of the Highland Light Homeowners Assn. both walked away from this week's City Council meeting unhappy with the council's decision to allow the church to construct a 29-foot-high lighthouse steeple. The church had requested permission to build a 33-foot-high steeple, but homeowners objected, saying that any structure higher than 25 feet would obstruct their views and lower their property values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
If members of Malibu Presbyterian Church needed any inspiration, it was in plain sight Sunday when the Rev. Greg Hughes stepped to the front of the congregation's temporary sanctuary. At his feet lay the twisted, blackened spire that topped the church's steeple when a brush fire engulfed the Malibu Canyon Road church Oct. 21, 2007, and burned it to the ground. "It's like it was yesterday. I can taste ash in my mouth," Hughes told a crowd of 450 gathered to give thanks for the 63-year-old congregation's survival and to break ground for a new sanctuary.
TRAVEL
August 12, 2007 | Joe Robinson, Special to The Times
My body was already a waterfall, and it was only 10:15 a.m. in the oven of Bagan, former imperial capital of Myanmar. Standing on the pedals of my rented one-speed girl's bike with a leopard-print seat, I dripped up an incline, passed a couple of bullocks on death's door pulling an ancient wooden cart and then swerved off the asphalt into sand as an air-conditioned bus filled with grinning foreign tourists blew by.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2005 | From Associated Press
The year was 1913 and Woodrow Wilson was in the White House when a tornado struck the nation's capital, damaging the steeple of a downtown church. It took some time -- 92 years, to be exact -- but this weekend, repairs are being made at Calvary Baptist Church. The church made a deal with local developers, selling its parking lot and other land for $10 million to go toward construction as well as preservation of the 1867 church sanctuary, which was formed by abolitionists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2002 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Church officials have won Newport Beach's approval to build Orange County's first Mormon temple, ending a yearlong controversy over the height of a steeple. "We're very pleased with the results of the meeting," Weatherford T. Clayton, president of the church's Newport Beach stake, said Wednesday, a day after the City Council unanimously approved plans for the 17,575-square-foot temple at 2300 Bonita Canyon Drive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2002 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mormons' quest to build a temple with a towering steeple in residential Newport Beach was bolstered Wednesday by a favorable city report that concludes the 12-story-high spire fits with the building's architecture and won't require special approval. The size of the steeple, topped by a golden statue of a trumpet-blowing angel, has angered some nearby residents who fear it will dominate their hillside skyline and decrease property values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2001 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lincoln Heights bell that sat silent for about 20 years will have a chance to ring again--at its home at Sacred Heart Church rather than the new Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. In May, Cardinal Roger M. Mahony wrote a letter to the parishioners of Sacred Heart expressing an interest in the bell for the new downtown Los Angeles cathedral that will be inaugurated next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2002 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mormons' quest to build a temple with a towering steeple in residential Newport Beach was bolstered Wednesday by a favorable city report that concludes the 12-story-high spire fits with the building's architecture and won't require special approval. The size of the steeple, topped by a golden statue of a trumpet-blowing angel, has angered some nearby residents who fear it will dominate their hillside skyline and decrease property values.
TRAVEL
June 12, 1988 | JUDITH MORGAN, Morgan, of La Jolla, is a magazine and newspaper writer
I was not trying to be holier than thou, or anyone else, but I did go to church every day while in London. I ate in church. I shopped in church. I saw Roman ruins and the Queen Mother in church. I read marble tributes to poets and kings, and dropped coins into wooden boxes for the restoration of walls and stained glass. I leaned against pillars to stretch my back, and to keep from toppling over while I stared into the clouds of domed ceilings. I cut through one of my favorite gardens--St.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2001
The article on Alamos, Mexico ('Pleasure of the Sierra Madra," Jan. 28), and the letters that followed ('Ardent About Alamos," Feb. 18) prompted me to send you this story, told down there when we used to go in the late '60s: Apparently, decorating the church steeple was a problem for the founders, so the Spanish brides each donated a plate from the china sets they brought with them when Alamos was a thriving silver mining town. During the Mexican Revolution, the soldiers used the dishes, embedded decoratively on the steeple, for target practice.
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