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Stefan Eriksson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2006 | Richard Winton and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Sheriff's deputies have arrested the Swedish video game executive who crashed in a rare Ferrari in Malibu in February, alleging that he didn't own that car and others in his $3.5-million exotic car collection, authorities said Sunday. Stefan Eriksson faces grand theft charges after detectives raided his gated Bel-Air estate Friday night, spent six hours searching it and then took him into custody Saturday night.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2006 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors on Tuesday delayed a decision on filing charges against a former Swedish videogame executive arrested on suspicion of grand theft of a rare Ferrari, which crashed in Malibu, and two other exotic sports cars. The prosecutors said they needed a few more days to review complex paperwork on how the vehicles were acquired. Stefan Eriksson, 44, who has been in custody since Saturday, will remain locked up because of an immigration hold issued by U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2006 | Richard Winton and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
The mystery deepened Monday in the case of the puzzling crash last week of a $1-million Ferrari Enzo on Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu. Sheriff's detectives said Monday that they believe a gun's magazine discovered near the wreckage is connected to the crash, and they plan to interview an unnamed person who they believe was in the car with Swedish game machine entrepreneur Stefan Eriksson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2006 | Richard Winton and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Sheriff's deputies have arrested the Swedish video game executive who crashed in a rare Ferrari in Malibu in February, alleging that he didn't own that car and others in his $3.5-million exotic car collection, authorities said Sunday. Stefan Eriksson faces grand theft charges after detectives raided his gated Bel-Air estate Friday night, spent six hours searching it and then took him into custody Saturday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2006 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors on Tuesday delayed a decision on filing charges against a former Swedish videogame executive arrested on suspicion of grand theft of a rare Ferrari, which crashed in Malibu, and two other exotic sports cars. The prosecutors said they needed a few more days to review complex paperwork on how the vehicles were acquired. Stefan Eriksson, 44, who has been in custody since Saturday, will remain locked up because of an immigration hold issued by U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2006 | Richard Winton and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Sheriff's officials investigating the crash of a Ferrari in Malibu last month are asking how a small private transit company could create its own police department and allegedly hand out law enforcement identification to civilians, including the car's owner. According to Yosef Maiwandi, it wasn't as difficult as you might think. The San Gabriel Valley Transit Authority is a tiny, privately run organization that provides bus rides to disabled people and senior citizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2006 | David Pierson and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
Stefan Eriksson's famous exotic car collection keeps shrinking. First, the former European videogame executive's rare Enzo Ferrari was destroyed in a mysterious crash Feb. 21 on Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu. Then, on Sunday, he lost his 2005 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, valued at more than $400,000. Beverly Hills police confiscated the vehicle after Scotland Yard said the car might have been stolen. The officers stopped Eriksson's wife, Nicole Persson, 33, about 2:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2006 | Richard Winton and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Stefan Eriksson had hoped that millions of video gamers would experience the thrill of street racing on a hand-held device he helped develop. But then Eriksson's $1-million Ferrari was totaled, an accident that gamers around the world may see as a cruel metaphor for the collapse of the portable console company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
Immigration officials said Monday that Bo Stefan Eriksson, who nearly two years ago crashed a $1-million Ferrari Enzo while driving at least 162 mph on Pacific Coast Highway, is in custody at an immigration holding facility in Lancaster. According to wire reports Monday night, Eriksson was there awaiting deportation to Sweden or Germany, but local immigration officials declined to comment. Eriksson crashed the Ferrari in February 2006, drawing media attention across the nation, and his eccentric personality fueled the story.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Boris Becker began his rain-delayed defense of the Wimbledon men's championship with a 6-4, 6-2, 6-4 victory over Karel Novacek of Czechoslovakia today, while Stefan Edberg of Sweden won his opening match without losing a game. Edberg, the fourth seed, downed another Swede, Stefan Eriksson, 6-0, 6-0, 6-0. It was the first whitewash at Wimbledon since the open era of tennis began in 1968 and only the third triple-love score in Wimbledon history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2006 | David Pierson and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
Stefan Eriksson's famous exotic car collection keeps shrinking. First, the former European videogame executive's rare Enzo Ferrari was destroyed in a mysterious crash Feb. 21 on Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu. Then, on Sunday, he lost his 2005 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, valued at more than $400,000. Beverly Hills police confiscated the vehicle after Scotland Yard said the car might have been stolen. The officers stopped Eriksson's wife, Nicole Persson, 33, about 2:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2006 | Richard Winton and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Sheriff's officials investigating the crash of a Ferrari in Malibu last month are asking how a small private transit company could create its own police department and allegedly hand out law enforcement identification to civilians, including the car's owner. According to Yosef Maiwandi, it wasn't as difficult as you might think. The San Gabriel Valley Transit Authority is a tiny, privately run organization that provides bus rides to disabled people and senior citizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2006 | Richard Winton and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
The mystery deepened Monday in the case of the puzzling crash last week of a $1-million Ferrari Enzo on Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu. Sheriff's detectives said Monday that they believe a gun's magazine discovered near the wreckage is connected to the crash, and they plan to interview an unnamed person who they believe was in the car with Swedish game machine entrepreneur Stefan Eriksson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2006 | Richard Winton and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Stefan Eriksson had hoped that millions of video gamers would experience the thrill of street racing on a hand-held device he helped develop. But then Eriksson's $1-million Ferrari was totaled, an accident that gamers around the world may see as a cruel metaphor for the collapse of the portable console company.
WORLD
April 4, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The fast-driving Swede who crashed a rare Ferrari on a Southern California highway three years ago has been arrested in his home country on suspicion of theft, assault and extortion. Bo Stefan Eriksson was deported to Sweden last year after serving a prison sentence in the United States, where he had pleaded no contest to charges of drunk driving, embezzlement and illegal gun possession. He became known as the "Ferrari guy" after crashing a $1.5-million Ferrari Enzo into a pole at 162 mph in Malibu in 2006.
MAGAZINE
April 23, 2006
We don't know what was in the CD player when that Ferrari Enzo slammed into a power pole on Pacific Coast Highway, or if Swedish national Stefan Eriksson was listening to the radio--or to whatever it sounds like to go 162 mph through Malibu. Jeff Gehringer is sure about one thing: "I don't see Abba and a Ferrari together," says the music director for the Inland Empire radio station KSPA-AM (1510), which happens to be owned by car collector Art Astor.
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