Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStefano Capriati
IN THE NEWS

Stefano Capriati

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
January 27, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The end came so quickly, so decisively, that Jennifer Capriati didn't have a chance to become nervous, nor did her constant companion, her father and coach, Stefano Capriati, who was sitting close, yet so far away. It made such sense. She always had been so far ahead of her time--whether it was the swift rise at 14, the rapid decline by 17--that match point at the Australian Open shouldn't have been any different.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 3, 2004 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
A voice came out of the stands during Jennifer Capriati's practice session at Roland Garros on Wednesday afternoon. It was Stefano Capriati, who watched his 28-year-old daughter finish a light workout against a hitting partner in preparation for her semifinal match today against Anastasia Myskina of Russia at the French Open. Of course. Hasn't it always been that way? The father and daughter have almost always been in the same zone since Capriati burst onto the pro scene in 1990 at age 13.
Advertisement
SPORTS
June 3, 2004 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
A voice came out of the stands during Jennifer Capriati's practice session at Roland Garros on Wednesday afternoon. It was Stefano Capriati, who watched his 28-year-old daughter finish a light workout against a hitting partner in preparation for her semifinal match today against Anastasia Myskina of Russia at the French Open. Of course. Hasn't it always been that way? The father and daughter have almost always been in the same zone since Capriati burst onto the pro scene in 1990 at age 13.
SPORTS
January 27, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The end came so quickly, so decisively, that Jennifer Capriati didn't have a chance to become nervous, nor did her constant companion, her father and coach, Stefano Capriati, who was sitting close, yet so far away. It made such sense. She always had been so far ahead of her time--whether it was the swift rise at 14, the rapid decline by 17--that match point at the Australian Open shouldn't have been any different.
SPORTS
June 10, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The father of Jennifer Capriati, acknowledging mistakes he made raising the troubled teen-age tennis star, says she will be released next week from a treatment center and again will be a productive player. Capriati, who turned pro just before her 14th birthday, left the tour last year after losing in the first round of the U.S. Open. Now 18, she was arrested on May 16 on marijuana possession charges and is undergoing rehabilitation.
SPORTS
June 30, 1990 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's 14, she misses her friends, she misses her own telephone and she misses her dog, but Jennifer Capriati did not miss her chance to play Steffi Graf at Wimbledon. But she almost did. Capriati blew two match points in the second set, lost a tiebreaker, dropped five consecutive games and trailed Robin White, 0-3, in the third set Friday. Just then, it seemed as if Capriati would be late for a very important date, her first meeting with Graf. Just then, Capriati was thinking something else.
SPORTS
May 27, 1990 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's see, now. What are we to make of this? The future of women's tennis is 14 years old, wears men's size-8 1/2 sneakers, hits the ball so hard it leaves a vapor trail, was a millionaire at 13, has no idea of the words to the national anthem, knows the rap song "Busta Move" by heart, loves pink, thinks negative vibes are gross, practices so hard she gets callouses on her hands and already has an idea of how she wants people to remember her.
SPORTS
April 25, 1990
Jennifer Capriati, the 14-year-old from Florida who reached the final in two of her first three pro tournaments, will play in the Virginia Slims of Los Angeles Aug. 13-19 at Manhattan Beach. Stefano Capriati said that his daughter, already ranked 24th in the world, is committed to playing in the event at Manhattan Country Club. The younger Capriati, from Wesley Chapel, Fla., just north of Tampa, plans to use the Slims tournament as a hardcourt warmup for the U.S. Open, which begins a week later.
SPORTS
August 3, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monica Seles' resurgence last summer in Southern California won't be repeated. In fact, the chronic foot injury that put her out of the Acura Classic and the JPMorgan Chase Open at Manhattan Beach could raise more questions about her tennis future. It was not surprising on Friday when Seles pulled out of next week's tournament at Manhattan Beach.
SPORTS
April 27, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two-time Australian Open champion Jennifer Capriati was removed from the U.S. Fed Cup team by captain Billie Jean King on the eve of its match today against Austria for not agreeing to comply with team rules. The unprecedented development not only leaves the U.S. without its No. 1 player for the weekend competition at Charlotte, N.C., it also forces the U.S. to forfeit Capriati's match against Evelyn Fauth because Capriati's dismissal came after Friday's draw.
SPORTS
June 10, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The father of Jennifer Capriati, acknowledging mistakes he made raising the troubled teen-age tennis star, says she will be released next week from a treatment center and again will be a productive player. Capriati, who turned pro just before her 14th birthday, left the tour last year after losing in the first round of the U.S. Open. Now 18, she was arrested on May 16 on marijuana possession charges and is undergoing rehabilitation.
SPORTS
June 30, 1990 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's 14, she misses her friends, she misses her own telephone and she misses her dog, but Jennifer Capriati did not miss her chance to play Steffi Graf at Wimbledon. But she almost did. Capriati blew two match points in the second set, lost a tiebreaker, dropped five consecutive games and trailed Robin White, 0-3, in the third set Friday. Just then, it seemed as if Capriati would be late for a very important date, her first meeting with Graf. Just then, Capriati was thinking something else.
SPORTS
May 27, 1990 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's see, now. What are we to make of this? The future of women's tennis is 14 years old, wears men's size-8 1/2 sneakers, hits the ball so hard it leaves a vapor trail, was a millionaire at 13, has no idea of the words to the national anthem, knows the rap song "Busta Move" by heart, loves pink, thinks negative vibes are gross, practices so hard she gets callouses on her hands and already has an idea of how she wants people to remember her.
SPORTS
May 7, 1988 | LISA DILLMAN, Special to the Times
What bothered Debbie Graham more than anything else in her tennis match against Jennifer Capriati had little to do with forehands or backhands. No, it was this realization: Whereas Graham is headed for Stanford University next fall, Capriati is headed, well, all the way to seventh grade. "I mean, she was younger than the ball people," Graham said. And, for that matter, Capriati is eight inches shorter than Graham, who is 5-feet 11-inches.
SPORTS
September 18, 1991 | MIKE PENNER
Steffi Graf wins the U.S. Open, becomes the third female to win tennis' Grand Slam, and before she can celebrate by taking in a Broadway play, an East Side restaurant or even a breath of the Manhattan night air, she is dragged aboard a plane back home to Germany by her father. Graf calls it "one of the worst days of my life."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|