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Steffen Heitmann

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November 26, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major blow to Chancellor Helmut Kohl's personal prestige, his handpicked candidate for the German presidency Thursday succumbed to a mounting wave of public criticism and withdrew from the race for the country's highest office. "The decision was mine alone," Steffen Heitmann, the 49-year-old little-known east German politician, told a handful of reporters summoned to an early morning news conference in his hometown of Dresden.
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NEWS
November 26, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major blow to Chancellor Helmut Kohl's personal prestige, his handpicked candidate for the German presidency Thursday succumbed to a mounting wave of public criticism and withdrew from the race for the country's highest office. "The decision was mine alone," Steffen Heitmann, the 49-year-old little-known east German politician, told a handful of reporters summoned to an early morning news conference in his hometown of Dresden.
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NEWS
October 23, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was intended as the candidate of unity, a pious easterner who would make history as the first president elected since the two Germanys became one. Instead, Steffen Heitmann has managed to offend, shock, anger, alienate and outrage everyone from working women to Jews--and the election is still seven months away.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was intended as the candidate of unity, a pious easterner who would make history as the first president elected since the two Germanys became one. Instead, Steffen Heitmann has managed to offend, shock, anger, alienate and outrage everyone from working women to Jews--and the election is still seven months away.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
The largest two political parties in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's ruling coalition meet here next Monday to formally name the Federal Constitutional Court president, Roman Herzog, as their joint candidate to succeed Richard von Weizsaecker as Germany's chief of state next summer.
NEWS
May 17, 1994
Germany will elect its first federal president since the reunification of the former East and West Germanys on Monday. Ballots will be cast by 1,324 delegates, marking the first time since 1969 that Berlin's historic Reichstag building has been used for a federal election. Four candidates are running, and it is expected that the Christian Democratic Union's Roman Herzog, a moderate conservative who currently presides over Germany's constitutional court, will win.
NEWS
November 29, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an embarrassing setback for the ruling coalition of Chancellor Helmut Kohl, the leader of the east German state of Saxony-Anhalt and his Cabinet resigned Sunday over allegations that top state officials were padding their paychecks. The government of Minister-President Werner Muench, a Christian Democrat, mirrors Kohl's coalition of Christian Democrats and Free Democrats that has ruled Germany for 11 years but has been slipping steadily in the polls.
NEWS
November 10, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuesday was the fourth anniversary of the collapse of the Berlin Wall, a historic event that marked both the beginning of the end of the Cold War and Germany's long, brutal division, but Germans did little celebrating.
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An electoral college of 1,324 legislators and "ordinary citizens" will elect Germany's next federal president today in the country's first such election since the unification of the East and West four years ago. Germany's seventh president will have the difficult task of filling the shoes of outgoing President Richard von Weizsaecker, a respected statesman who is the embodiment of how many Germans would like their country to be seen by the rest of the world.
MAGAZINE
January 2, 1994 | Tyler Marshall, Tyler Marshall is The Times' Berlin Bureau chief.
THE LITTLE EAST GERMAN FARMING VILLAGE OF TRANTOW HAS BEEN SCRUBBED FROM ONE END to the other for its big day. Mayor Uta Kruger, who was shifting hay in the nearby fields when the advance team descended on her a week ago, now stands nervously in her Sunday best outside the village inn, listening for the sounds of the helicopter.
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