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Stein Robaire Helm

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BUSINESS
October 10, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Local Ad Agencies to Combine: Kresser/Craig of Santa Monica and Stein Robaire Helm of Los Angeles are merging to form Kresser Stein Robaire. Kresser/Craig Chief Executive Bob Kresser will be CEO of the merged company. Greg Helm, a partner at Stein Robaire Helm, is leaving. The merged agency will operate from Kresser/Craig's Santa Monica office.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Executives Form New Agency: Greg Helm, president of Stein Robaire Helm before its merger last month with Los Angeles-based Kresser/Craig, and John Stingley, senior vice president for creative at Chiat/Day, are teaming up to form Houston Effler Helm Stingley. The new agency, based in Venice, is affiliated with Boston-based Houston Effler. The agency opens with one account, Secure Horizons, formerly with Stein Robaire. Billings are $10 million.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 1994
The newspaper has chosen Los Angeles ad agency Stein Robaire Helm to handle its estimated $2-million account. The agency, which launched Ikea products in the United States, is known for work that is market-driven as opposed to flashy; its most notable efforts have been in direct mail and broadcast ads. The Register formerly managed its advertising account in-house.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Small is getting very big in the ad business. So big, in fact, that a string of recent successes by smaller ad agencies could nudge the rest of the industry to return to its roots. Thursday night, one small agency proved--for the second consecutive year--that it ranks among the giants in Southern California. Stein Robaire Helm, a 7-year-old agency, walked off with the West Coast's premiere ad prize at the 28th annual Belding Awards.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If advertising is geared toward the young, perhaps ad awards should be geared toward young agencies. Such was the case Wednesday night when Stein Robaire Helm, a little-known Brentwood agency that didn't even exist until five years ago--but has since helped turn Ikea into a household name in Southern California--walked off with seven of the West Coast's top ad awards. No other agency won as many.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The room got strangely quiet. At most advertising agencies, that is usually a sign that a client had been lost. But that was hardly the case at the tiny ad firm Stein Robaire Helm. The Los Angeles agency was just weeks old and operating out of a converted apartment with a kitchen that doubled as a conference room. On the kitchen table, Jean Robaire and John Stein had just completed an advertisement for their first client, a wheelchair maker. The unusual ad--which has since appeared in several specialty magazines--has text that winds around everyday obstacles to show the sort of barriers people in wheelchairs face each day. As the two creators stared at the ad, Greg Helm, the agency's president, walked into the room.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Small is getting very big in the ad business. So big, in fact, that a string of recent successes by smaller ad agencies could nudge the rest of the industry to return to its roots. Thursday night, one small agency proved--for the second consecutive year--that it ranks among the giants in Southern California. Stein Robaire Helm, a 7-year-old agency, walked off with the West Coast's premiere ad prize at the 28th annual Belding Awards.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994
The seniors division of Cypress-based PacifiCare Health Systems said it has chosen Torrance-based Saatchi & Saatchi DFS / Pacific to handle its advertising. The account, estimated at $10 million, has been in review since May. The other finalist for the business was Ketchum Advertising in Los Angeles. The account was formerly handled by a group of four agencies: The Design Ranch in Portland, Groves Chaney in San Antonio, Phillips & Johnson in Tulsa and Stein Robaire Helm in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-ranking executive with Kresser Stein Robaire is leaving the Santa Monica advertising agency, formed in a merger eight months ago. Executive Vice President Hugh Duncan, 50, said Thursday that he is leaving to form his own firm, Duncan & Associates. Duncan said he had joined Kresser Stein's predecessor agency, Kresser/Craig, with "the expectation of running the company," but "the division of labor didn't pan out to my expectations."
BUSINESS
February 8, 1994
The newspaper has chosen Los Angeles ad agency Stein Robaire Helm to handle its estimated $2-million account. The agency, which launched Ikea products in the United States, is known for work that is market-driven as opposed to flashy; its most notable efforts have been in direct mail and broadcast ads. The Register formerly managed its advertising account in-house.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If advertising is geared toward the young, perhaps ad awards should be geared toward young agencies. Such was the case Wednesday night when Stein Robaire Helm, a little-known Brentwood agency that didn't even exist until five years ago--but has since helped turn Ikea into a household name in Southern California--walked off with seven of the West Coast's top ad awards. No other agency won as many.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The room got strangely quiet. At most advertising agencies, that is usually a sign that a client had been lost. But that was hardly the case at the tiny ad firm Stein Robaire Helm. The Los Angeles agency was just weeks old and operating out of a converted apartment with a kitchen that doubled as a conference room. On the kitchen table, Jean Robaire and John Stein had just completed an advertisement for their first client, a wheelchair maker. The unusual ad--which has since appeared in several specialty magazines--has text that winds around everyday obstacles to show the sort of barriers people in wheelchairs face each day. As the two creators stared at the ad, Greg Helm, the agency's president, walked into the room.
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