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Stella Rimington

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December 28, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That fictional master spy James Bond, the quintessential male chauvinist intelligence agent, might be found brooding darkly these days at his Pall Mall club. More and more, the espionage specialists who are moving up in the British intelligence services are the Jane Bonds. Britain's MI-5, the Internal Security Service, and MI-6, its overseas espionage network, are increasingly recruiting women. Recently, MI-5 named Stella Rimington its first female director-general.
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January 23, 2005 | Denise Hamilton, Denise Hamilton is the author of the Eve Diamond crime novels, including "Last Lullaby" and the forthcoming "Savage Garden."
Not so long ago, publishers thought women couldn't write thrillers. Espionage novelist Gayle Lynds recalls that her first book, "Masquerade," was turned down in 1994 by the president of one major New York house because "no woman could have written this book." These days, Miss Moneypenny has vaulted from the secretarial desk into the spotlight, leaving James Bond to fetch his own tea. Lynds found another publisher, hit the bestseller lists and never looked back.
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BOOKS
January 23, 2005 | Denise Hamilton, Denise Hamilton is the author of the Eve Diamond crime novels, including "Last Lullaby" and the forthcoming "Savage Garden."
Not so long ago, publishers thought women couldn't write thrillers. Espionage novelist Gayle Lynds recalls that her first book, "Masquerade," was turned down in 1994 by the president of one major New York house because "no woman could have written this book." These days, Miss Moneypenny has vaulted from the secretarial desk into the spotlight, leaving James Bond to fetch his own tea. Lynds found another publisher, hit the bestseller lists and never looked back.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That fictional master spy James Bond, the quintessential male chauvinist intelligence agent, might be found brooding darkly these days at his Pall Mall club. More and more, the espionage specialists who are moving up in the British intelligence services are the Jane Bonds. Britain's MI-5, the Internal Security Service, and MI-6, its overseas espionage network, are increasingly recruiting women. Recently, MI-5 named Stella Rimington its first female director-general.
NEWS
December 17, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Stella Rimington, a career civil servant, has been appointed the first woman to head Britain's MI-5 counterintelligence service, a top-secret agency that has been the subject of many thrillers, movies and television dramas, the government announced Monday. Rimington, who has been with the agency 22 years, will become director general of the Security Service, as MI-5 is formally called, when its current director general, Patrick Walker, retires in February. Rimington is Walker's deputy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1991
With the end of the Cold War comes a new progressiveness in military and security operations. Women in the United States and Britain are gaining access to positions previously reserved for men. This could open up significant new career opportunities for women. It's long overdue, but a fitting acknowledgment of the many contributions of women in military and security matters. The $291-billion defense bill recently signed by President Bush repeals a 1948 law barring women from combat flights.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new British Parliament opened Wednesday with Queen Elizabeth II, wearing her jewel-studded crown, presenting the legislative program of Prime Minister John Major's reelected government. Addressing the House of Lords, the queen said the government would enact further laws to curb labor unions, sell the coal industry, balance the budget and establish a national lottery for worthy causes.
NEWS
May 22, 1997 | Wm. D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Psst! Wanna become a spy catcher? Call 439-5803 in central London. But don't tell a soul (especially if you manage to sneak past the busy signal). And only British citizens may apply. On Wednesday, Britain's counterintelligence service, whose very existence was officially denied for many years, stepped out of the shadows long enough to advertise for agents.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's campaign against terrorism in Northern Ireland suffered an enormous setback early this month when 25 senior officers in the security establishment were killed in a helicopter crash in Scotland. The officers, along with four crew members, died en route from Belfast to Inverness for a top-secret security conference and a major review of the efforts to end violence perpetrated by members of the separatist Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
July 17, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's internal Security Service came out of the shadows Friday in a dramatic public unveiling of an agency that until recently denied its very cloak-and-dagger existence. The 80-year-old Security Service, known as MI5, published a booklet detailing its activities and allowed the director general, Stella Rimington, to be photographed in her heretofore top-secret office. It was the first time a director general had made a public engagement since MI5 was founded in 1909.
BOOKS
February 13, 2005
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST *--* *--* 1 The Broker by John Grisham (Doubleday: $27.95) A 1 4 high-roller attorney is pardoned to lead the CIA to a powerful satellite surveillance system and the shadowy agents who want to buy it. 2 The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown (Doubleday: $24.95) A 2 98 Louvre curator's killing leads to clues hidden in Leonardo's paintings and a secret society with something to hide. 3 State of Fear by Michael Crichton (HarperCollins: $27.
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