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BUSINESS
March 12, 2003 | James Flanigan
For most people thinking about war and terrorism, any mention of the word "cell" conjures up thoughts of enemy agents in our midst. For Dr. Robert Chow, however, the word brings to mind something altogether different: a chance to give hope to the gravely ill. Chow is chairman of StemCyte Inc., an Arcadia start-up firm that specializes in using cord blood stem cells -- the kind taken from the umbilical cords of newborns -- to help treat cancer patients.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2003 | James Flanigan
For most people thinking about war and terrorism, any mention of the word "cell" conjures up thoughts of enemy agents in our midst. For Dr. Robert Chow, however, the word brings to mind something altogether different: a chance to give hope to the gravely ill. Chow is chairman of StemCyte Inc., an Arcadia start-up firm that specializes in using cord blood stem cells -- the kind taken from the umbilical cords of newborns -- to help treat cancer patients.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Theresa and Scott LaRue thought they had four healthy boys until their son Layne contracted Epstein-Barr virus in 1994 and died within two weeks. Trying to understand why Layne suffered such a drastic outcome from a viral infection that is normally much milder, physicians quickly discovered that two other sons--Garrett, then 3 1/2, and Blayke, 6 months--both have severely impaired immune systems. "It came out of nowhere for us," said Theresa LaRue.
HEALTH
May 14, 2001 | DENISE HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Melissa Segal of Studio City became pregnant with her first child, she got lots of advice. But she says one of the most useful tips came from a girlfriend who suggested she bank her newborn's umbilical cord blood. Cord blood is high in stem cells, which are capable of developing into red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2005 | By Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
The courier arrived just after midnight with a bag of blood collected from a fresh umbilical cord. Inside the laboratory at Family Cord Blood Services in Santa Monica, a worker siphoned off red cells, leaving a dilute mixture of stem cells — a personal supply for Olivia Michelle Boyd, born 15 hours earlier in Honolulu. Her parents, Stephanie and Anthony Boyd, had agreed to pay the company $1,265 to harvest the material and $115 a year to preserve it in a stainless steel tank filled with liquid nitrogen.
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