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Sten Sture Andersson

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NEWS
March 13, 1989
Swedish Foreign Minister Sten Sture Andersson shocked the nation with revelations he has been subjected to illegal electronic eavesdropping. He became the first high-ranking politician to corroborate a statement by the government's chief prosecutor, Jan Danielsson, that a number of top Swedish officials were bugged during the so far futile police hunt for the killer of former Prime Minister Olof Palme, slain in 1986. "I know I have been bugged.
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OPINION
May 28, 1989 | Tad Szulc, Tad Szulc, the author of "Fidel" (Morrow), a biography of Fidel Castro, writes on U.S. foreign-policy issues
Secretary of State James A. Baker III told a pro-Israel audience in Washington last week that Israelis will have to forgo visions of a "Greater Israel" and advised them to regard Palestinians as neighbors, enunciating perhaps the strongest U.S. stance to date on the Middle East peace process. Six months after Chairman Yasser Arafat renounced terror "totally and absolutely" by his Palestine Liberation Organization and formally recognized the existence of Israel, international diplomacy is urgently seeking a new breakthrough toward peace in the Holy Land.
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OPINION
May 28, 1989 | Tad Szulc, Tad Szulc, the author of "Fidel" (Morrow), a biography of Fidel Castro, writes on U.S. foreign-policy issues
Secretary of State James A. Baker III told a pro-Israel audience in Washington last week that Israelis will have to forgo visions of a "Greater Israel" and advised them to regard Palestinians as neighbors, enunciating perhaps the strongest U.S. stance to date on the Middle East peace process. Six months after Chairman Yasser Arafat renounced terror "totally and absolutely" by his Palestine Liberation Organization and formally recognized the existence of Israel, international diplomacy is urgently seeking a new breakthrough toward peace in the Holy Land.
NEWS
March 13, 1989
Swedish Foreign Minister Sten Sture Andersson shocked the nation with revelations he has been subjected to illegal electronic eavesdropping. He became the first high-ranking politician to corroborate a statement by the government's chief prosecutor, Jan Danielsson, that a number of top Swedish officials were bugged during the so far futile police hunt for the killer of former Prime Minister Olof Palme, slain in 1986. "I know I have been bugged.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Swedish Foreign Minister Sten Sture Andersson, whose pivotal mediating role helped remove the final obstacles to a U.S.-PLO dialogue, has a reputation for bridging political divides. The affable 65-year-old veteran Socialist politician once marshaled his skills against the United States, winning the support of even the most conservative Swedish political parties for a declaration condemning the American bombing of North Vietnam in the early 1970s.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
For a diplomatic move that reversed U.S. policy in the Middle East, it was, in fact, a cliffhanger in which no one involved seemed quite sure which way the decision would fall until the last moment. For 32 hours, Arab kings and presidents, a fleet of diplomatic minions and two weary Swedish envoys in Geneva and Washington scrambled to shape history.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Palestinian and other Arab diplomats Wednesday hailed the U.S. decision to open a formal dialogue with the Palestine Liberation Organization as a "historic" step that may finally lead to a settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict. "We are very, very happy about this," said Ahmed Abdul-Rahman, the PLO's chief spokesman. "It is a historic change."
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | From Reuters
Swedish Foreign Minister Sten Andersson changed his travel plans after a bomb threat against his country's national airline, Swedish Radio said Sunday. Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) security chief Urban Paulin said Sweden's secret police had received a note threatening an attack on an unspecified plane leaving Paris, where Andersson is attending an international conference on chemical weapons.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Sheinbaum was finally feeling better. He had been in his sickbed in the Regency Hotel for a week. But the news had just flashed on television that President Reagan was ordering the State Department to open a formal dialogue with the Palestine Liberation Organization. Sounding breathless, Sheinbaum pronounced himself greatly relieved. The day before, with much different emotions, he had watched PLO chairman Yasser Arafat's televised speech at the special session of the U.N.
NEWS
September 18, 1989 | From Reuters
Sweden's King Carl Gustav and Queen Silvia will arrive in Jordan today for a six-day state visit expected to improve already warm relations. "We view Sweden as a country with special importance in the European bloc," Information Minister Nasuh Majali said Sunday. "Amman looks for firmer ties and for new openings in bilateral relations." The king and queen will be guests of King Hussein and Queen Noor, who visited Sweden in 1984.
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | From Reuters
Swedish Foreign Minister Sten Andersson changed his travel plans after a bomb threat against his country's national airline, Swedish Radio said Sunday. Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) security chief Urban Paulin said Sweden's secret police had received a note threatening an attack on an unspecified plane leaving Paris, where Andersson is attending an international conference on chemical weapons.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Swedish Foreign Minister Sten Sture Andersson, whose pivotal mediating role helped remove the final obstacles to a U.S.-PLO dialogue, has a reputation for bridging political divides. The affable 65-year-old veteran Socialist politician once marshaled his skills against the United States, winning the support of even the most conservative Swedish political parties for a declaration condemning the American bombing of North Vietnam in the early 1970s.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
For a diplomatic move that reversed U.S. policy in the Middle East, it was, in fact, a cliffhanger in which no one involved seemed quite sure which way the decision would fall until the last moment. For 32 hours, Arab kings and presidents, a fleet of diplomatic minions and two weary Swedish envoys in Geneva and Washington scrambled to shape history.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Sheinbaum was finally feeling better. He had been in his sickbed in the Regency Hotel for a week. But the news had just flashed on television that President Reagan was ordering the State Department to open a formal dialogue with the Palestine Liberation Organization. Sounding breathless, Sheinbaum pronounced himself greatly relieved. The day before, with much different emotions, he had watched PLO chairman Yasser Arafat's televised speech at the special session of the U.N.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Palestinian and other Arab diplomats Wednesday hailed the U.S. decision to open a formal dialogue with the Palestine Liberation Organization as a "historic" step that may finally lead to a settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict. "We are very, very happy about this," said Ahmed Abdul-Rahman, the PLO's chief spokesman. "It is a historic change."
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | Reuters
Czechoslovakia will allow dissident playwright Vaclav Havel to go to Stockholm to receive the 1989 Olof Palme Prize. "We were informed (Friday) by the Prague authorities that Havel has been granted a passport so that he can travel to Sweden to receive the prize," Foreign Ministry spokesman Bo Heineback said. Swedish Foreign Minister Sten Sture Andersson had been scheduled to go to Prague on Thursday to present the $15,000 prize to Havel for his struggle for human rights.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | From Reuters
Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf injected a note of royal outrage today into a growing row with neighboring Norway over the clubbing to death of baby seals. In an almost unprecedented intervention from a monarch with purely ceremonial duties, Carl Gustaf challenged Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland to stop the slaughter. Norwegian seal culling was the subject of a gruesome television documentary shown in Britain, Sweden and other countries last week.
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