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Stendhal Syndrome

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NEWS
November 21, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Last summer, a Swedish tourist visiting Florence's artistic landmarks went to Santa Maria Novella church, a 13th-Century jewel renowned for its dazzling frescoes. Something happened to her in the church. She emerged panic-stricken and disoriented, unable to cope. Doctors who saw her a few hours later recognized the symptoms. They made a quick diagnosis: The Swedish tourist had fallen prey to the Stendhal Syndrome.
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NEWS
November 21, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Last summer, a Swedish tourist visiting Florence's artistic landmarks went to Santa Maria Novella church, a 13th-Century jewel renowned for its dazzling frescoes. Something happened to her in the church. She emerged panic-stricken and disoriented, unable to cope. Doctors who saw her a few hours later recognized the symptoms. They made a quick diagnosis: The Swedish tourist had fallen prey to the Stendhal Syndrome.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Blake Green, Newsday
Fans of "The Waltons" and Richard Thomas, a star of the popular '70s television series, will be jarred to hear the former squeaky-clean John Boy described as looking like "the manager of a pornographic bookshop" or "a meatball cooked in fat." But here it is, 2004, and Thomas, 53, who played a self-described "sexual omnivore" when last seen on the New York stage, has been cast as a spy in "Democracy," Michael Frayn's latest history-based drama to come to Broadway.
AUTOS
February 11, 2004 | DAN NEIL
Tourists who come to the capital of the Italian Renaissance can become so overwhelmed by beauty that they are thrown into a hysterical state known as Stendhal's syndrome, named after the French novelist who, in 1817, was so unmanned by Giotto's ceiling frescoes in Santa Croce he could barely walk home. Stendhal, needless to say, was kind of high maintenance. But maybe I shouldn't talk. When I first saw the 2005 Maserati Quattroporte sedan in Tokyo a few months ago, I just about keeled over.
REAL ESTATE
May 23, 2004 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Gore Vidal, who has had a residence on the Westside for more than 30 years, has put his equally longtime home in Italy on the market at about $17 million. The writer and political commentator, 78, decided to sell his property in Italy, he said, because he had knee surgery and now finds it difficult to use the retreat on a cliff in Ravello, south of Naples overlooking the Amalfi Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1988 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, Associated Press
Sometimes, one can get sick of all that culture during a European vacation. That, anyway, is how it appears to Dr. Graziella Magherini, the head of psychiatry at Santa Maria Nuova Hospital in central Florence. In the past 10 years she has treated more than 115 tourists for what she calls "Stendhal's Syndrome"--an emotional reaction to hundreds of years of history and art, all hitting the traveler at once. "The historical memory in these cities of art stirs the emotions," she says.
REAL ESTATE
August 15, 2004 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Celebrity twins Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen have purchased a Westside home, where they plan to live during school breaks, for close to its $4-million asking price. The actresses are expected to start at New York University in September. While growing up and sharing the role of Michelle on the ABC sitcom "Full House" (1987-95), the twins lived with their family in Encino. The 18-year-old sisters bought a house with walls of glass and city-to-ocean views.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | KEVIN MAYNARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In her surreal, nightmarish directorial debut, "Scarlet Diva" (2000), Asia Argento played a troubled young actress stalked and seduced by men and women who stop at nothing. Among them is an American film producer who claims he wants to cast her in a remake of "Cleopatra" opposite Robert De Niro as Marc Antony but really just wants to get her in bed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2012 | By Scott Timberg
The scene could come from a Sofia Coppola movie: Coolly casual Parisian artist, hanging artwork in a stunning Modernist house overlooking the Silver Lake Reservoir, while a clutch of young, European-accented hipsters with cameras and video recorders swarm around him to capture his every utterance. Before long, new music composed by a member of the electronica band Air drifts across the place. But unlike in "Lost in Translation" or "Somewhere,"this is a set on which it's possible to trip over a large aluminum sculpture of California.
BOOKS
January 6, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
USED to be, if you telephoned the poet Mary Oliver, her partner Molly Cook would invariably answer. She'd ask you to hold on a moment, feign footsteps and return to the phone as Oliver, making no pretense at a different voice (editors across the country routinely played along). Cook was, for many years, Oliver's agent. Oliver, everyone understood, was a bit of a recluse. She needed nature and solitude to create her poems. "Writers must . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005 | Jan Breslauer, Special to The Times
It was the door slam that sent tremors throughout Europe, and eventually America too. Four days before Christmas 1879 in the Royal Theater in Copenhagen, the first audience for "A Doll's House" watched Ibsen's Nora take her leave of husband, home and hearth. And they were shocked. Not only had they just seen a bourgeois wife do the unthinkable, they'd also borne witness to what has been called "the birth of modern drama."
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