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August 10, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
CHOREOGRAPHER Anne Fletcher hadn't been actively looking to make the transition to film director. "It was 'no rush,' " Fletcher said. She'd done choreography for such films as "Bring It On," "The 40 Year-Old Virgin" and "Bringing Down the House" and was "completely content." "The thing about being a choreographer on a film is that you get to work on so many sets with so many different directors, producers, actors and genres," said the 40-year-old native of Detroit.
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NEWS
August 10, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
CHOREOGRAPHER Anne Fletcher hadn't been actively looking to make the transition to film director. "It was 'no rush,' " Fletcher said. She'd done choreography for such films as "Bring It On," "The 40 Year-Old Virgin" and "Bringing Down the House" and was "completely content." "The thing about being a choreographer on a film is that you get to work on so many sets with so many different directors, producers, actors and genres," said the 40-year-old native of Detroit.
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July 21, 1991 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman named Molly changed the face of Lifetime, the basic cable network geared toward women. Three years ago, just 35% of Lifetime's lineup consisted of original programming, the majority of it infotainment progams such as the daily talk show "Attitudes." Lifetime filled up the remainder of its 24-hour, six-day-a-week schedule with old TV series and movies. Then Lifetime decided to become a true competitor with the commercial networks and other basic cable channels.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Paul Marsh wants to see a movie, he doesn't run, or even walk, to the nearest box office. He just picks up the phone. The entertainment analyst at New York-based Cowen & Co. said he uses an automated phone-in service to buy tickets before leaving his house. "I'll be damned if I'm going to go to a movie and stand in line without any assurance of getting a ticket," Marsh said. Although the box office still accounts for the vast majority of the $5 billion in tickets sold at U.S.
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