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Stepan Partamian

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July 6, 2005 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
As first impressions go, you might think you wouldn't want to meet up with Stepan Partamian in a dark alley -- what with his barrel chest, shaved head and ZZ Top bush of a goatee. But in reality, it isn't the dark alley to be worried about. With Partamian, it's the sunny sidewalk cafe, theater lobby, art gallery or, most particularly, the hot seat on one of his cable TV talk shows. With him, it isn't a fist-pounding you risk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2005 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
As first impressions go, you might think you wouldn't want to meet up with Stepan Partamian in a dark alley -- what with his barrel chest, shaved head and ZZ Top bush of a goatee. But in reality, it isn't the dark alley to be worried about. With Partamian, it's the sunny sidewalk cafe, theater lobby, art gallery or, most particularly, the hot seat on one of his cable TV talk shows. With him, it isn't a fist-pounding you risk.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1986 | MARK HENRY, Times Staff Writer
Harry Chitjian, an 85-year-old survivor of the Armenian holocaust, wished that his father could have seen the "glory" as he watched hundreds of his people celebrate their culture and heritage on Sunday afternoon at a Hollywood park. "He wants his father to know that they didn't perish," said Chitjian's daughter, Zaruhy. "He would like his father to know that he is free and alive in the United States." The elderly man's father, mother, three sisters and a brother were among the estimated 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2004 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of Armenian Americans throughout the Los Angeles area commemorated a grim chapter in their history -- the killing of 1.5 million of their countrymen and women by the Turks between 1915 and 1922 -- with protests, prayers, a blood drive and even a rock concert. The events included a solemn ceremony in Montebello, a raucous protest along Wilshire Boulevard and a rally in east Hollywood that some said was more a display of national pride than a somber remembrance of the Armenian genocide.
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September 24, 1998 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The sound is uniquely mournful, a plaintive wail from some timeless source, with a nuanced timbre somewhere between a woodwind instrument and a human voice. It is the duduk, a 1,500-year-old instrument made of apricot wood. The duduk embodies the soul of traditional Armenian musical culture--itself one of the oldest musical cultures on the planet.
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