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Stepfamilies

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cinderella and her stepsisters would feel right at home. Today there are an estimated 100 million people in stepfamilies--a natural outgrowth of the high divorce rate--and most are not happy: 75% of such unions fall apart. The figures are from "A Step Apart," a two-hour documentary hosted by Marlo Thomas, airing at 8 tonight on KTLA-TV Channel 5.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Dr. John Visher, a California psychiatrist whose struggle with remarriage issues led him to co-found a national organization to advocate for stepfamilies, died April 17 at his home in the Bay Area city of Walnut Creek. He was 88. Visher had pancreatic cancer and died of a stroke, according to his daughter, Mary Visher. With his psychologist wife Emily, Visher launched the Stepfamily Assn.
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NEWS
December 23, 1986 | PENELOPE MOFFET
A photographer wanted to take a picture of Kathleen and Steve Hermann at home with the five children from their three prior marriages--his two, her one. Fine. Simple. No problem. Except that 6-year-old Kimberly, Steve's youngest, was with her mother in Huntington Beach that day, and Tracey Schroeder, Kathleen's 13-year-old, had gone off to a ballet class and was late returning. Meanwhile, Steve and his 14-year-old daughter Tiffani had to leave pronto or Tiffani would be overdue at her mother's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emily B. Visher, a psychologist whose co-founding of a national advocacy and support group for stepfamilies was driven in part by her own "Brady Bunch"-style remarriage, died of cancer Oct. 5 at her Walnut Creek home. She was 83. Visher and her husband, John, founded the Stepfamily Assn. of America in 1979 after 20 years of experience, not always successful, combining eight children from previous marriages into their family.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is incest? What is a stepfamily? And what are appropriate and socially acceptable relationships between parents and children who are not related biologically but through marriage or other long-term commitments? The Woody Allen/Mia Farrow/Soon-Yi Farrow Previn love triangle makes for good party chatter and bad jokes but, because they are high-profile personalities, the media blitz has also opened the door to debate on a different kind of "family values"--those of stepfamilies.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | JOAN LIBMAN, Joan Libman regularly writes on family issues for the View section
It was Brandy Van Zitter's elementary school graduation, a seemingly commonplace family celebration. Since she became part of a stepfamily, however, it took 2 1/2 years of putting hurt feelings aside and learning to cooperate before getting two biological parents, two stepparents, and a variety of aunts, uncles and cousins in the same room at the same time. The turning point wasn't lost on the youngster. "It used to be lonely, having parties without one of my parents.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | SHERRY ANGEL
Starting out with realistic expectations is one of the most important steps toward building a successful stepfamily, says Andrea Kaye, a Santa Ana marriage and family therapist. It takes a lot of work--usually over a period of at least three to five years--to make a stepfamily feel like one, well-blended entity, says Kaye, who is a stepmother herself.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At first, Rose had no idea that she was putting her stepchildren through culture shock when she tried to make conversation with them at the dinner table. She and Ted had just been married and, hoping to get off to a good start, had moved his two teen-agers and her two younger children into a new home. Rose had looked forward to getting to know her stepchildren better during the dinner hour, which had always been a time for animated talk in her family.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People seeking to be recognized as a family unit can now register with the state of California under a novel system that supporters say could benefit thousands of diverse households, including gay couples, foster parents and stepfamilies. For a $10 filing fee, any family--traditional or not--can receive an ornate color certificate bearing a gold state seal that declares the household an association called the "Family of (Doe)," a spokesman for the secretary of state's office said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | GERALDINE BAUM and MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It would be easy to assign some kind of symbolism to the fate of fashion designer Carolyne Roehm and her husband, Henry Kravis, the king of Wall Street acquisitors. As the Gatsbys of their time, they epitomized the roaring '80s and the newly moneyed set known as Manhattan's "Nouvelle Society." They had the homes: four, including the $5.5-million Park Avenue apartment and the pre-Revolutionary Connecticut getaway with the $7-million barn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A widow whose husband died without a will must share his property with his half siblings, even though he never knew of their existence, the California Supreme Court reluctantly decided Thursday. The court ruled in the case of the late Denis H. Griswold, a Santa Barbara resident who was born out of wedlock and whose biological father paid child support for 18 years.
NEWS
December 10, 1999 | From Washington Post
Jim Borgeld and Christy DeYoung sat down at the kitchen table last year to announce to their respective kids--all six of them, all younger than 8--that they had decided to get married. They went on to explain what would change and what would not. Borgeld and DeYoung, both previously divorced, thought they were prepared for a smooth blending of their families. Like many people in their position, they were dead wrong.
HEALTH
November 29, 1999 | SHARI ROAN
The girls' empowerment movement is one of the most positive public health trends in the country these days, and the multitude of health books for girls is proof. It's possible to find a good book for a girl on almost any aspect of physical or psychological health. Some of the latest offerings include two new books from Pleasant Co., which has set the standard for girls' health with its American Girl magazine and library of books.
REAL ESTATE
July 14, 1996 | LISA TAYLOR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Taylor is an Orange County free-lance writer
It was love and a second chance at marriage that prompted Ketrin Grimes to move in 1992 from her Los Angeles Art Deco apartment of 12 years and into the 1918 Highland Park Craftsman bungalow of new husband Jerry Earwood. Ketrin, who works at the Los Angeles Police Department's training academy, had done lots of restoration in her apartment, had decorated it in the Art Deco style and says she "could have lived there forever."
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | MARY GUTHRIE
After arriving at a church party in their new neighborhood, the couple drifts to opposite ends of the get-together. She strikes up a conversation about her two children. He talks to a friend about his four children. How many children do they have? Members of their new church puzzle over the conflicting numbers. Actually, they add up to five, three from his prior marriage, one they had together, and one from her previous marriage. Welcome to the world of step families.
NEWS
October 6, 1993 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen years ago, when therapists Emily and John Visher founded the Stepfamily Assn. of America, they were struck by how little some people knew about stepfamilies. One colleague called their interest a gimmick. An attorney argued that John could not be a stepfather unless the biological father had died. A teacher, noticing their son had a different last name, called them in for a conference suggesting he was not receiving enough love.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Avoiding her father's sharp gaze, a Garden Grove teen-ager testified Wednesday that she gunned down her sleeping stepmother in their home five years ago because her father told her: "If you love me, you'll do this for me." Cinnamon Brown, 19, recounted how her father allegedly reviewed details of the murder plan for months beforehand and then, in the early morning hours of March 19, 1985, woke her and declared: "It has to be done tonight."
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It should have been the perfect family vacation. Anne, Phil and Phil's 7-year-old son were at a remote resort in Western Canada, the kind of place that shows up on postcards. There were horseback rides, swims in the lake, sunset strolls and giant cook-outs. There was a campfire, there were hayrides--and one day, there were 16 phone calls from Phil's ex-wife in Chicago.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | SUSAN HOWLETTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was 2 a.m. on a December morning in 1988 when Kathy Mahoney finally placed a stamp on the letter that would alter life's course for the young Irvine widow and her two little girls. A few weeks later, Brian Killelea tackled the painful task of answering the pile of condolence mail that poured in after a drunk motorist ran down his wife, Debbie, in the alley behind their Balboa Peninsula home. "What I want to tell you is that you will survive," read Mahoney's letter. "Someday you will be happy."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cinderella and her stepsisters would feel right at home. Today there are an estimated 100 million people in stepfamilies--a natural outgrowth of the high divorce rate--and most are not happy: 75% of such unions fall apart. The figures are from "A Step Apart," a two-hour documentary hosted by Marlo Thomas, airing at 8 tonight on KTLA-TV Channel 5.
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