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Stephan Balkenhol

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December 15, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
German artist Stephan Balkenhol looks startled if you ask him a question that's remotely personal--he looks as though it's never happened before. Reserved and soft-spoken, the 39-year-old artist is as inscrutable as his work. A sculptor who creates solitary figures carved from wood, Balkenhol crafts people who do nothing and stare blankly back at the viewer with facial expressions so resolutely neutral they verge on aggression. In L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
German artist Stephan Balkenhol looks startled if you ask him a question that's remotely personal--he looks as though it's never happened before. Reserved and soft-spoken, the 39-year-old artist is as inscrutable as his work. A sculptor who creates solitary figures carved from wood, Balkenhol crafts people who do nothing and stare blankly back at the viewer with facial expressions so resolutely neutral they verge on aggression. In L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephan Balkenhol's carved wood figures initially seem to be nothing more than large-scale versions of the ubiquitous knickknacks sold in souvenir shops at popular vacation spots. His roughly cut sculptures, however, maintain a strangely humane dignity that makes it easy for us to confuse them with real people--if only momentarily. The young German sculptor achieves this uncanny effect by forgoing strict verisimilitude.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Artists, like other people who do manual work, often say that they like to keep their hands busy so that their minds are free to do other things. At Regen Projects, a wonderful group of carved wooden figures and reliefs by German sculptor Stephan Balkenhol embodies this complex experience of hands-on distraction. When your attention is absorbed by the immediate physical activity in which your body is engaged, it's impossible for others to know just what you're thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Comic-book characters leap from two dimensions into three in Yoshitomo Nara's fascinating installation at Blum & Poe Gallery. Mounted on the walls like trophies from big-game hunts, the young artist's sculptures of larger-than-lifesize heads depicting cartoon kids (and a dog) seem to spring to life--but only until you realize that art is no more alive than Saturday morning cartoons, Sunday comics or the costumed characters at Disneyland.
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August 22, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
During some four decades as an increasingly major center for contemporary art, Los Angeles has had its share of talented dealers. Their galleries have provided essential public platforms for artists and their work. This week, the city lost one of the most gifted when Stuart Regen succumbed to the ravages of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Regen was barely 39, but in slightly more than eight years' time his West Hollywood gallery had assumed a critical position in L.A.'s burgeoning art-ecology.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2008 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
Contrary to popular belief, the sculpture of the ancient world was intensely colorful, with statues, friezes and decorative objects regularly covered in brilliant pigments intended to enhance their lifelike qualities. But as curator Roberta Panzanelli explains in the fascinating catalog for "The Color of Life: Polychromy in Sculpture From Antiquity to the Present," now at the Getty Villa, it was the Renaissance and the Neoclassical era -- the two major periods of classical revival -- that shaped our understanding of ancient sculpture, and neither was particularly disposed to color.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm meet those of contemporary art in the sculpture of German artist Stephan Balkenhol--and why not? All three spent their formative teen years in the once-lovely, now gritty town of Kassel. Jacob (1785-1863) and Wilhelm (1786-1859) Grimm are local heroes. For Balkenhol, 45, Kassel meant youthful immersion in Documenta 4, the legendary exhibition of Post-Minimal and Conceptual art that galvanized many who saw it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Silence hangs about Stephan Balkenhol's new sculptures at Regen Projects, and silence tends to raise suspicions. What is being suppressed, what secrets concealed, held back? Balkenhol's wood-carved human figures, smaller or larger than life but never life-size, stand singly, with declaratory presence. They seem about to proclaim themselves, announce their identities, roles or reasons for being, yet they are mute.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Christopher Knight, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
The 1995 Carnegie International exhibition is something of a puzzlement. This 52nd outing of the periodic survey of recent art looks at the work of 36 artists; it includes 15 sculptors, 13 painters and eight camera artists--photography, film, video--a good number of them first-rate. Why, then, does it feel so flat and uninspired?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Dori and Joseph DeCamillis have been on the art festival circuit for years. No, you wouldn't have seen their work at Documenta or the Venice Biennale or Art Basel. We're talking the Lakefront Festival of Arts in Milwaukee, the Gasparilla Festival in Tampa, Fla., the Cherry Creek Arts Festival in Denver.
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