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Stephane Audran

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
One of the key pleasures of the Danish film "Babette's Feast," which won the Oscar for best foreign film, is that it is a personal triumph for its star, French actress Stephane Audran. She will forever be associated with the droll thrillers of her former husband, Claude Chabrol, who has always been fascinated with the connection between bourgeois repression and violent crime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Director Claude Chabrol, one of the founders of the New Wave movement that revolutionized French cinema, died Sunday. He was 80. Christophe Girard , who is responsible for cultural matters at Paris City Hall, announced Chabrol's death. No cause was given. Chabrol made more than 70 films and TV productions during his long career. His first feature-length movie, "Le Beau Serge," made in 1957, helped establish the New Wave, which would include such influential directors as Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Director Claude Chabrol, one of the founders of the New Wave movement that revolutionized French cinema, died Sunday. He was 80. Christophe Girard , who is responsible for cultural matters at Paris City Hall, announced Chabrol's death. No cause was given. Chabrol made more than 70 films and TV productions during his long career. His first feature-length movie, "Le Beau Serge," made in 1957, helped establish the New Wave, which would include such influential directors as Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
One of the key pleasures of the Danish film "Babette's Feast," which won the Oscar for best foreign film, is that it is a personal triumph for its star, French actress Stephane Audran. She will forever be associated with the droll thrillers of her former husband, Claude Chabrol, who has always been fascinated with the connection between bourgeois repression and violent crime.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Les Bonnes Femmes," one of Claude Chabrol's earliest and best films, screens today through Wednesday at the Nuart with a new 35-millimeter print. Made in 1960 but unreleased in Los Angeles until 1976 and seen rarely, if ever, since then, "Les Bonnes Femmes" (Good Time Girls) today seems feminist in spirit, as Chabrol, in his third feature, explores the drab existences of four Paris shop girls.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS
Le Boucher (1970) Bravo, Thursday at 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. In this suspense thriller concerned with the dualism in human nature, Claude Chabrol, at the top of his form, plays for all its worth the contrast between the loveliness of rural southwestern France and the friendliness and kindliness of its inhabitants and a series of grisly murders that strike a small community. Stephane Audran and Jean Yanne star. America, America (1963) Bravo, Saturday at 2 p.m.
NEWS
September 8, 1996 | Michael Wilmington
In Gabriel Axel's exquisite adaptation of the Isak Dinesen story of two elderly Danish sisters who have sacrificed their chances at love and fame for a life of abstinence and good deeds; of their deviously devout father; of their French cook, Babette (Stephane Audran, pictured with Lars Lohmann), who has sacrificed culinary glory for faithful service in their penurious kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A well-dressed woman with a haunted look steps almost by chance into a small Paris bar. Hours later she leaves with a man she's picked up, both of them smashed, headed for a place in Versailles he knows. Age 28, without a profession, a nonstop smoker and drinker, Betty, for that is her name, has the look of a one-woman lost generation, a wasted Piaf waif out on the town.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the beginning of the aptly named "Maximum Risk," a solid, fast-moving action-adventure, Jean-Claude Van Damme is running for his life through ancient, narrow streets in a town in the South of France only to wind up dead. How can it be? The picture has barely started and the star has been killed. We then find none other than Van Damme peering down at his own grave. Aha! Van Damme is playing identical twins.
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