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Stephane Grappelli

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NEWS
April 30, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, Bill Kohlhaase is a free-lance writer who regularly covers jazz for the The Times Orange County Edition.
Even as he approaches his 85th birthday, Stephane Grappelli continues to be much like his music: always on the move and full of turns and changes. "My nature is like a gypsy," the violinist said last week by phone from Ft. Worth, Tex., where he appeared at the city's Caravan of Dreams performance space. "I like to travel, you know, maybe not as much as I used to, but I still like to keep moving and like to change. After three days anywhere, I'm ready to go somewhere else."
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NEWS
March 13, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
As stubborn specters go, one could do far worse than Django Reinhardt's. Even guitarist Bireli Lagrene would have to agree -- though it has taken him some time to arrive at that conclusion. Lagrene emerged on the international music scene as an earnest, ink-eyed prodigy channeling Reinhardt's trademark chug-a-chug rhythms and his joyous soul. He's been tailed by Reinhardt's spirit since he was 7.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His elegant, Old World demeanor was the first thing one noticed about Stephane Grappelli. In an art that has sometimes been given to visual and aural excess, the veteran French jazz violinist had the look of a sweet but rakish grandfather. With a smile as captivating as that of Maurice Chevalier and a luminous, almost ecstatic involvement with his music, Grappelli--who died in Paris on Monday at the age of 89--was a walking advertisement for the sheer joy of playing jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1997 | ERIC BRACE, THE WASHINGTON POST
After my father arrived in this country from France 50 years ago, one of his first nonessential purchases was a record by the Quintet of the Hot Club of France. The bubbling speedball swing of guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli took him back to his Paris childhood, and to the night at the Salle Pleyel concert hall when he saw them performing Le Jazz Hot.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1997 | ERIC BRACE, THE WASHINGTON POST
After my father arrived in this country from France 50 years ago, one of his first nonessential purchases was a record by the Quintet of the Hot Club of France. The bubbling speedball swing of guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli took him back to his Paris childhood, and to the night at the Salle Pleyel concert hall when he saw them performing Le Jazz Hot.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What becomes a legend most? When the legend is Stephane Grappelli, the answer is simple: It's what made him a legend in the first place.
NEWS
March 13, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
As stubborn specters go, one could do far worse than Django Reinhardt's. Even guitarist Bireli Lagrene would have to agree -- though it has taken him some time to arrive at that conclusion. Lagrene emerged on the international music scene as an earnest, ink-eyed prodigy channeling Reinhardt's trademark chug-a-chug rhythms and his joyous soul. He's been tailed by Reinhardt's spirit since he was 7.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's the best song to describe Stephane Grappelli at age 83? "Don't Get Around Much Anymore"? "Old Rockin' Chair's Got Me"? "On the Road Again" is more like it. The man known as the grandseigneur of jazz violin is in the middle of a monthlong U.S. tour that stops at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano tonight and the Strand in Redondo Beach on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | DON HECKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Age may not have quite taken the crown in Friday night's heavyweight championship fight between Evander Holyfield and comeback hopeful George Foreman, but it was a no-contest winner the same evening at the Coach House. French jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli, whose smooth cheeks are almost as cherubic as Foreman's, gave a performance that was overflowing with enthusiasm and sheer love of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1988 | A. JAMES LISKA
An evening spent in the company of the music of violinist Stephane Grappelli is much like a reunion with an old lover: It is reassuringly comfortable and familiar, with enough surprises to sustain inordinate interest. As the first artist to perform in this season's "Sounds of Genius" series Monday night at the Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena, the 80-year-old Grappelli lived up to his billing through his jaunty explorations of a series of pop tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His elegant, Old World demeanor was the first thing one noticed about Stephane Grappelli. In an art that has sometimes been given to visual and aural excess, the veteran French jazz violinist had the look of a sweet but rakish grandfather. With a smile as captivating as that of Maurice Chevalier and a luminous, almost ecstatic involvement with his music, Grappelli--who died in Paris on Monday at the age of 89--was a walking advertisement for the sheer joy of playing jazz.
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
Jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli, whose mid-1930s partnership with the legendary guitarist Django Reinhardt in the Quintet of the Hot Club of France resulted in some of the first important jazz performances to emerge from players born outside the United States, died Monday in Paris. According to his manager, Michel Chouanard, Grappelli died of complications after undergoing a hernia operation. He was 89.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What becomes a legend most? When the legend is Stephane Grappelli, the answer is simple: It's what made him a legend in the first place.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, Bill Kohlhaase is a free-lance writer who regularly covers jazz for the The Times Orange County Edition.
Even as he approaches his 85th birthday, Stephane Grappelli continues to be much like his music: always on the move and full of turns and changes. "My nature is like a gypsy," the violinist said last week by phone from Ft. Worth, Tex., where he appeared at the city's Caravan of Dreams performance space. "I like to travel, you know, maybe not as much as I used to, but I still like to keep moving and like to change. After three days anywhere, I'm ready to go somewhere else."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | DON HECKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Age may not have quite taken the crown in Friday night's heavyweight championship fight between Evander Holyfield and comeback hopeful George Foreman, but it was a no-contest winner the same evening at the Coach House. French jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli, whose smooth cheeks are almost as cherubic as Foreman's, gave a performance that was overflowing with enthusiasm and sheer love of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's the best song to describe Stephane Grappelli at age 83? "Don't Get Around Much Anymore"? "Old Rockin' Chair's Got Me"? "On the Road Again" is more like it. The man known as the grandseigneur of jazz violin is in the middle of a monthlong U.S. tour that stops at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano tonight and the Strand in Redondo Beach on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The only difference between this year's Stephane Grappelli concert at the Beverly Theatre and last year's or 1985's, is that he is now more than halfway through his 80th year. Perhaps the voice was a little weaker Monday evening, but the technical finesse when he played remained unimpaired; he seemed to swing Django Reinhardt's "Daphne" more vigorously at 79 than he did at 78. In general, though, almost nothing had changed. Toujours les memes chansons; toujours le meme trio.
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
Jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli, whose mid-1930s partnership with the legendary guitarist Django Reinhardt in the Quintet of the Hot Club of France resulted in some of the first important jazz performances to emerge from players born outside the United States, died Monday in Paris. According to his manager, Michel Chouanard, Grappelli died of complications after undergoing a hernia operation. He was 89.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1988 | A. JAMES LISKA
An evening spent in the company of the music of violinist Stephane Grappelli is much like a reunion with an old lover: It is reassuringly comfortable and familiar, with enough surprises to sustain inordinate interest. As the first artist to perform in this season's "Sounds of Genius" series Monday night at the Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena, the 80-year-old Grappelli lived up to his billing through his jaunty explorations of a series of pop tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The only difference between this year's Stephane Grappelli concert at the Beverly Theatre and last year's or 1985's, is that he is now more than halfway through his 80th year. Perhaps the voice was a little weaker Monday evening, but the technical finesse when he played remained unimpaired; he seemed to swing Django Reinhardt's "Daphne" more vigorously at 79 than he did at 78. In general, though, almost nothing had changed. Toujours les memes chansons; toujours le meme trio.
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