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Stephanie Culp

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NEWS
November 28, 1991 | TIM BLANGGER, THE ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL
Attention shoppers, harried, overworked, stressed-out workers and everyone in between: Stephanie Culp has some advice: Streamline. What, you ask? Aren't streamlines those silver bullet-like travel trailers? Or maybe remnants of an overused design fad from the Cold War '50s? Guess again, says Culp, who didn't mind, in the middle of the acquisition-crazy '80s, telling folks that "the key concept for the '90s is going to be streamlining." And she believes she was right.
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MAGAZINE
October 8, 2000 | DEBRA J. HOTALING
Say this story is about you. And after you read this, you toss it into a cardboard box containing all those other stories about you. And when the cardboard box is full, you slog it out to the garage to live with your other many-storied boxes. What do we have here? A mess and, possibly, a fire hazard. But for Stephanie Culp, professional organizer extraordinaire, it's another day at the office.
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NEWS
September 10, 2000
Carla Hall's article about women who are childless by choice ("To Have or Have Not," Sept. 3) was refreshing in that it helped affirm that I am not the only woman on Earth who is looked upon with suspicion because I have my freedom rather than children. Unfortunately, Ms. Hall concluded by apparently agreeing with one of the biggest stereotypes of all, that women who choose not to have children experience "some sadness, some grief over deciding never to bear children." Speak for yourself, Ms. Hall.
NEWS
September 10, 2000
Carla Hall's article about women who are childless by choice ("To Have or Have Not," Sept. 3) was refreshing in that it helped affirm that I am not the only woman on Earth who is looked upon with suspicion because I have my freedom rather than children. Unfortunately, Ms. Hall concluded by apparently agreeing with one of the biggest stereotypes of all, that women who choose not to have children experience "some sadness, some grief over deciding never to bear children." Speak for yourself, Ms. Hall.
MAGAZINE
October 8, 2000 | DEBRA J. HOTALING
Say this story is about you. And after you read this, you toss it into a cardboard box containing all those other stories about you. And when the cardboard box is full, you slog it out to the garage to live with your other many-storied boxes. What do we have here? A mess and, possibly, a fire hazard. But for Stephanie Culp, professional organizer extraordinaire, it's another day at the office.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1988 | Jane Applegate
Somewhere on everyone's list of New Year's resolutions is usually a pledge to get better organized. And, according to two professional organizers, busy small business owners are notorious for letting papers pile up and files overflow. Dan Stamp, president and founder of Priority Management Systems Inc., and Stephanie Culp, founder of the Organization, suggest spending a few hours today, digging out and getting organized for the new year.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS
America's cornucopia of plenty too often results in useless plethora, giving rise to a book such as Stephanie Culp's creative and humorous guide. Author of a previous work on ways to create order from chaos, Culp draws on her experiences as the owner of The Organization, a business that tidies up people's lives. She begins by describing some of her clients.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 1989 | Sam Hall Kaplan
CRAFTSMANSHIP IS BACK in vogue, thanks in part to a heightened design consciousness, the historic preservation movement and, simply, the appreciation of materials lovingly wrought. As the authors note in an introduction that serves as an engagingly brief history of interior design, interest in craftsmanship has been cyclical and at present is a positive reaction of sorts against the standardization and mass production of recent decades. That stated, the authors methodically review craftsmanship by the medium--metal, paint, stone, and marble, tile, wood, plaster and glass.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | TIM BLANGGER
Stephanie Culp, author of "Streamlining Your Life: A 5-Point Plan for Uncomplicated Living," offers the following tips: * Adjust your attitude. Stop thinking you can't change things. You can change your life, but first you have to adjust your attitude. * Learn to prioritize. Then make a habit of prioritizing every thing, person and obligation on an ongoing basis. * Eliminate all that is unnecessary.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS
How to Get Organized When You Don't Have the Time by Stephanie Culp (Writer's Digest Books: paperback, $9.95). Stephanie Culp has taken on an intrinsically dreary subject--orderly closets, tidy files, a place for everything and everything in its place--and makes it all seem exciting, even enticing.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | TIM BLANGGER, THE ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL
Attention shoppers, harried, overworked, stressed-out workers and everyone in between: Stephanie Culp has some advice: Streamline. What, you ask? Aren't streamlines those silver bullet-like travel trailers? Or maybe remnants of an overused design fad from the Cold War '50s? Guess again, says Culp, who didn't mind, in the middle of the acquisition-crazy '80s, telling folks that "the key concept for the '90s is going to be streamlining." And she believes she was right.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS
America's cornucopia of plenty too often results in useless plethora, giving rise to a book such as Stephanie Culp's creative and humorous guide. Author of a previous work on ways to create order from chaos, Culp draws on her experiences as the owner of The Organization, a business that tidies up people's lives. She begins by describing some of her clients.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 1989 | Sam Hall Kaplan
CRAFTSMANSHIP IS BACK in vogue, thanks in part to a heightened design consciousness, the historic preservation movement and, simply, the appreciation of materials lovingly wrought. As the authors note in an introduction that serves as an engagingly brief history of interior design, interest in craftsmanship has been cyclical and at present is a positive reaction of sorts against the standardization and mass production of recent decades. That stated, the authors methodically review craftsmanship by the medium--metal, paint, stone, and marble, tile, wood, plaster and glass.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1988 | Jane Applegate
Somewhere on everyone's list of New Year's resolutions is usually a pledge to get better organized. And, according to two professional organizers, busy small business owners are notorious for letting papers pile up and files overflow. Dan Stamp, president and founder of Priority Management Systems Inc., and Stephanie Culp, founder of the Organization, suggest spending a few hours today, digging out and getting organized for the new year.
NEWS
July 28, 1993
Regarding "Living Close to the Edge" (June 27): I admit I was shocked. It's disgraceful that a woman who has worked 16 years at a job makes only $4.75 an hour and that having enough to eat has become a privilege rather than a basic human right. However, people need to wake up and accept some responsibility for themselves. If you are truly worried about having enough to feed your family, how do you justify sinking them further into poverty by bearing 14 children? Parents must think of the quality of life they can provide their offspring.
REAL ESTATE
July 3, 2005 | Mark Kendall, Special to The Times
The key to a successful move is to start preparing as soon as you know you're moving, advises Stephanie Culp, a professional organizer based in Temecula. "Every day, go through something, even if it's just two shelves in the linen closet," said Culp, author of "How to Conquer Clutter." "Typically what people do is they wait till the last minute, and they throw anything and everything into a box." Start by going through the house, room by room, and getting rid of stuff. And don't forget the yard.
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