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Stephanie George

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1999
A deputy district attorney can use her maiden name on the ballot in her race for Superior Court judge against her former boss, a judge ruled Wednesday. Superior Court Judge Tully Seymour rejected arguments that the candidate should either be listed by her married name or thrown off the ballot. "I think she always had the maiden name and always had the right to use it," Seymour said, allowing the candidate to run as Stephanie George. The suit was filed by retired Marine Lt. Col. Otto Schmidlen.
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NEWS
March 8, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Based on early, unofficial election returns Tuesday night, Deputy Dist. Atty. Stephanie George was leading her one-time boss, former Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi, in a race for a Superior Court judgeship, one of an unprecedented seven seats decided in Orange County judicial elections. According to early results, George led Capizzi 61% to 39%. Capizzi and George were among 18 candidates vying for seats in the wake of a rash of retirements.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1999 | JERRY HICKS
Good attorneys don't always make wise politicians. In his bid for a Superior Court judgeship, former Dist. Atty. Mike Capizzi has blundered by allowing his backers to take his opponent to court over a meaningless issue they had no chance of winning. Capizzi has now riled his adversaries to align against him, and disappointed some already on his side. Wednesday, a judge threw out a pro-Capizzi petition with comments just short of calling the whole thing frivolous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI and SANDY YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An unprecedented number of Orange County judgeships are up for grabs next month in judicial elections that feature a bid by the county's former top prosecutor and a rare attempt to oust a sitting judge. Candidates are competing for seven Superior Court judgeships, six of them open because of a rash of retirements. The seventh seat is held by incumbent H. Warren Siegel, who is being challenged by two candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2000
Re "Capizzi Move Backfires: He Gives Foe Publicity," Dec. 30 column by Jerry Hicks: Hicks rightly condemns the pro-Capizzi lawsuit against Stephanie George for running under her maiden name as "against the American grain of fair play" but then opines that Capizzi could be a fair judge. Talk about your non sequiturs! I would think that an innate and uncompromising sense of fair play would be an absolute minimum requirement for a judge. Capizzi obviously doesn't qualify. Maybe Capizzi needs to learn to accept women on their merits without meddling in their personal decisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a lawsuit that pulls attention to itself because of the person it doesn't name, a retired Marine lieutenant colonel has sued to force a candidate for Orange County Superior Court judge to use her married name on the March ballot. This is not just any judicial race. Stephanie George Deamon is running against former Dist. Atty. Mike Capizzi, a defeated candidate for state attorney general. Although his name does not appear in the suit, he is the one who most profits if it succeeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired Marine lieutenant colonel has filed suit in an attempt to force a candidate for Orange County Superior Court judge to use her married name on the March ballot. This is not just any judicial race. Stephanie George Deamon is running against former district attorney and defeated candidate for state attorney general Michael Capizzi. Although his name does not appear in the suit, he is the one who most profits if it is successful.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Based on early, unofficial election returns Tuesday night, Deputy Dist. Atty. Stephanie George was leading her one-time boss, former Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi, in a race for a Superior Court judgeship, one of an unprecedented seven seats decided in Orange County judicial elections. According to early results, George led Capizzi 61% to 39%. Capizzi and George were among 18 candidates vying for seats in the wake of a rash of retirements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI and SANDY YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An unprecedented number of Orange County judgeships are up for grabs next month in judicial elections that feature a bid by the county's former top prosecutor and a rare attempt to oust a sitting judge. Candidates are competing for seven Superior Court judgeships, six of them open because of a rash of retirements. The seventh seat is held by incumbent H. Warren Siegel, who is being challenged by two candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1986 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
When a firefighter called Wednesday evening to say that her husband had been found slumped in his car, apparently in a "diabetic stupor," Stephanie George of Villa Park was both startled and concerned. But as the phone conversation continued, the pieces just didn't seem to fit together. For one thing, "my husband isn't diabetic," George said Friday. For another, the firefighter said the man wore glasses and had a mustache.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2000
Re "Capizzi Move Backfires: He Gives Foe Publicity," Dec. 30 column by Jerry Hicks: Hicks rightly condemns the pro-Capizzi lawsuit against Stephanie George for running under her maiden name as "against the American grain of fair play" but then opines that Capizzi could be a fair judge. Talk about your non sequiturs! I would think that an innate and uncompromising sense of fair play would be an absolute minimum requirement for a judge. Capizzi obviously doesn't qualify. Maybe Capizzi needs to learn to accept women on their merits without meddling in their personal decisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1999 | JERRY HICKS
Good attorneys don't always make wise politicians. In his bid for a Superior Court judgeship, former Dist. Atty. Mike Capizzi has blundered by allowing his backers to take his opponent to court over a meaningless issue they had no chance of winning. Capizzi has now riled his adversaries to align against him, and disappointed some already on his side. Wednesday, a judge threw out a pro-Capizzi petition with comments just short of calling the whole thing frivolous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A deputy district attorney can use her maiden name on the ballot in her race for Superior Court judge against her former boss, a judge ruled Wednesday. Superior Court Judge Tully Seymour made it clear early in the 45-minute hearing where his sympathies lay, knocking down the plaintiffs' arguments as to why the candidate should either be listed by her married name or thrown off the ballot entirely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a lawsuit that pulls attention to itself because of the person it doesn't name, a retired Marine lieutenant colonel has sued to force a candidate for Orange County Superior Court judge to use her married name on the March ballot. This is not just any judicial race. Stephanie George Deamon is running against former Dist. Atty. Mike Capizzi, a defeated candidate for state attorney general. Although his name does not appear in the suit, he is the one who most profits if it succeeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired Marine lieutenant colonel has filed suit in an attempt to force a candidate for Orange County Superior Court judge to use her married name on the March ballot. This is not just any judicial race. Stephanie George Deamon is running against former district attorney and defeated candidate for state attorney general Michael Capizzi. Although his name does not appear in the suit, he is the one who most profits if it is successful.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1995
A Brea insurance agent faces up to six years in prison on theft and forgery convictions for collecting $48,000 in premiums over more than two years for policies he never wrote for a business customer. Anthony Wayne Sherer, 29, who remains free on his own recognizance after pleading guilty Wednesday to six felony counts, will be sentenced Oct. 27 by Orange County Municipal Judge Carla Singer.
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