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Stephanie Gilliland

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NEWS
September 30, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
In her camouflage cargo pants, muscle T and with multiple piercings, dancer-choreographer Stephanie Gilliland looks ready for combat. Or at least ready to assume her place at the forefront of the rough-and-tumble world of hyperphysical dance. Indeed, having founded the locally based contemporary troupe Tongue nearly eight years ago, Gilliland, 52, has not only rolled with the artistic punches, she's also been choreographing her own brand of iconoclastic dances for more than two decades.
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NEWS
September 30, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
In her camouflage cargo pants, muscle T and with multiple piercings, dancer-choreographer Stephanie Gilliland looks ready for combat. Or at least ready to assume her place at the forefront of the rough-and-tumble world of hyperphysical dance. Indeed, having founded the locally based contemporary troupe Tongue nearly eight years ago, Gilliland, 52, has not only rolled with the artistic punches, she's also been choreographing her own brand of iconoclastic dances for more than two decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
Los Angeles Festival Director Peter Sellars says he had a multicultural dream he wanted to give to the local concert dance community. "How about drawing together five of L.A.'s emerging black, Asian, Latino and Anglo choreographers and offering them an unprecedented chance to make a collaborative piece for the festival?" he says. But working together hasn't been so easy, according to the five choreographers associated with the project, called the Dance Collective.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1999 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Tongue," as partially defined by Webster's, is a "system of terms used by people sharing a culture." How felicitous, then, that locally based dancer-choreographer Stephanie Gilliland should appropriate the word for her new dance company, whose culture is marked by a devotion to fanatical risk, zealous energy and superb movement skills. Tongue creates a crash-and-burn experience that leaves the viewer gasping for breath.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1999 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Tongue," as partially defined by Webster's, is a "system of terms used by people sharing a culture." How felicitous, then, that locally based dancer-choreographer Stephanie Gilliland should appropriate the word for her new dance company, whose culture is marked by a devotion to fanatical risk, zealous energy and superb movement skills. Tongue creates a crash-and-burn experience that leaves the viewer gasping for breath.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1996 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
If dancer-choreographer Stephanie Gilliland were a gymnast going to the Summer Olympics, there would be little doubt she would nail her landings. Together with dancers Aimee Flora and Vince Hederman, Gilliland not only nailed landings, but also twisted, tumbled and assumed sculptural poses Isamu Noguchi would have envied in "Incline," a hypnotic, hyperphysical work that premiered at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica as part of the "Sweat! (New Dance From L.A.)" series Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
Crisp, urgent and mysterious, Young-Ae Park's gestures imbued "Da Mong" ("Dream Layers") with a precision and directness missing in several other pieces on the Choreographers Showcase program on Saturday at Barnsdall Park Gallery Theatre. Her body stilled but never slack, Park used her hands to portray the life span of an insect. They stirred the air, came to rest on her tilted, "sleeping" head and fluttered with subtle control.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001
* The Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company of San Francisco bridges East and West on April 27 in Marsee Auditorium, El Camino College, 16007 Crenshaw Blvd., Torrance. $10 to $22. (310) 329-5345. Also April 28 in the Performing Arts Center, Cal State Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff St. $9 to $15. (818) 677-2488. * Stephanie Gilliland's TONGUE Dance Company premieres "Big Manuel" April 26 to 29 at Highways Performance Space, 1651 18th St., Santa Monica. $15. (310) 315-1459.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1994 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The third annual Lester Horton Dance Awards, which honor "all movement-based art" presented in public in the Los Angeles area in 1993, were presented Saturday by the Dance Resource Center of Greater Los Angeles at the Japanese Cultural and Community Center. The awards for outstanding achievement include, but are not limited to, ballet, modern, ethnic, jazz and tap dance. This year's awards also celebrate dance staging, dance teaching and dance writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1992 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Bella Lewitzky was the big winner Sunday when the first Lester Horton Awards were announced by the Dance Resource Center, a service organization in the arts community. The awards, an event honoring local accomplishment over the past year, were scheduled to be presented at Cal State Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1996 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
If dancer-choreographer Stephanie Gilliland were a gymnast going to the Summer Olympics, there would be little doubt she would nail her landings. Together with dancers Aimee Flora and Vince Hederman, Gilliland not only nailed landings, but also twisted, tumbled and assumed sculptural poses Isamu Noguchi would have envied in "Incline," a hypnotic, hyperphysical work that premiered at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica as part of the "Sweat! (New Dance From L.A.)" series Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
Los Angeles Festival Director Peter Sellars says he had a multicultural dream he wanted to give to the local concert dance community. "How about drawing together five of L.A.'s emerging black, Asian, Latino and Anglo choreographers and offering them an unprecedented chance to make a collaborative piece for the festival?" he says. But working together hasn't been so easy, according to the five choreographers associated with the project, called the Dance Collective.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL
Except for her assaultive, engulfing woman's quartet "Coriolanus," the pieces presented by Stephanie Gilliland at Cal State L.A. on Friday proved far too thoughtful and complex for her program title, "Raw and to the Bone." This locally based postmodernist clearly identifies with the risk-oriented, stamina-testing movement theater gathering converts in the community.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1991 | JAN BRESLAUER
Although the entire repertory of the Pacific Dance Ensemble, a three-year-old company directed by Danielle Shapiro, consists of new works from various choreographers, new and innovative were hardly the bywords of the mixed bill presented at Cal State Los Angeles during the weekend. However dissimilar in style, the three premieres on the program suffered from the uneven skills of the ensemble as well as a lack of choreographic invention.
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