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April 6, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Serendipity can play strange tricks. During a recent visit to the Dana Point Resort, a 6-month-old luxury hotel on the coast just south of Laguna Niguel, the nightclub area known as Burton's turned out to be the temporary residence of a splendid singer, Stephanie Haynes. An Orange County favorite for many years, Haynes makes such an immediate impression with her elegant gown and personal charm that one finds oneself hoping for the best.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Good news for Southland fans of jazz singing: Stephanie Haynes is back. Or, at least, she was back on Saturday night at Spazio for her first performing engagement in more than six months. Now a resident of Las Vegas, Haynes has been surprisingly inactive recently for an artist with her admirable skills. Unfortunately, despite a track record that consistently revealed all the attributes necessary for first-rate jazz vocalizing, her career never quite took off the way it should have.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Good news for Southland fans of jazz singing: Stephanie Haynes is back. Or, at least, she was back on Saturday night at Spazio for her first performing engagement in more than six months. Now a resident of Las Vegas, Haynes has been surprisingly inactive recently for an artist with her admirable skills. Unfortunately, despite a track record that consistently revealed all the attributes necessary for first-rate jazz vocalizing, her career never quite took off the way it should have.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask Stephanie Haynes about the state of jazz singing these days, and she responds with a pause, a noncommittal murmur and a couple more hesitations before answering. "Well, it's not exactly what I'd like to hear," she says. "And when Teri Thornton died, it took away a good part of the quality singing that was left." Haynes typically doesn't elect to mention that her singing, highly praised by critics for years, continues to be one of the great pleasures of the genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1994 | DON HECKMAN
It's no secret that Los Angeles has a large number of first-rate jazz performers who have difficulty finding work, much less landing a recording contract. Music business professionals offer various explanations: a surplus of talent, the complexities of developing new artists, and so on. In the case of singer Stephanie Haynes, however, the only logical rationale for her mystifying absence from the roster of a major jazz record label has to be a kind of mass executive auditory myopia.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE, Bill Kohlhaase is a free-lancer who writes about jazz for The Times Orange County Edition.
You think you were busy before Christmas. Singer Stephanie Haynes, who lives in San Juan Capistrano, says she traveled "about 600 miles" making gigs during one week in December, with a club date in Rancho Cucamonga on Sunday, the grand opening of a Japanese nightclub in Torrance on Tuesday, a stop at Chadney's in Burbank on Wednesday and a weekend engagement at a new nightspot, Central Park West, in Brentwood.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Bill Kohlhasse is a Marina del Rey writer
Singer Stephanie Haynes has her own version of the popular bumper sticker: "So many tunes, so little time," she complains good-naturedly. Haynes has a strong commitment to the American songbook in general, and jazz standards in particular, matched by few vocalists. "I'm not going to do a Stevie Wonder number anymore," she said. "I sang pop tunes when I started working professionally, but never again."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1997
On Monday night, a group of seasoned jazz musicians will perform to help one of their own, jazz singer Stephanie Haynes. Haynes, who has no health insurance, was hit with big medical bills after an undisclosed illness last month. "[Being uninsured] is a common thing with musicians," said Jack Prather, who organized the event to help cover her expenses. Because she is recovering from surgery, Haynes will not attend.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1994
To answer Leonard Feather's questions, "Where have all the great jazz singers gone?" and "Where are the new jazz singers coming from?" ("We Need a Unique Stylist, Not a Clone," Dec. 25), the finest female jazz singer I know of is alive and well and right here in Southern California. Her name is Stephanie Haynes. The audience is held spellbound as soon as the first notes are sung. But she doesn't just sing a lyric--she gets inside of it and lives it. She sings in Los Angeles and Orange counties, often accompanied by Dave Mackay, at such places as Leows Santa Monica, Lunaria, Jazz Bakery and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1987 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Jazz has found a new home in Orange County in the unlikely confines of a British-themed restaurant in Westminster that specializes in continental cuisine. The Court of St. James, formerly Victoria Station, has been refurbished and will begin nightly jazz bookings tonight, starting with vocalist Shelley Moore and the Gerard Hagen Four. Also due at the Court of St. James this week are guitar duo George Van Eps and Tony Rizzi, singer Stephanie Haynes and the New York Jazz Connection quartet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Fans of jazz singing will find no better place to satisfy their musical cravings than Ca Del Sole Ristorante in North Hollywood. The restaurant's intimate performance room programs singers seven nights a week (with an occasional instrumental evening thrown in for variety) featuring such talented local artists as Julie Kelly, Stephanie Haynes, Sandra Booker and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1997
On Monday night, a group of seasoned jazz musicians will perform to help one of their own, jazz singer Stephanie Haynes. Haynes, who has no health insurance, was hit with big medical bills after an undisclosed illness last month. "[Being uninsured] is a common thing with musicians," said Jack Prather, who organized the event to help cover her expenses. Because she is recovering from surgery, Haynes will not attend.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephanie Haynes is some singer. Her luxuriant alto is capable of rich tones, she subtly transmits the deepest meaning of a lyric, and she can fool with both rhythm and melody, giving an old song a new look. No wonder her many fans think of her as one of the finest vocalists--not just in Southern California--but anywhere. Haynes has had a wide range of experience, singing everything from R&B and Brazilian to what might be called light opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1994 | DON HECKMAN
It's no secret that Los Angeles has a large number of first-rate jazz performers who have difficulty finding work, much less landing a recording contract. Music business professionals offer various explanations: a surplus of talent, the complexities of developing new artists, and so on. In the case of singer Stephanie Haynes, however, the only logical rationale for her mystifying absence from the roster of a major jazz record label has to be a kind of mass executive auditory myopia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer Stephanie Haynes has taken matters into her own hands. Her three previous recordings, including the critically praised 1989 release, "Here's That Rainy Day" with pianist Cedar Walton on the Trend/Discovery label, were all for someone else's label. But her latest, "Two on a Swing," is all her own. "I pretty much know what the situation is today with the recording companies--both the majors and the independents," she explains, over the phone from her home in San Juan Capistrano.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1994
To answer Leonard Feather's questions, "Where have all the great jazz singers gone?" and "Where are the new jazz singers coming from?" ("We Need a Unique Stylist, Not a Clone," Dec. 25), the finest female jazz singer I know of is alive and well and right here in Southern California. Her name is Stephanie Haynes. Although influenced by some great predecessors, she has a unique and sophisticated style that is distinctly her own--no tricks, gimmicks or smoke and mirrors but a beautiful, richly textured voice that has matured into a finely crafted instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1994
To answer Leonard Feather's questions, "Where have all the great jazz singers gone?" and "Where are the new jazz singers coming from?" ("We Need a Unique Stylist, Not a Clone," Dec. 25), the finest female jazz singer I know of is alive and well and right here in Southern California. Her name is Stephanie Haynes. Although influenced by some great predecessors, she has a unique and sophisticated style that is distinctly her own--no tricks, gimmicks or smoke and mirrors but a beautiful, richly textured voice that has matured into a finely crafted instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1994
To answer Leonard Feather's questions, "Where have all the great jazz singers gone?" and "Where are the new jazz singers coming from?" ("We Need a Unique Stylist, Not a Clone," Dec. 25), the finest female jazz singer I know of is alive and well and right here in Southern California. Her name is Stephanie Haynes. The audience is held spellbound as soon as the first notes are sung. But she doesn't just sing a lyric--she gets inside of it and lives it. She sings in Los Angeles and Orange counties, often accompanied by Dave Mackay, at such places as Leows Santa Monica, Lunaria, Jazz Bakery and others.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Bill Kohlhasse is a Marina del Rey writer
Singer Stephanie Haynes has her own version of the popular bumper sticker: "So many tunes, so little time," she complains good-naturedly. Haynes has a strong commitment to the American songbook in general, and jazz standards in particular, matched by few vocalists. "I'm not going to do a Stevie Wonder number anymore," she said. "I sang pop tunes when I started working professionally, but never again."
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