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Stephanie Shroyer

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Stephanie Shroyer can't help herself. No matter what the subject is, she's always looking for a universal human experience. "I want to learn how to get along on this planet," the director says simply. "I strive to make connections, to share the human experience."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Stephanie Shroyer can't help herself. No matter what the subject is, she's always looking for a universal human experience. "I want to learn how to get along on this planet," the director says simply. "I strive to make connections, to share the human experience."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pacific Theatre Ensemble's third annual production of "The Long Christmas Dinner," Thornton Wilder's extraordinary memory play, sweeps aside the usual batch of gooey holiday theater sentiments with profound simplicity. Dinner is spread out for us in the ensemble's tiny second space in Venice, bedecked with a few quilts, a china cabinet, a dinner table and seven intelligent actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC EMERITUS
The enchanted plays of French playwright Jean Giraudoux have suffered from neglect in recent decades, both here and in France. Perhaps it's because they're too fanciful for a world mired in disasters. Perhaps their metaphors seem too airy in the face of the violence that grips us daily. Perhaps their cast lists simply tend to be too long. As any visitor to the Pacific Resident Theatre Ensemble's current revival of the 1939 "Ondine" could attest, the loss is all ours.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1998
First produced in 1932, "The Great Magoo," a vintage potboiler by Ben Hecht and Gene Fowler, now at the 24th Street Theatre, is a Damon Runyon wannabe that would have been better off gathering dust in the archives. The action opens in Coney Island at the height of the Great Depression. Nicky (Jay Karnes), a womanizing barker and songwriter, has fallen hard for hoochie-coochie dancer Julie (Julia Campbell), an ambitious entertainer whose sights are set on the Great White Way.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES
The intrusion of the future on a surrealistically fluid present is a lot like pit bulls, vipers and bad grammar--all are things to be accepted but hardly embraced. At least that's the initial view from the conservative member of a trio of female explorers in 1888 who undertake a metaphysical trek through time and space in 24th Street Theatre's playful, energetic revival of "On the Verge."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
Pacific Resident Theatre Ensemble's new production of Georges Feydeau's farce "There's One in Every Marriage" is so good you almost wish it would go on forever. And sometimes it seems as if it will. Divided into three long and laborious acts, Feydeau's text (here translated and adapted by Suzanne Grossman and Paxton Whitehead) lacks the swift pace modern audiences have come to expect from farce.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2004 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
Is this a theater or a sick ward? Characters in "Chekhov x 4" -- four early one-acts, presented on the Antaeus Company's cozy new North Hollywood stage -- can't go long without complaining of gout, palpitations, foggy vision or assorted aches and pains. In Chekhov, of course, these are never purely physical maladies but symptoms of some deeper distress. In "The Proposal," a high-strung suitor (Arye Gross) asks for the hand of a neighbor's daughter (Angela Goethals) and loses feeling in a leg.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
Welcome to Eden Court, a terribly ordinary trailer park on the border of Virginia and Maryland where the beers are plentiful and so are the mice, marijuana and marital disagreements. "Eden Court," by Murphy Guyer, debuted at the Humanas Festival at the Actors Theatre of Louisville six years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
In his first role in America, Maurice Barrymore played the hero in Augustin Daly's immensely popular 1867 "Under the Gaslight." Daly saw the production and later brought Barrymore back to his Fifth Avenue Theatre in New York, where Barrymore eventually met Georgie Drew, with whom he founded the Barrymore theatrical dynasty. "Under the Gaslight" helped establish Daly's company as one of the most popular of the mid-19th Century.
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