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Stephanie Tolleson

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SPORTS
May 3, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Monica Seles was released from a hospital in Hamburg, Germany, and flew to the United States Sunday, two days after a man leaped from the stands and stabbed her in the back during a tournament match. Seles, 19, the top-ranked women's player in the world, did not suffer a major injury, but she will miss one to three months of tennis. Her agent, Stephanie Tolleson, said Seles was feeling "a little better" but would remain under medical supervision for an "undetermined period of time."
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SPORTS
January 23, 2004 | Lisa Dillman
The JPMorgan Chase Open in Carson has been sold to the Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) by IMG, the management firm. Sources said the sale price was approximately $4.5 million for the Tier II event, the designation given to a tournament with a minimum prize money of $585,000. Dates for the tournament this year are July 19-25.
SPORTS
August 13, 1993 | Associated Press
Monica Seles, sidelined since being stabbed by a fan in April, will be unable to defend her U.S. Open title, and it is unclear when she will return to daily competition, her doctors said Thursday. Seles, who also won the U.S. Open in 1991, had been undergoing rehabilitation here since she was assaulted. "She is not ready to return to competitive tennis," Drs. Richard Steadman and Richard Hawkins said in a statement.
SPORTS
September 26, 1991 | From Associated Press
Top-seeded Emilio Sanchez of Spain overcame Martin Jaite of Argentina, 2-6, 7-6 (6-3), 6-4, Wednesday to advance to the quarterfinals of the $300,000 Assn. of Tennis Professionals tournament at Palermo, Sicily. Also advancing were Marian Vajda of Czechoslovakia, who beat No. 5 Guillermo Perez-Roldan of Argentina, 6-2, 6-4; Diego Nargiso of Italy, who defeated Rodolphe Gilbert of France, 6-4, 4-6, 6-1, and No. 8 Thomas Muster of Austria, who swept Roberto Azar of Argentina, 6-1, 6-3.
SPORTS
July 10, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
More than two months after being stabbed in the back, Monica Seles still can't hit a tennis ball and may not be able to defend her U.S. Open title at New York Aug. 30-Sept. 12. "Doctors have told me there's just no way to know," Seles' agent, Stephanie Tolleson, said Friday. "She's continuing her rehabilitation, and there's no real effective way to anticipate when she'll be ready to play again." Seles said in a written statement: "I wish I could play right now.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1999 | DIANE SEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephanie Tolleson prefers fading into the sidelines while her star clients, such as tennis sensation Venus Williams, wow crowds. Compared with Williams, who sports eye-catching outfits and a 100-mph serve, Tolleson attracts little public recognition in her button-down business attire. But when it comes to the who's who of women's professional tennis, Tolleson lands on just about everybody's list.
SPORTS
May 30, 1993 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the French Open slides into its second week on a layer of red dust, the only thing hotter than the mustard they lace on the hot dogs at the concession stands is the next Monica Seles rumor. Monica is coming to dinner here on Tuesday. Monica is not hurt badly. Monica is going to retire. Monica is in need of a psychiatrist. Monica is hurt much worse than anyone realizes. Monica is feuding with the tennis establishment.
SPORTS
August 8, 1993 | JOHNETTE HOWARD, WASHINGTON POST
It's been 13 weeks since tennis diva Monica Seles first arrived here amidst heavy security, swaddled in a blanket as she stepped off a private jet from Europe, nursing a stab wound she'd suffered two days earlier in a horrific courtside attack in Hamburg. Except for a brief news conference soon afterward, then a statement released by her management firm on July 8, Seles hasn't been heard from since. But townspeople in Vail have seen her.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2003 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
She was the chosen one, the African American prodigy with the celestial name. She rose from humble beginnings in Compton to win two Olympic gold medals, take Wimbledon by storm and sign a shoe deal making her one of the highest-paid athletes of all time. Venus Williams, 22, was unquestionably the world's best female tennis player. Kid sister Serena seemed to tag along -- good enough to give chase on the court, but mostly adding novelty to the most famous sister act in sports. No more.
SPORTS
August 11, 1991 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Monica Seles arrived in Southern California late last month, she walked off the airplane in San Diego and strolled unnoticed past Raquel Giscafre, the tournament promoter who had gone to meet her. "I thought I needed glasses," Giscafre said. Actually, there was nothing wrong with her eyes. But there was something wrong with Seles' hair, which isn't that much longer than Sinead O'Connor's. On that trip, though, Seles' hair was very long and very blond. And it wasn't really her hair.
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