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Stephanie Tombrello

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephanie Sablan did all the right reading before she gave birth to her baby girl: how to feed her, how to lay her down to sleep, even how to safely secure her in a car seat. But six months after Lauren's birth, Sablan is still full of questions when it comes to her child's safety during travel. "She sits upright, and her head falls forward," Sablan explained Monday while shopping for car seat accessories at Buena Park Mall. "When the seat reclines, it rocks forward. How do you correct that?"
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NEWS
July 18, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vast majority of child restraint seats come with directions recommending the use of an additional device, a locking clip. Few auto safety devices are more difficult to use or surrounded by looser federal regulations than locking clips, even though the clips are supposed to be essential to child safety. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration certifies child safety seats, but under no circumstances does it base certifications on the use of locking clips in tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1992 | MARTIN MILLER with staff reports
STRAP 'EM IN: In an effort to urge out-of-town visitors to buckle up their children during the holidays, the Torrance Police Department is offering child car seats for temporary use. Twenty of the seats are available for loan at no charge for up to 30 days. The seats are also available for needy Torrance residents or for families whose babies are born before a car seat has been purchased, said Officer Dale Robbins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1994 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Gerry Lang of Sun Valley approached a police checkpoint on Laurel Canyon Boulevard on Thursday morning, she quickly snapped on her seat belt. Still, when she reached the officer who was peering into cars as they inched their way through, he told her to pull over. "I thought for sure I was getting a ticket," she later said. Instead, she got a new child car seat. And a lecture.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1994 | DENISE GELLENE
What's a parent to do? For years, we've been told that the safest way to fly with small children is to strap them into car seats. Now the results of government crash tests raise serious questions about that advice. The Federal Aviation Administration recently tested various types of safety seats to determine how well they protected children from head injuries in hazardous situations, such as heavy turbulence or a crash landing.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
Remember those wonderful old movies and television shows about American family life? The newborn babe is pink and beautiful and when the time comes to go home from the hospital, daddy helps mommy into the faithful Chevrolet, gently places the blanket-swathed infant in her lap, gets into the car, and they drive off into suburbia. Beautiful, romantic . . .
BUSINESS
January 21, 1994 | DENISE GELLENE
Price gouging is the first of many pitfalls that survivors of Monday's quake may face, law enforcement officials said this week. As the aftershocks subside and water and electricity are restored to homes, prices on water, batteries and other items--inflated to two to three times their usual levels in some areas--should fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1993 | DEBRA CANO
Stephanie Solis pulled up to the city's seat belt checkpoint with her 3 1/2-year-old daughter properly strapped into a child safety seat, earning, as a reward, one of the stuffed bears that Officer Chris Andrews was handing out. Solis' daughter, Katherine, eagerly clutched the toy. Solis, 36, of Fountain Valley, didn't mind that police last week stopped her at the checkpoint on Slater Avenue in front of the Police Department.
NEWS
August 22, 1986 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
The word from Washington hit the streets here with all the enthusiasm traditionally reserved for a flat tire in rush-hour traffic. After years of impassioned warnings to "Buckle up!"--and now a state law that requires it--the National Transportation Safety Board last week issued a report saying that rear seat belts of the lap variety might be hazardous to your health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Street Smart: The interchange where the Ventura and San Diego freeways meet is a circus at the best of times, even after the recent "improvements." However, there is one spot that is bound to lead, sooner or later, to an accident of cataclysmic proportions. Cars traveling east on the Ventura Freeway come out of a sharp curve as they cross the San Diego Freeway. Then they are suddenly confronted on their left by slower traffic in a feeder lane from the southbound San Diego Freeway.
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