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Stephen Ambrose

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
I worried, almost from the beginning of my research into the presidency of Dwight Eisenhower, that something did not quite add up with Stephen Ambrose's famous biography of the former president. I say almost from the beginning because I had no inkling at the very first. I read "Supreme Commander: The War Years of Dwight D. Eisenhower" and "Eisenhower: The President," Ambrose's two-volume biography of Ike — and its one-volume condensation, "Eisenhower: Soldier and President" — with admiration and some intimidation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
I worried, almost from the beginning of my research into the presidency of Dwight Eisenhower, that something did not quite add up with Stephen Ambrose's famous biography of the former president. I say almost from the beginning because I had no inkling at the very first. I read "Supreme Commander: The War Years of Dwight D. Eisenhower" and "Eisenhower: The President," Ambrose's two-volume biography of Ike — and its one-volume condensation, "Eisenhower: Soldier and President" — with admiration and some intimidation.
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BOOKS
June 5, 1994 | Martin Walker, Martin Walker is the U.S. bureau chief of Britain's The Guardian, and author of "The Cold War; A History," published this month by Henry Holt
A magnificent and awesome military operation, and a moment of acute symbolism as the liberation of Europe began, D-day itself was not a great battle by the bloody standards of modern war. At Omaha Beach, the scene of the worst confusion if not the hardest fighting of invasion day, the Americans had 2,220 casualties, mainly from the Rangers and the 1st Division. At Utah Beach, where the terrain was less hostile and the defenders more demoralized, the American 4th Division suffered 187 casualties.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2003 | From a Times staff writer
Historian Stephen E. Ambrose died last October but left behind a novel that Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers plans to publish in September. "This Vast Land: A Young Man's Journal of the Lewis and Clark Expedition" is described as a fictional diary of George Shannon, the 19-year-old who was the youngest member of the famous Lewis and Clark party that explored the Pacific Northwest.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | Associated Press
Historian Stephen Ambrose said Thursday night that he made mistakes in not using quotation marks around sentences that came from other books but said his footnotes adequately attribute the sentences. At least six books by Ambrose have been questioned for errors or alleged plagiarism. The author made the comments before a speech Thursday night in Powell Symphony Hall before a capacity crowd of 2,100. The speech was sponsored by Maryville University.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2003 | From a Times staff writer
Historian Stephen E. Ambrose died last October but left behind a novel that Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers plans to publish in September. "This Vast Land: A Young Man's Journal of the Lewis and Clark Expedition" is described as a fictional diary of George Shannon, the 19-year-old who was the youngest member of the famous Lewis and Clark party that explored the Pacific Northwest.
OPINION
January 17, 2002
Stuart Green's defense of historian Stephen Ambrose's plagiarism makes the point that plagiarism is not synonymous with inaccuracy (Commentary, Jan. 13). He states that fellow historians have a right to censure Ambrose but dismisses that right with the statement that no one claims his books are inaccurate. This is a blase dismissal of a serious issue. Not every book is examined for errors. Errors may not be detected for years, and when detected the misinformation may be so popular that attempts to correct the information are ignored.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | From ASSOCIATED PRESS
Just days after admitting his latest bestseller includes passages copied from another historian's work, author Stephen Ambrose is being cited again for a similar trespass in an earlier work. Forbes .com is reporting that Ambrose's "Crazy Horse and Custer" contains sections similar to Jay Monaghan's "Custer." A spokesperson for Ambrose on Tuesday declined to comment. Anchor Books, which publishes the paperback edition of "Crazy Horse and Custer," also had no comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN
These days, much of the American press is more often than necessary a school for scandal. Hence, the begrudging quality of so many of the obituaries for historian Stephen Ambrose, who died this week at 66.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | MARY LOU FULTON, Times Staff Writer
In celebration of Whittier's 100th birthday this year, there were centennial balloon releases and centennial luncheons, centennial handbell concerts and centennial chili cook-offs. But it occurred to Mayor Pro Tem Sabina Schwab that in this city named for poet and author John Greenleaf Whittier, one group had been excluded. "We've just recognized so many people in other fields of endeavor--artists, musicians--but never the authors," Schwab said. "Whittier himself has never been honored here.
OPINION
October 19, 2002
Hearing of the passing of Stephen E. Ambrose kind of took the wind from my sails (obituary, Oct. 14). Growing up in a post-John Wayne America, many of us lost track of who the real heroes of World War II were. Ambrose changed that. When I saw "Band of Brothers" I was riveted in anticipation of each episode. Seeing the stories of ordinary American men such as C. Carwood Lipton -- a man then younger than myself who survived D-Day, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and right up through the end of the war -- gave me a better understanding of human nature and what real heroism is. Growing up with movies such as "Patton" that focused on a single larger-than-life figure, I never thought about the average soldier.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN
These days, much of the American press is more often than necessary a school for scandal. Hence, the begrudging quality of so many of the obituaries for historian Stephen Ambrose, who died this week at 66.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Stephen E. Ambrose, the populist historian whose best-selling books made hometown heroes anew of America's aging World War II veterans and provided modern insight into such leaders as Dwight D. Eisenhower and Lewis and Clark, died Sunday. He was 66. Ambrose, a longtime smoker, died of lung cancer in a Bay St. Louis, Miss., hospital near New Orleans. His family was with him. "Steve ...
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | Associated Press
Historian Stephen Ambrose said Thursday night that he made mistakes in not using quotation marks around sentences that came from other books but said his footnotes adequately attribute the sentences. At least six books by Ambrose have been questioned for errors or alleged plagiarism. The author made the comments before a speech Thursday night in Powell Symphony Hall before a capacity crowd of 2,100. The speech was sponsored by Maryville University.
OPINION
January 17, 2002
Stuart Green's defense of historian Stephen Ambrose's plagiarism makes the point that plagiarism is not synonymous with inaccuracy (Commentary, Jan. 13). He states that fellow historians have a right to censure Ambrose but dismisses that right with the statement that no one claims his books are inaccurate. This is a blase dismissal of a serious issue. Not every book is examined for errors. Errors may not be detected for years, and when detected the misinformation may be so popular that attempts to correct the information are ignored.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | From ASSOCIATED PRESS
Just days after admitting his latest bestseller includes passages copied from another historian's work, author Stephen Ambrose is being cited again for a similar trespass in an earlier work. Forbes .com is reporting that Ambrose's "Crazy Horse and Custer" contains sections similar to Jay Monaghan's "Custer." A spokesperson for Ambrose on Tuesday declined to comment. Anchor Books, which publishes the paperback edition of "Crazy Horse and Custer," also had no comment.
OPINION
October 19, 2002
Hearing of the passing of Stephen E. Ambrose kind of took the wind from my sails (obituary, Oct. 14). Growing up in a post-John Wayne America, many of us lost track of who the real heroes of World War II were. Ambrose changed that. When I saw "Band of Brothers" I was riveted in anticipation of each episode. Seeing the stories of ordinary American men such as C. Carwood Lipton -- a man then younger than myself who survived D-Day, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and right up through the end of the war -- gave me a better understanding of human nature and what real heroism is. Growing up with movies such as "Patton" that focused on a single larger-than-life figure, I never thought about the average soldier.
BOOKS
November 24, 1991 | Kevin P. Phillips, Phillips, who worked for Richard Nixon in the 1968 GOP campaign, is the editor-publisher of the American Political Report
In both tenacity and perspicacity, Richard Nixon's political re-emergence over the last 14 years has proven as extraordinary as his earlier success at hauling himself back from defeat in the 1962 California gubernatorial race and going on to win the presidency (on his second try) in 1968. Historians and journalists are only just beginning to deal with the forces and circumstances involved. In "Why Americans Hate Politics," political writer E. J.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | KEN RINGLE, THE WASHINGTON POST
Stephen Ambrose looks grumpy. He wears the wary, uncomfortable look of a dyspeptic grizzly leaned out by a long winter, hungry for meat and sunlight. It's not clear just what he's got to be annoyed about. He recently has had two books on the bestseller list at once, which happens to Stephen King and Danielle Steel but not often to historians. "Citizen Soldiers," the GI's view of World War II in Europe from D-Day to the surrender of Germany, is his 19th book.
NEWS
December 5, 1997 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The historian Stephen E. Ambrose wears his uncomplicated heart on his sleeve. "In four decades of teaching," he has written, "I've always found that what the students want, first of all, is: Who were our heroes? What did they do? . . . So my approach to war and politics has been biographical." So it is with "Citizen Soldiers," a lively account of the Allied liberation of Northern Europe. Ambrose has previously written books about big men in American history: Gen. (and President) Dwight D.
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