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Stephen Breuning

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September 20, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
In what prosecutors say is the first criminal conviction of a federally funded researcher on charges of scientific fraud, a prominent researcher in the field of mental retardation pleaded guilty Monday in Baltimore to falsifying scientific data. Stephen Breuning, a 36-year-old psychologist and expert in drug treatment for hyperactive mentally retarded children, pleaded guilty in federal court in Baltimore to charges of making false statements to a federal agency funding his research.
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NEWS
September 20, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
In what prosecutors say is the first criminal conviction of a federally funded researcher on charges of scientific fraud, a prominent researcher in the field of mental retardation pleaded guilty Monday in Baltimore to falsifying scientific data. Stephen Breuning, a 36-year-old psychologist and expert in drug treatment for hyperactive mentally retarded children, pleaded guilty in federal court in Baltimore to charges of making false statements to a federal agency funding his research.
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NEWS
April 17, 1988
As prosecutors speculated the problem "is more widespread than we think," a drug therapy researcher was indicted on charges of falsifying medical research, the first such indictments in a federal court. Dr. Stephen H. Breuning, 35, director of psychological services at the Polk Center in Polk, Pa., was charged with submitting phony research studies when he applied in 1983 for two grants. His attorney denied the charges.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | United Press International
A psychologist considered a leading expert on drug therapies for hyperactive children was sentenced Thursday to 60 days in prison in the nation's first federal conviction for falsifying scientific data. Dr. Stephen Breuning pleaded guilty in September to two counts of falsifying data on drug therapies, including the use of Ritalin and Dexedrine, in order to obtain more than $160,000 in federal research grants. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1988 | DANIEL S. GREENBERG, Daniel S. Greenberg is the editor and publisher of Science & Government Report, a Washington newsletter. and
A long and distinguished medical career was publicly blighted last month after one of Harvard's most honored professors, Dr. Shervert Frazier, was accused of including plagiarized material in four articles published more than a decade ago. Confronted, Frazier resigned from a professorship in psychiatry at Harvard medical school and as head of a Harvard-affiliated teaching hospital.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | JENNIFER TOTH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is fraud becoming more common in American science? That question has surfaced anew since a spate of incidents involving allegations of misconduct in the reporting of scientific research. In one of the best known of these incidents, an assistant to David Baltimore, president of Rockefeller University in New York, charged that Baltimore used falsified and manufactured data supplied by a colleague in an influential paper, then refused to investigate warnings that the material was flawed.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, biologist Jonathan Singer had an experience that every honest scientist dreads. A colleague had falsified research data, and the information ended up in one of Singer's published papers. Such first-hand knowledge of scientific misconduct, by most accounts, is not unheard of. And neither was Singer's response. He did nothing. Today, the veteran UC San Diego researcher still believes he did the right and "humane" thing. "It was minor," Singer said of his colleague's transgression.
NEWS
April 29, 1987 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
Reports of irregularities in biomedical research--ranging from outright fakery and plagiarism to poor record-keeping--have increased markedly in recent years, shaking leading research institutions and triggering a sharp debate on the extent of the problem and the need for corrective measures.
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