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Stephen C Neal

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BUSINESS
December 21, 1991 | Associated Press
Judy J. Wischer, indicted with Charles Keating Jr. on federal racketeering and fraud charges in the Lincoln Savings & Loan debacle, was released on $300,000 bail after a week in jail, her lawyer said Friday. Keating and his son remained behind bars, struggling to post a combined $450,000 bond. They asked for a second bail reduction hearing, which was scheduled for Monday morning, Assistant U.S. Atty. David Sklansky said. Attorney Donald C.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second time, a federal judge threw out Charles H. Keating Jr.'s state securities fraud conviction, ruling Thursday that the trial of the former Lincoln Savings & Loan operator was constitutionally flawed. The ruling means Keating is once again clear of all convictions, pending an expected appeal. U.S. District Judge John G. Davies in Los Angeles granted a new petition by the onetime Arizona developer to dismiss the 17-count state verdict.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors say Charles H. Keating Jr.'s attorney should be disqualified from defending him on bank fraud and racketeering charges because the defense lawyer has previously represented two of Keating's co-defendants in civil matters. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer will hear arguments Monday on whether the potential conflict is serious enough to bar Stephen C. Neal from representing Keating in the criminal trial.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Monday refused to disqualify Charles H. Keating Jr.'s lawyer from defending the former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner on criminal charges of bank fraud and racketeering. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer indicated that Stephen C. Neal would be able to continue representing Keating even though he previously had represented two co-defendants in civil matters. The two co-defendants--Keating's son, Charles H. Keating III, and one of Keating's sons-in-law, Robert M.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Monday refused to disqualify Charles H. Keating Jr.'s lawyer from defending the former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner on criminal charges of bank fraud and racketeering. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer indicated that Stephen C. Neal would be able to continue representing Keating even though he previously had represented two co-defendants in civil matters. The two co-defendants--Keating's son, Charles H. Keating III, and one of Keating's sons-in-law, Robert M.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a second time in a month, the criminal securities fraud trial of Charles H. Keating Jr. was disrupted Tuesday by a bondholder who accosted the former owner of Lincoln Savings & Loan during a break in proceedings. As Keating was returning to the courtroom, Skip E. Lowe, 62, a West Hollywood comedian, pulled a powdered blonde wig from an MGM movie travel bag and hit Keating twice near his right shoulder. "This is for America," Lowe said as he took a swipe.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
The final prosecution witness against Charles H. Keating Jr. was a replay of the first: an elderly Lincoln Savings customer who related meekly Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court how a "safe" investment turned out to be a worthless junk bond. In a voice that quavered at times, Bertha Rettig told jurors that she and her husband, Warren, went to the Woodland Hills Lincoln branch to "roll over" a $30,000 certificate of deposit.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second time, a federal judge threw out Charles H. Keating Jr.'s state securities fraud conviction, ruling Thursday that the trial of the former Lincoln Savings & Loan operator was constitutionally flawed. The ruling means Keating is once again clear of all convictions, pending an expected appeal. U.S. District Judge John G. Davies in Los Angeles granted a new petition by the onetime Arizona developer to dismiss the 17-count state verdict.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Lincoln Savings & Loan boss Charles H. Keating Jr. won a final victory Monday before the U.S. Supreme Court, defeating attempts to reinstate his 1991 state court conviction on charges of swindling elderly investors. Without comment, the high court refused to reopen the case, leaving intact lower court rulings that Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance Ito had allowed a flawed prosecution.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors say Charles H. Keating Jr.'s attorney should be disqualified from defending him on bank fraud and racketeering charges because the defense lawyer has previously represented two of Keating's co-defendants in civil matters. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer will hear arguments Monday on whether the potential conflict is serious enough to bar Stephen C. Neal from representing Keating in the criminal trial.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1991 | Associated Press
Judy J. Wischer, indicted with Charles Keating Jr. on federal racketeering and fraud charges in the Lincoln Savings & Loan debacle, was released on $300,000 bail after a week in jail, her lawyer said Friday. Keating and his son remained behind bars, struggling to post a combined $450,000 bond. They asked for a second bail reduction hearing, which was scheduled for Monday morning, Assistant U.S. Atty. David Sklansky said. Attorney Donald C.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
The final prosecution witness against Charles H. Keating Jr. was a replay of the first: an elderly Lincoln Savings customer who related meekly Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court how a "safe" investment turned out to be a worthless junk bond. In a voice that quavered at times, Bertha Rettig told jurors that she and her husband, Warren, went to the Woodland Hills Lincoln branch to "roll over" a $30,000 certificate of deposit.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a second time in a month, the criminal securities fraud trial of Charles H. Keating Jr. was disrupted Tuesday by a bondholder who accosted the former owner of Lincoln Savings & Loan during a break in proceedings. As Keating was returning to the courtroom, Skip E. Lowe, 62, a West Hollywood comedian, pulled a powdered blonde wig from an MGM movie travel bag and hit Keating twice near his right shoulder. "This is for America," Lowe said as he took a swipe.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1992
Keating Motivated by Greed, Prosecution Says: Former Lincoln Savings owner Charles Keating Jr. lied to his accountants, cheated investors and bribed associates to cover tup the financial troubles facing his corporate empire, a prosecutor said Friday. Assistant U.S. Attorney David Sklansky told jurors in closing arguments at Keating's federal racketeering trial that the Arizona businessman's motivation for the deception was simple greed. "Greed. Greed on an absolutely staggering scale," he said.
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