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Stephen Chow

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2003 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
In Hong Kong, he's the King of Comedy, but Stephen Chow is quick to point out, "I'm not a funny man at all," adding in halting English, "I'm actually a very quiet person." This is Asia's Jim Carrey? Where are the antics, the slapstick comic style that's made him a superstar overseas (even if American audiences have barely heard of him)? Reed thin in a jogging outfit, his lank black hair flopping over his forehead, Chow seems too slight, too soft-spoken to be a movie star.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hong Kong comedian Stephen Chow said he will no longer direct the Hollywood adaptation of "The Green Hornet" and may not star as sidekick Kato. Chow, whose credits include "Shaolin Soccer" and "Kung Fu Hustle," said he wants to free up time to work with Jack Black on a comedy about a superhero. "If I direct 'The Green Hornet,' the superhero comedy will have to be delayed for two years," Chow said. "The timing might not be right for a superhero comedy in two years. And I want to make a movie based on an original idea."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In a 1940s Chinese police station, a camera darts and swerves like a trapped, startled bird as a brutal street gang beats a hapless cop senseless, sending him crashing into a sign that reads "Crimebusters." Having sufficiently terrorized the police corps, the gang saunters into the street, whereupon its leader takes one look at the deserted movie theater across the way and sneers, "Sunday afternoon and the place is deserted. Who would go into the movie business?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The audition tour to find just the right youngster to star with Hong Kong actor-director Stephen Chow in his new film, "CJ7," stretched across China and screened 10,000 children. One of the last stops in the search for a boy to play Chow's rambunctious son, Dicky, was in Ningbo, a seaport town in the northeastern Zhejiang province, where the casting agents finally found their man, who, as it happened, was a girl. So what was it about Xu Jiao, now 11, that made Chow believe she could play a boy?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hong Kong comedian Stephen Chow said he will no longer direct the Hollywood adaptation of "The Green Hornet" and may not star as sidekick Kato. Chow, whose credits include "Shaolin Soccer" and "Kung Fu Hustle," said he wants to free up time to work with Jack Black on a comedy about a superhero. "If I direct 'The Green Hornet,' the superhero comedy will have to be delayed for two years," Chow said. "The timing might not be right for a superhero comedy in two years. And I want to make a movie based on an original idea."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
As writer, director and star of the martial arts comedies "Shaolin Soccer" and "Kung Fu Hustle," Hong Kong filmmaker Stephen Chow nimbly blended big kicks and broad yuks. The splendid combination of highbrow and lowbrow was made all the more impressive by Chow's ability to juggle and mix genres with Cirque du Soleil-like dexterity. Unfortunately, his disappointing new film, "CJ7," is as clumsy and awkward as his previous films were stylishly silly. A hodgepodge of "E.T.," "Gremlins" and a host of old Disney comedies, its occasionally endearing schmaltz is eclipsed by bizarre shifts in tone and a lackluster story.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The audition tour to find just the right youngster to star with Hong Kong actor-director Stephen Chow in his new film, "CJ7," stretched across China and screened 10,000 children. One of the last stops in the search for a boy to play Chow's rambunctious son, Dicky, was in Ningbo, a seaport town in the northeastern Zhejiang province, where the casting agents finally found their man, who, as it happened, was a girl. So what was it about Xu Jiao, now 11, that made Chow believe she could play a boy?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2005 | Andrew C.C. Huang, Special to The Times
Hollywood is certainly no stranger to importing cinematic talents from Asia's movie capital, but there is a crucial difference between comic superstar Stephen Chow -- who knocked on U.S. doors this weekend with his pan-Asian blockbuster "Kung Fu Hustle" -- and his high-profile Hong Kong peers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Shaolin Soccer" -- an infectious knockabout kung fu comedy with amusing special effects combined with breathtaking stunts -- stars its director, Stephen Chow, as Sing, a Shaolin monk who finds so little call for his wizardly martial arts skills that he's reduced to working as a Shanghai garbage collector.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008
The Bank Job | Thieves steal millions' worth of jewelry in 1970s London. CJ7 | Stephen Chow wrote, directed and stars in this tale about a father whose son receives an otherworldly toy. College Road Trip | An overprotective father crashes his daughter's (Raven-Symone) tour of schools. Girls Rock! | Girls ages 8 to 18 travel from all over the country to attend rock 'n' roll camp in this documentary. Last Stop for Paul | Two friends travel around the world to scatter the ashes of their deceased pal. Married Life | A man decides he must kill his wife so she doesn't suffer when he leaves her. Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day | In 1939 London, a proper governess gets caught up in the whirlwind of a glamorous American.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
As writer, director and star of the martial arts comedies "Shaolin Soccer" and "Kung Fu Hustle," Hong Kong filmmaker Stephen Chow nimbly blended big kicks and broad yuks. The splendid combination of highbrow and lowbrow was made all the more impressive by Chow's ability to juggle and mix genres with Cirque du Soleil-like dexterity. Unfortunately, his disappointing new film, "CJ7," is as clumsy and awkward as his previous films were stylishly silly. A hodgepodge of "E.T.," "Gremlins" and a host of old Disney comedies, its occasionally endearing schmaltz is eclipsed by bizarre shifts in tone and a lackluster story.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2005 | Andrew C.C. Huang, Special to The Times
Hollywood is certainly no stranger to importing cinematic talents from Asia's movie capital, but there is a crucial difference between comic superstar Stephen Chow -- who knocked on U.S. doors this weekend with his pan-Asian blockbuster "Kung Fu Hustle" -- and his high-profile Hong Kong peers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In a 1940s Chinese police station, a camera darts and swerves like a trapped, startled bird as a brutal street gang beats a hapless cop senseless, sending him crashing into a sign that reads "Crimebusters." Having sufficiently terrorized the police corps, the gang saunters into the street, whereupon its leader takes one look at the deserted movie theater across the way and sneers, "Sunday afternoon and the place is deserted. Who would go into the movie business?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2003 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
In Hong Kong, he's the King of Comedy, but Stephen Chow is quick to point out, "I'm not a funny man at all," adding in halting English, "I'm actually a very quiet person." This is Asia's Jim Carrey? Where are the antics, the slapstick comic style that's made him a superstar overseas (even if American audiences have barely heard of him)? Reed thin in a jogging outfit, his lank black hair flopping over his forehead, Chow seems too slight, too soft-spoken to be a movie star.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2005
Among films opening in just a few theaters, Stephen Chow's "Kung Fu Hustle" (in Mandarin, with subtitles) posted an impressive per venue average of $38,460 in seven locations in New York and L.A. Sony Pictures Classics will expand the action-packed spoof of martial arts-themed films to more than 2,000 theaters nationwide April 22. Source: Exhibitor Relations Inc. *--* Movie 3-Day Total Venues Avg. Weeks (Studio) Gross (Millions) Per (Millions) Venue 1 Sahara (Paramount) $18.1 $18.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A master swordsman leaves his homeland of warring clans for the Wild West in the bloody wuxia/shoot-em-up hybrid "The Warrior's Way. " But South Korean filmmaker Sngmoo Lee's debut feature is less a genre-spanning romp than a tiresome lab experiment in computer-generated tropes and green-screen oppressiveness. The human part involves quietly dashing Korean star Jang Dong-Gun as the stoic, blade-wielding nomad Yang, who brings his waylaid enemies' lone survivor, a baby girl he can't bring himself to kill, to an American frontier outpost made up mostly of circus workers led by a welcoming ringmaster named Eightball (the always appealing Tony Cox)
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