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Stephen Chow

ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A master swordsman leaves his homeland of warring clans for the Wild West in the bloody wuxia/shoot-em-up hybrid "The Warrior's Way. " But South Korean filmmaker Sngmoo Lee's debut feature is less a genre-spanning romp than a tiresome lab experiment in computer-generated tropes and green-screen oppressiveness. The human part involves quietly dashing Korean star Jang Dong-Gun as the stoic, blade-wielding nomad Yang, who brings his waylaid enemies' lone survivor, a baby girl he can't bring himself to kill, to an American frontier outpost made up mostly of circus workers led by a welcoming ringmaster named Eightball (the always appealing Tony Cox)
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BUSINESS
January 1, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - China's movie box office topped $3.6 billion in 2013, up about 27% over 2012, with home-grown fare drawing particularly large crowds and driving down Hollywood's share of the market. Seven of the 10 highest-grossing films were Chinese, data from box office analysis firms Artisan Gateway and EntGroup showed Tuesday. In first place was Stephen Chow's action-comedy "Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons," which took in about $207 million. Three Hollywood films made the top 10. "Iron Man 3," also the top box-office performer in the U.S., made $124 million for second place.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2009 | Robert Abele
Everywhere in these tough times, people are trimming the excess from their lives. The Indian martial arts comedy "Chandni Chowk to China," however, which stars Akshay Kumar as a hapless food-stall worker who goes from chopping vegetables to hand-chopping bad guys, approaches entertainment with a more-is-more ethos.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
This post has been corrected. See below for details. Village Roadshow Entertainment, the production and finance company behind such film franchises as "Sherlock Holmes"and "Happy Feet," has raised $380 million in new capital. The money will allow the production outfit to expand the number of movies it makes with longtime studio partner Warner Bros.as well as grow a new China-based venture. The equity, which comes from investment firm Trinity Opportunities Limited and was arranged with Hong Kong's Shikumen Capital Management, will give Village Roadshow the ability to access more of a $1-billion debt facility that it set up last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
"This film is in great shape," Harvey Weinstein was crowing the other day. "We put $2 million into the movie just in restoration costs alone. We got a composer to do a new score; it has a new stereo soundtrack, with a great new sound mix and sound effects. Everything was first-class. We even did the mix at the Skywalker Ranch." To hear him talk, you'd think the Miramax czar had lovingly restored a lost Sergei Eisenstein classic he'd found buried in Lenin's tomb.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2005 | R. Kinsey Lowe, Times Staff Writer
The absence of any strong new draw for the youth market made plenty of room at the top of the nation's box office for Sydney Pollack's "The Interpreter," and females dominated the audience for the three newest movies, as they have for the past two weekends. The film, which stars Nicole Kidman as an interpreter who overhears a conversation about an assassination plot at the U.N. and Sean Penn as the Secret Service agent assigned to investigate and protect her, took in an estimated $22.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2005 | R. Kinsey Lowe, Times Staff Writer
There appears to be money in ghosts, or at least in movies about ghosts -- even in tales told twice, thrice or more. MGM's "The Amityville Horror" scared up an estimated $23.3 million over the weekend to take the lead in box office receipts, the studio reported Sunday.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2013 | By Daniel Miller, Los Angeles Times
Village Roadshow Pictures Asia released its first Chinese-language film with no certainty the modestly budgeted movie would succeed with audiences in the world's most populous country. But "Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons," a comedic take on a well-known 16th century Chinese fantasy novel, had a February opening-week gross of $93.5 million - the biggest ever in China. It already has made $200.5 million, and it could go on to gross more at China's box office than any other Chinese-made film in history.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
"The Green Hornet" needed a superhero to save it. Sony Pictures has long been counting on the big budget action-comedy to be a new franchise that could stand alongside hit movie series like "Spider-Man. " Coming off a disastrous holiday season, capped by James L. Brooks' flop "How Do You Know," the studio could ill afford to have "The Green Hornet" play to empty theaters after it invested more than $200 million to make and market the film around the world. But last summer, early cuts of "The Green Hornet" and scoffs from fanboys at the Comic-Con comic book convention in San Diego had Sony executives worried that they had a flop on their hands, people close to the picture said.
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