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Stephen Cohen

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1995 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
'Welcome to my new space," says photography dealer Stephen Cohen as a middle-aged man steps into a sparkling clean, light-filled gallery on Beverly Boulevard. "You've grown," the visitor says. Cohen hands him the list of works in the inaugural show: Depression-era images by the late Arthur Rothstein. The scene here has calmed since an opening reception on April 21 packed in several hundred people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011
MUSIC The Decemberists On "The Hazards of Love" (2009), frontman Colin Meloy and his merry band of Pacific Northwest hucksters created a medieval rock opera. The band's latest album, "The King Is Dead," takes the opposite tack, exploring Americana, a much more simple, rustic format. The right players are on the record with Meloy — R.E.M.'s Peter Buck contributes guitar and mandolin, and Gillian Welch provides vocals that go a long way in establishing some measure of restraint here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2011
ART Collectors' Favorites, a special exhibition of photographs on loan from private collections of members of LACMA's Photographic Arts Council, features 60 artworks from the 1880s to the present day. The show features masters of photography such as Karl Struss, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Ruth Bernard, Bruce Davidson, James Van Der Zee, W. Eugene Smith, and Heinrich Kühn. Stephen Cohen Gallery, 7358 Beverly Blvd., Park La Brea. Exhibit opening reception, 7-9 p.m. Thu. Runs Tue.-Sat.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2011
ART Collectors' Favorites, a special exhibition of photographs on loan from private collections of members of LACMA's Photographic Arts Council, features 60 artworks from the 1880s to the present day. The show features masters of photography such as Karl Struss, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Ruth Bernard, Bruce Davidson, James Van Der Zee, W. Eugene Smith, and Heinrich Kühn. Stephen Cohen Gallery, 7358 Beverly Blvd., Park La Brea. Exhibit opening reception, 7-9 p.m. Thu. Runs Tue.-Sat.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Michael Cohen is one of the most successful entrepreneurs of the Internet Age, having raked in an estimated $43 million in profit from advertising fees and monthly memberships sold through the pornography site http://www.sex.com. What makes the feat more impressive is that Cohen, a multiple felon who once advertised swingers' sex parties in Orange County, made his money by swiping the Sex.com site with a forged letter to the agency that registers Internet names. Within days, U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011
MUSIC The Decemberists On "The Hazards of Love" (2009), frontman Colin Meloy and his merry band of Pacific Northwest hucksters created a medieval rock opera. The band's latest album, "The King Is Dead," takes the opposite tack, exploring Americana, a much more simple, rustic format. The right players are on the record with Meloy — R.E.M.'s Peter Buck contributes guitar and mandolin, and Gillian Welch provides vocals that go a long way in establishing some measure of restraint here.
BOOKS
March 21, 1993 | Reviewed by Geoffrey Hosking, Hosking is professor of Russian history, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London
In the 1960s, Yegor Ligachev once visited a shipyard undergoing a complete overhaul. "A large, tall new building was erected over the old building without touching it," he recalls. "Only after completion of the new roof was the old structure inside taken down." Looking back in his memoirs on this experience, he cites it as an object lesson for the political reconstruction, perestroika , which the Soviet leaders undertook in the '80s. If politics were that simple, Ligachev would be the ideal politician.
BOOKS
July 26, 1987 | James Risen, Risen is the Detroit bureau chief for The Times. He writes frequently about American manufacturing
In economics, an "inexact science" in which theory can never be proven in a laboratory, conventional wisdom, professional consensus--and perhaps even peer pressure among specialists--often seem to crowd out really controversial debates about fundamental issues. It's almost as if most economists don't want to challenge the basic tenets of their profession for fear of letting the rest of the world see that economics is frequently more inexact than it is a science.
BOOKS
June 25, 1989 | Paul Dean, Dean is a pilot and a Times staff writer.
The obvious strength of the techno-thriller--from Tom Clancy's firm grip on submarine warfare to Dale Brown's absolute command of SDI countermeasures--is the authenticity of its techno to the nth microchip. Thriller usually comes easy. In "Night Launch," a story of glasnost gone awry in space, there is no doubting the depth, easy proportions and presentation of the technical. It comes straight from the astronaut's mouth. In 1985, co-author and ex-Navy fighter pilot Garn (R-Utah)
BOOKS
January 19, 1986 | Jack Burby, Burby is assistant editor of The Times' editorial pages
There are two ways to look back at the Geneva summit. One is to assume that someone, somewhere, knows what really happened during the two days of meetings between President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev and what it all meant. Another is to read the largest of these two volumes and realize that, if history is any guide, there is a good chance that nobody really knows. That is just one contribution that Raymond L.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Three Southern California art fairs in January, two of them in one weekend? In this economy? It may defy logic, but business is business. As conceived when the financial outlook was rosier, photo.l.a., an annual marketplace for a kaleidoscopic range of photography, is winding up today at Santa Monica Airport's Barker Hangar. Art LA, a showcase and sales venue for edgy new work, is gearing up for its Jan. 23 to 25 gig, also at Barker Hangar.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Michael Cohen is one of the most successful entrepreneurs of the Internet Age, having raked in an estimated $43 million in profit from advertising fees and monthly memberships sold through the pornography site http://www.sex.com. What makes the feat more impressive is that Cohen, a multiple felon who once advertised swingers' sex parties in Orange County, made his money by swiping the Sex.com site with a forged letter to the agency that registers Internet names. Within days, U.S.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Failed Crusade" is a jeremiad of a book, a bitter lament about America's treatment of Russia in the years of Boris Yeltsin and a prophecy of doom unless U.S. policy is changed. Stephen F. Cohen writes that the United States, by backing Yeltsin wholeheartedly, brutally forced Russia toward an American-style capitalism for which it was neither suited nor ready.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1995 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
'Welcome to my new space," says photography dealer Stephen Cohen as a middle-aged man steps into a sparkling clean, light-filled gallery on Beverly Boulevard. "You've grown," the visitor says. Cohen hands him the list of works in the inaugural show: Depression-era images by the late Arthur Rothstein. The scene here has calmed since an opening reception on April 21 packed in several hundred people.
BOOKS
March 21, 1993 | Reviewed by Geoffrey Hosking, Hosking is professor of Russian history, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London
In the 1960s, Yegor Ligachev once visited a shipyard undergoing a complete overhaul. "A large, tall new building was erected over the old building without touching it," he recalls. "Only after completion of the new roof was the old structure inside taken down." Looking back in his memoirs on this experience, he cites it as an object lesson for the political reconstruction, perestroika , which the Soviet leaders undertook in the '80s. If politics were that simple, Ligachev would be the ideal politician.
BOOKS
June 25, 1989 | Paul Dean, Dean is a pilot and a Times staff writer.
The obvious strength of the techno-thriller--from Tom Clancy's firm grip on submarine warfare to Dale Brown's absolute command of SDI countermeasures--is the authenticity of its techno to the nth microchip. Thriller usually comes easy. In "Night Launch," a story of glasnost gone awry in space, there is no doubting the depth, easy proportions and presentation of the technical. It comes straight from the astronaut's mouth. In 1985, co-author and ex-Navy fighter pilot Garn (R-Utah)
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Failed Crusade" is a jeremiad of a book, a bitter lament about America's treatment of Russia in the years of Boris Yeltsin and a prophecy of doom unless U.S. policy is changed. Stephen F. Cohen writes that the United States, by backing Yeltsin wholeheartedly, brutally forced Russia toward an American-style capitalism for which it was neither suited nor ready.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Three Southern California art fairs in January, two of them in one weekend? In this economy? It may defy logic, but business is business. As conceived when the financial outlook was rosier, photo.l.a., an annual marketplace for a kaleidoscopic range of photography, is winding up today at Santa Monica Airport's Barker Hangar. Art LA, a showcase and sales venue for edgy new work, is gearing up for its Jan. 23 to 25 gig, also at Barker Hangar.
BOOKS
July 26, 1987 | James Risen, Risen is the Detroit bureau chief for The Times. He writes frequently about American manufacturing
In economics, an "inexact science" in which theory can never be proven in a laboratory, conventional wisdom, professional consensus--and perhaps even peer pressure among specialists--often seem to crowd out really controversial debates about fundamental issues. It's almost as if most economists don't want to challenge the basic tenets of their profession for fear of letting the rest of the world see that economics is frequently more inexact than it is a science.
BOOKS
January 19, 1986 | Jack Burby, Burby is assistant editor of The Times' editorial pages
There are two ways to look back at the Geneva summit. One is to assume that someone, somewhere, knows what really happened during the two days of meetings between President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev and what it all meant. Another is to read the largest of these two volumes and realize that, if history is any guide, there is a good chance that nobody really knows. That is just one contribution that Raymond L.
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