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Stephen Cornwell

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1995 | NANCY MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Growing up during the Cold War as the son of spy-obsessed novelist John Le Carre had its chancy moments, Stephen Cornwell recalls. "We were very worried about 'bugs' in the house. We were told that people could listen in every room, so don't talk about what Dad did. So the notion of 'bugs' getting in was very vivid. "On my fourth birthday I got a stuffed ladybug on wheels. That night someone put it in my room, and the next morning, when I woke up, I started screaming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1995 | NANCY MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Growing up during the Cold War as the son of spy-obsessed novelist John Le Carre had its chancy moments, Stephen Cornwell recalls. "We were very worried about 'bugs' in the house. We were told that people could listen in every room, so don't talk about what Dad did. So the notion of 'bugs' getting in was very vivid. "On my fourth birthday I got a stuffed ladybug on wheels. That night someone put it in my room, and the next morning, when I woke up, I started screaming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1990 | David Pecchia \f7
Barton Fink (Barton Circle Prods.). Shooting in L.A. Joel and Ethan Coen's next film has John Turturro as the title character, who is known primarily as a NYC playwright but is lured out to Hollywood to conjure up a screenplay. Fink struggles to overcome a migraine case of writer's block to make his deadline. Executive producer Ben Barenholtz. Producer E. Coen. Director J. Coen. Screenwriters J. and E. Coen. Also stars John Goodman, Judy Davis, John Mahoney, Michael Lerner and Jon Polito.
NEWS
August 24, 1996 | From Associated Press
Tulare County Superior Court Judge Howard Broadman has been publicly censured by the state Commission on Judicial Performance for prejudicial administration of justice. The counts involved talking to reporters about pending cases, researching whether prison treatment could be withheld from an HIV-positive defendant and meeting in chambers with a lawyer who was prosecuting a case against a lawyer who was involved in a dispute with Broadman.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Movie Critic
"Unknown" is a nifty international thriller of the "what if?" variety. What if you came out of a coma after a car accident to find that no one knew you? Or, even worse, that someone had pilfered your identity, and everyone you thought you knew, especially your wife, insisted that that other person was you. Now an ordinary individual might have trouble in that situation, but "Unknown" doesn't have anyone average as the beleaguered biologist Martin Harris ? it has Liam Neeson, the star of "Taken" and one of the most naturally forceful actors on the contemporary scene.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Thanksgiving weekend in 1991 a dust storm blew through fallow cotton fields west of here and engulfed Interstate 5, triggering a midday pileup that killed 17 people and injured 151, a scene of charred bodies and scorched metal that rescue workers compared to war. Today, the massive legal case generated by the worst highway accident in U.S. history is wending its way through Fresno County Superior Court, a procession of 99 plaintiffs, 174 defendants, 104 attorneys and 46,822 documents.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1993
We already know that Columbia Pictures has Martin Scorsese's "The Age of Innocence" all lined up for Oscar consideration. Other year-enders that look like they have Oscar intentions include Oliver Stone's "Heaven and Earth," Peter Weir's "Fearless," and James L. Brooks' "I'll Do Anything," David Cronenberg's "M. Butterfly," Merchant Ivory's "The Remains of the Day" and maybe Bill Forsythe's "Being Human," if only for the ambitious part of Robin Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1991 | Information for this issue was compiled by David Pecchia and Kirk Honeycutt.
SPRING Spring, like puberty, is an awkward time. The studios don't want to open a potentially big movie in April or May for fear of squandering the millions they might make by waiting until school is out. On the other hand, there is the chance that a big-audience movie will catch on in spring and thunder right on into summer--last year, such lightning struck both "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" and "The Hunt for Red October." "Turtle" fans will not be disappointed. As soon as the producers recovered from the shock of having one of the year's biggest blockbusters on their hands, they rushed a sequel into production, and it will show up almost a year to the day after the original.
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