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Stephen D Hassenfeld

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NEWS
June 27, 1989
Stephen D. Hassenfeld, 47, chairman and chief executive officer of Hasbro Inc., the giant toy manufacturer. He is credited with the Pawtucket, R.I.-based company's explosive growth in the 1980s. One of his last acts was to engineer the buyout of the financially troubled Coleco Industries of Avon, Conn. The $90-million deal was completed two weeks ago while Hassenfeld was in the hospital. Hassenfeld also directed the company's acquisition of Milton Bradley Co. in 1984. Since 1980, when Hassenfeld became chairman, the company has grown from net revenues of $102.
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BUSINESS
July 7, 1989
Alan G. Hassenfeld, president of Hasbro Inc., has been named to succeed his late brother as chairman and chief executive of the Pawtucket, R.I., toy manufacturer. Hassenfeld, 40, had been second in command at Hasbro since 1984, and his elevation to the chairmanship was widely expected. He will remain president, the company said. In a brief statement after his election, Hassenfeld promised to continue the course set by his brother, Stephen, who died on June 25 at age 47.
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NEWS
June 26, 1989 | From Times wire services
Stephen D. Hassenfeld, chairman of Hasbro Inc., the nation's largest toy company, died Sunday night at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center after a monthlong battle with pneumonia. Hassenfeld, 47, had been in the hospital's intensive care unit since he was admitted four weeks ago. The Providence native is credited with the Pawtucket, R.I.-based company's explosive growth in the 1980s. Hassenfeld directed the company's acquisition of Milton Bradley Co. in 1984.
NEWS
June 27, 1989
Stephen D. Hassenfeld, 47, chairman and chief executive officer of Hasbro Inc., the giant toy manufacturer. He is credited with the Pawtucket, R.I.-based company's explosive growth in the 1980s. One of his last acts was to engineer the buyout of the financially troubled Coleco Industries of Avon, Conn. The $90-million deal was completed two weeks ago while Hassenfeld was in the hospital. Hassenfeld also directed the company's acquisition of Milton Bradley Co. in 1984. Since 1980, when Hassenfeld became chairman, the company has grown from net revenues of $102.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1989
Alan G. Hassenfeld, president of Hasbro Inc., has been named to succeed his late brother as chairman and chief executive of the Pawtucket, R.I., toy manufacturer. Hassenfeld, 40, had been second in command at Hasbro since 1984, and his elevation to the chairmanship was widely expected. He will remain president, the company said. In a brief statement after his election, Hassenfeld promised to continue the course set by his brother, Stephen, who died on June 25 at age 47.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1989
Hasbro Adopts Anti-Takeover Measures: Toy manufacturer Hasbro Inc. said it has adopted measures to stave off potentially hostile takeover bids after rumors the company might become a target. The measures do not prohibit sale of the company, but effectively give shareholders the right to buy Hasbro stock at a discount in the event of a hostile takeover bid. The move follows the hospitalization of Hasbro Chairman Stephen D. Hassenfeld, 47, for treatment of pneumonia, which has stirred rumors the company might be sold if he does not return to work.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
The death over the weekend of Stephen D. Hassenfeld, chairman and chief executive of Hasbro Inc., raised questions Monday on Wall Street about the giant toy company's future. Hassenfeld, 47, died of pneumonia and cardiac arrest Sunday night at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, where he had been hospitalized for four weeks, Hasbro spokesman Wayne Charness said. "I believe that within the next year, you will see the company sold. It's an attractive property in the industry," said Paul Valentine, an industry analyst at Standard & Poor's Corp.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Stock prices closed sharply lower Monday as traders cashed in some of the gains that carried the market to new post-crash highs last week. The Dow Jones index of 30 industrials, up 49.70 points on Friday, dropped back 20.49 to 2,511.38. Declining issues outnumbered advances by about 4 to 3 in nationwide trading of New York Stock Exchange-listed stocks. Volume on the floor of the Big Board declined to 143.60 million shares from Friday's 198.72 million. The market's climb last week to new peaks since the debacle in the fall of 1987 was spurred by accumulating evidence of a slowing economy.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Toy soldiers are made to be shot at, and that's just what Mattel Inc. did to its Men of Medal army. As the Hawthorne-based toy company readied to ship thousands of soldiers to eager customers last winter, a last-minute market survey predicted that the toy wouldn't sell. Fearing disaster, Mattel sold only those on hand and stopped making the toy. "We caught it in time," says Mattel President Robert Sansone, who shot down the toy army. If Mattel's action seems unduly cautious, it has good reason.
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | From Times wire services
Stephen D. Hassenfeld, chairman of Hasbro Inc., the nation's largest toy company, died Sunday night at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center after a monthlong battle with pneumonia. Hassenfeld, 47, had been in the hospital's intensive care unit since he was admitted four weeks ago. The Providence native is credited with the Pawtucket, R.I.-based company's explosive growth in the 1980s. Hassenfeld directed the company's acquisition of Milton Bradley Co. in 1984.
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