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Stephen D Yslas

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners announced his resignation on Tuesday, marking the second time in less than three weeks that one of the panel's five members has stepped down. Robert M. Talcott, a police commission member since 1984 and president the last five years, is leaving the board Dec. 1 to join a committee of civic leaders to help bring the World Cup soccer tournament finals to Los Angeles in 1994, the mayor's office announced.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners announced his resignation on Tuesday, marking the second time in less than three weeks that one of the panel's five members has stepped down. Robert M. Talcott, a police commission member since 1984 and president the last five years, is leaving the board Dec. 1 to join a committee of civic leaders to help bring the World Cup soccer tournament finals to Los Angeles in 1994, the mayor's office announced.
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NEWS
August 15, 1985
Los Angeles attorney Robert M. Talcott was elected president of the Los Angeles Police Commission by his colleagues. Talcott, 52, replaces Northrop Corp. attorney Stephen D. Yslas, 38, as head of the five-member civilian board, which oversees the Police Department. Yslas, president since 1982, will remain a commission member. Barbara L. Schlei, a Century City lawyer, was elected vice president, replacing attorney Samuel L. Williams, 52, who also will remain on the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1985
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday unanimously endorsed Proposition 1, the June 4 ballot measure that would add 1,000 officers to the Police Department through a new property tax assessment. "This proposition is our one real, substantial hope to get a lot more police on the streets," Commission President Stephen D. Yslas said. "We need 1,000 officers just to avoid a Band-Aid approach."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1985 | PATRICIA KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
Carrying placards and singing "We Shall Overcome," nearly 100 representatives of Pacoima religious, civil rights and community groups attended the Los Angeles Police Commission meeting Monday to ask the panel to limit police use of a motorized battering ram that was employed against a suspected drug "rock house." Jose De Sosa, president of the San Fernando Valley chapter of the NAACP, also asked the commission to publicly reprimand Police Chief Daryl F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1985 | ANDY FURILLO, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Police Commission voted Tuesday to revoke the teen dance permit for the Odyssey, a controversial Westside night club that neighbors say has been a source of noise, crime and rowdyism for the last nine years. For years, residents of the neighborhood have complained that teen-agers frequenting the Odyssey--many of whom are as young as 13 and 14--drink alcoholic beverages, consume drugs, make noise and openly urinate and engage in sex outside the club at 8741 Beverly Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1985 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Seventeen years after it investigated the assassination of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, the Los Angeles Police Department was directed Tuesday to make public its confidential 1,500-page summary of the case, but not before editing from it evidence still deemed "sensitive."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1987 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Heeding pleas from Latino activists, the Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday unanimously agreed to increase by one-third the number of Latino recruits entering the Police Academy. In the same vote, the commission also directed Police Chief Daryl F. Gates to adopt a more flexible method to select officers for promotion, but Gates said afterward that he would not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1985
Carrying placards and singing "We Shall Overcome," nearly 100 representatives of Pacoima religious, civil rights and community groups Monday asked the Los Angeles Police Commission to severely limit police use of the motorized battering ram that was used to smash down the wall of a suspected drug-sale house in Pacoima last week. Jose De Sosa, president of the San Fernando Valley chapter of the National Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1987 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Police Chief Daryl F. Gates has tentatively endorsed a recommendation by a citizens advisory group to increase by 33% the number of Latino recruits entering the Los Angeles Police Academy. In a written response to a report to be considered today by the Los Angeles Police Commission, Gates said the increase may be needed if the city's predominantly Anglo police force is to achieve ethnic parity with Los Angeles' growing Latino work force.
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