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Stephen Daldry

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Tony winner and Oscar nominee Stephen Daldry is the new front-runner to direct Universal's screen adaption of the blockbuster musical "Wicked. " The studio and the musical's producer Marc Platt have considered several contenders to head the project, including J.J. Abrams, Rob Marshall, James Mangold and, more recently, "Glee" creator Ryan Murphy. Now the studio is courting Daldry, Deadline.com reported. Daldry has helmed hits for Hollywood and Broadway. He won Tonys for directing "Billy Elliot"  and "An Inspector Calls.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Tony winner and Oscar nominee Stephen Daldry is the new front-runner to direct Universal's screen adaption of the blockbuster musical "Wicked. " The studio and the musical's producer Marc Platt have considered several contenders to head the project, including J.J. Abrams, Rob Marshall, James Mangold and, more recently, "Glee" creator Ryan Murphy. Now the studio is courting Daldry, Deadline.com reported. Daldry has helmed hits for Hollywood and Broadway. He won Tonys for directing "Billy Elliot"  and "An Inspector Calls.
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NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Everyone has their 9/11 story," says Stephen Daldry. "My personal one is not particularly traumatic. " Perhaps not, but it is the beginning of a 10-year period that loops around to the opening of the Daldry-directed "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" in January. Back on Sept. 11, 2001, Daldry and producer Scott Rudin were in a London cutting room together, finishing up "The Hours. " As Daldry recalls, Rudin got a call just after the first plane hit the twin towers. "We went downstairs to the common room and switched to the live footage," Daldry says now. "Whatever work we were doing on 'The Hours' got put on hold.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Everybody has them — waiters, bus drivers, lawyers: a bad day. For a filmmaker with a hundred-strong crew in the wings and millions of dollars on the line, the stakes can be considerably higher when things go off the rails. In this edited excerpt from the third annual Envelope Directors' Roundtable, the filmmakers behind some of this season's most talked about movies — Martin Scorsese ("Hugo"), Michel Hazanavicius ("The Artist"), Alexander Payne ("The Descendants"), George Clooney ("The Ides of March")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
When British director Stephen Daldry first met his cast for "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close," he did not start by asking their thoughts about 9/11, the precipitating event in Jonathan Safran Foer's novel on which the movie is based. He skipped a presentation about how he planned to depict Asperger's syndrome, the disorder affecting 11-year-old protagonist Oskar Schell, or how he intended to shoot New York City, as much a character in the film as anyone in the story. Rather, he asked Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock and newcomer Thomas Horn to cook lunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1994 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
It was the chance of a lifetime. Invited to direct at the prestigious Royal National Theatre, up-and-comer Stephen Daldry could suggest the play of his choice. So what did Daldry choose J.B. Priestley's "An Inspector Calls," a staple of English schools, radio shows and amateur companies. "It is just about the most performed play in England," concedes Daldry. "There are hundreds and hundreds of productions each year." Not like this one.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
"Far Away": Caryl Churchill's apocalyptic shocker, with Laila Kearney and Beth Hogan and directed by Ron Sossi, is a subversive assault on humanity's capacity to ignore its own atrocities. Controversy is synonymous with the ever-audacious Churchill ("Cloud 9," "Fen"). "Far Away's" 2000 Royal Court debut, directed by Stephen Daldry, left London observers cleft between awe and acrimony, and Daldry's 2002 New York Theatre Workshop reading divided the Manhattan cognoscenti.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Thomas Horn, 14, was standing in the middle of a cocktail party populated with adults when director Brett Ratner walked over to the teenager to offer him a congratulatory pat on the shoulder. Days before the late December release of "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" - in which Horn stars as Oskar Schell, a boy struggling to come to grips with the loss of his father, played by Tom Hanks, in the Sept. 11 attacks - he and other cast members were being feted in the lobby of a building that houses the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Film Archive.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | Tom O'Neil
With so many heated races in the derby, let's start by taking the inside track on some of the key races: picture, director, original screenplay, adapted screenplay, animated film, foreign film and costume design. We'll break out the four acting contests next week. BEST PICTURE "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" "Frost/Nixon" "Milk" "The Reader" "Slumdog Millionaire" Spotlight: Very curious race, indeed. "Benjamin Button" has the odds in its favor. The movie with the most nominations has won 15 times during the last 20 years, but then again, three of the eight films that earned 13 noms (just as "Button" did)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2002 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Michael Cunningham's "The Hours" is a superlative piece of fiction, a novelist's novel that became a surprise bestseller and won the Pulitzer Prize. But, paradoxically, the very things that made it so impressive militated against any kind of successful studio film emerging out of its pages. "The Hours" is exquisitely written, graced with a gift for elusive emotions and an effortless ability to delineate interior lives.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Everyone has their 9/11 story," says Stephen Daldry. "My personal one is not particularly traumatic. " Perhaps not, but it is the beginning of a 10-year period that loops around to the opening of the Daldry-directed "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" in January. Back on Sept. 11, 2001, Daldry and producer Scott Rudin were in a London cutting room together, finishing up "The Hours. " As Daldry recalls, Rudin got a call just after the first plane hit the twin towers. "We went downstairs to the common room and switched to the live footage," Daldry says now. "Whatever work we were doing on 'The Hours' got put on hold.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Thomas Horn, 14, was standing in the middle of a cocktail party populated with adults when director Brett Ratner walked over to the teenager to offer him a congratulatory pat on the shoulder. Days before the late December release of "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" - in which Horn stars as Oskar Schell, a boy struggling to come to grips with the loss of his father, played by Tom Hanks, in the Sept. 11 attacks - he and other cast members were being feted in the lobby of a building that houses the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Film Archive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
When British director Stephen Daldry first met his cast for "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close," he did not start by asking their thoughts about 9/11, the precipitating event in Jonathan Safran Foer's novel on which the movie is based. He skipped a presentation about how he planned to depict Asperger's syndrome, the disorder affecting 11-year-old protagonist Oskar Schell, or how he intended to shoot New York City, as much a character in the film as anyone in the story. Rather, he asked Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock and newcomer Thomas Horn to cook lunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2009 | David Ng
A leap of joy is in order for the team behind "Billy Elliot: The Musical," which waltzed away Tuesday with 15 Tony nominations. The stage juggernaut was followed by "Next to Normal," a dark-horse musical about a dysfunctional family that received 11. The announcement of the Tony nominations provided Broadway with a brief respite from a gloomy economic atmosphere that has seen major productions struggling to sell tickets. The 63rd annual Tony Awards ceremony will be held June 7 at Radio City Music Hall and will air on CBS. "Billy Elliot," an import from London based on the popular 2000 movie, received nominations for best musical as well as for composer Elton John, director Stephen Daldry and the three young actors who share the title role of a working-class boy who takes up ballet.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | Tom O'Neil
With so many heated races in the derby, let's start by taking the inside track on some of the key races: picture, director, original screenplay, adapted screenplay, animated film, foreign film and costume design. We'll break out the four acting contests next week. BEST PICTURE "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" "Frost/Nixon" "Milk" "The Reader" "Slumdog Millionaire" Spotlight: Very curious race, indeed. "Benjamin Button" has the odds in its favor. The movie with the most nominations has won 15 times during the last 20 years, but then again, three of the eight films that earned 13 noms (just as "Button" did)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Susan King
DIRECTOR DANNY BOYLE "Slumdog Millionaire" The eclectic British director of Irish Catholic descent receives his first Academy Award nomination in the directing category for his sleeper indie hit about a poverty-stricken teenager in Mumbai who goes on a game show.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2009 | David Ng
A leap of joy is in order for the team behind "Billy Elliot: The Musical," which waltzed away Tuesday with 15 Tony nominations. The stage juggernaut was followed by "Next to Normal," a dark-horse musical about a dysfunctional family that received 11. The announcement of the Tony nominations provided Broadway with a brief respite from a gloomy economic atmosphere that has seen major productions struggling to sell tickets. The 63rd annual Tony Awards ceremony will be held June 7 at Radio City Music Hall and will air on CBS. "Billy Elliot," an import from London based on the popular 2000 movie, received nominations for best musical as well as for composer Elton John, director Stephen Daldry and the three young actors who share the title role of a working-class boy who takes up ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2003 | John Clark, Special to The Times
Hollywood's annual orgy of awards-giving is already upon us, and the two men whose films are early favorites -- "Chicago" director Rob Marshall (eight Golden Globe nominations) and "The Hours" director Stephen Daldry (seven) -- have convened in Manhattan to compare notes and, who knows, to look each other over.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2008 | KENNETH TURAN, MOVIE CRITIC
It is Kate Winslet's face and Kate Winslet's face alone that looks out from the cover of the new "now a major motion picture" paperback edition of Bernhard Schlink's exceptional novel, "The Reader," and that's as it should be. For though "The Reader" costars the gifted Ralph Fiennes and gives a lot of screen time to a young actor named David Kross, it is Winslet's haunting performance that gives the film what success it has.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2008 | John Horn, Horn is a Times staff writer.
The giant-sized, multicolored dancing dresses that play a central role in "Billy Elliot: The Musical" make up the kind of dream sequence that could very quickly fill your nightmares. If anyone has seen way too much of these choreographed mega-costumes, it would be Stephen Daldry, the British director behind both the popular movie and the hit musical that's finally made its way to Broadway.
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