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Stephen Donaldson

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NEWS
May 20, 1994 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was only trying to protest the Vietnam War and follow a creed of nonviolent resistance. But after he was gang-raped 50 times in the Washington, D.C., jail, Stephen Donaldson started a war of his own. It all began on a hot August afternoon in 1973, when he was arrested at a White House pray-in. For reasons of conscience, the Quaker activist refused to post $10 bail and was placed in a cell with other first-time offenders. Then, without warning, he was sent to a wing with hardened criminals.
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NEWS
May 20, 1994 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was only trying to protest the Vietnam War and follow a creed of nonviolent resistance. But after he was gang-raped 50 times in the Washington, D.C., jail, Stephen Donaldson started a war of his own. It all began on a hot August afternoon in 1973, when he was arrested at a White House pray-in. For reasons of conscience, the Quaker activist refused to post $10 bail and was placed in a cell with other first-time offenders. Then, without warning, he was sent to a wing with hardened criminals.
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MAGAZINE
November 3, 2002 | Fred Dickey, Fred Dickey last wrote for the magazine about activist Tammy Bruce.
Bill Handel is a drive-time radio host on L.A.'s KFI-AM (640). He stays popular because he has a feel for what makes his audience chuckle as they head for that unfunny 9 a.m. encounter with the boss. His repertoire includes prison rape jokes, the tired but reliable picking-up-soap-in-the-shower ones, especially when the hapless subject is a celebrated or heinous convict. "When people hear about a victim" of prison rape, Handel explains, the response is: "So he should have stayed out of jail!"
BOOKS
November 20, 1988
BLUEBEARD by Kurt Vonnegut (Dell: $4.95). An Armenian painter has greater success in developing nascent painters' work than his own. He is consoled by a prolific writer of young-adult books and a secret he keeps hidden in a potato barn. FRIED GREEN TOMATOES AT THE WHISTLE STOP CAFE by Fannie Flagg (McGraw-Hill: $5.95).
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court made it somewhat easier Monday for prisoners to win damages if they have been raped behind bars, ruling that prison officials can be held liable if they know an inmate is in clear danger of assault, yet do nothing to prevent it. "Being violently assaulted in prison is simply not part of the penalty that criminal offenders pay for their offenses against society," said Justice David H. Souter for the court.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Donaldson of Newport Beach was first exposed to "the romance of railroading" at 16, when he accompanied a friend on a train trip to Colorado and Wyoming in the '60s. His interest in railroad history continued to grow as an Orange Coast College student two years later when he persuaded his English professor to let him write an assigned theme paper about railroads, which interested him, rather than about literature, which didn't.
BOOKS
February 14, 1988 | Sue Martin, Martin frequently reviews science fiction for The Times
Leaving behind the high-tech world of "Speaker for the Dead" and "Ender's Game," Orson Scott Card has turned to an alternate early America, where William Henry Harrison is an Indian-hating, power-hungry manipulator, Benjamin Franklin is considered a wizard, and folk magic--hexes, "beseechings" and wardings--works. In this second volume of a projected six-book series, Alvin Miller (he has yet to be known as Alvin Maker) is a 10-year-old with a Destiny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1998 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Last week, we dusted off some local freeway history, sharing tales of those paved giants that crisscross Orange County and played such an elemental role in its evolution. Today, we dig a little deeper into a different chapter of local lore to track the on-again, off-again history of rail transit in Orange County.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1988 | ERIC SCHINE, Times Staff Writer
Every weekday at 5:30 a.m., a three-man crew climbs aboard a big blue and yellow Santa Fe locomotive at the Fullerton Depot, revs up the huge 1,750-horsepower diesel engine, blows the whistle and rumbles off for a 14-mile trip to the Irvine Industrial Complex.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | ERIC SCHINE, Schine is a Times business writer.
'They could really pick up speed coming down from the hills . . . when those steam engines came through, the whole town would rock and roll.' One of Dwight Ahern's earliest memories is the roar of a Santa Fe train barreling down the hills and rumbling through the old town of Irvine. Ahern was born in 1912--20 feet from the Santa Fe tracks.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Varley O'Connor joined UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate writing program in the fall of 1986, the New York actress had been writing short stories in her spare time for several years. None of her stories had ever been published, however. "I didn't even try," she says. Writing was something she simply did for her own pleasure. "I was just fortunate in that I didn't know how good UCI was at the time," said O'Connor, who now teaches an advanced fiction workshop at UCI.
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