Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStephen Dunifer
IN THE NEWS

Stephen Dunifer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nerve center of a nationwide and rapidly growing renegade radio broadcasting movement lies here, in the cluttered and dimly lit home of a frail, soft-spoken radio technician. Stephen Dunifer, founder of Free Radio Berkeley, is regarded by many micro-broadcasters as the primary technical and inspirational force behind a movement that is defying the federal government's regulation of the airwaves.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nerve center of a nationwide and rapidly growing renegade radio broadcasting movement lies here, in the cluttered and dimly lit home of a frail, soft-spoken radio technician. Stephen Dunifer, founder of Free Radio Berkeley, is regarded by many micro-broadcasters as the primary technical and inspirational force behind a movement that is defying the federal government's regulation of the airwaves.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
A federal judge allowed the government on Tuesday to shut down "Free Radio Berkeley," run by an unlicensed low-power broadcaster who has fought a five-year guerrilla war against the way federal authorities regulate the airwaves. U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken declined to rule on most of Stephen Dunifer's free-speech challenges to Federal Communications Commission restrictions because Dunifer never applied for an FCC license.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1990 | LANCE IGNON and JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 250 people were arrested Monday during environmental protests on Wall Street and in the financial district of San Francisco. At least 11 people, including seven police officers, received minor injuries. Hundreds of demonstrators converged on the New York Stock Exchange and the Pacific Stock Exchange chanting slogans such as "Wall Street kills," and complaining that corporations had turned Earth Day into a marketing tool without doing enough to protect the environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Freedom fighters of the airwaves? Or freeloaders clogging up the dial? The practitioners of illegal radio broadcasting--so-called "pirate" radio--have one view, the Federal Communications Commission another. But regardless, the phenomenon is growing rapidly across the country, thanks largely to increasing accessibility and affordability of low-wattage transmitting equipment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1996 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn has just published "The Golden Age Is in Us, a Journal, 1987-94" (Verso)
It's an odd thing. People care about what they watch on their television sets, listen to on their radios or download from the Internet. But try to arouse them on the topic of the new communications law now in its final stages in Congress, making everything even more expensive and less democratic, and their eyes film over. The last time Congress addressed major legislation of the communications industry was back in 1934.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As grass-roots revolutionaries go, Michael Taylor was about action more than talk. When it came time to organize rallies in support of imprisoned Philadelphia journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal, sentenced to death for killing a police officer, Taylor led the charge. When someone was needed to appear on a panel about Los Angeles' lethargic community activism, he was the first to volunteer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2009 | Susan Carpenter
"Pirate Radio," the movie, isn't really about pirate radio. It may take place on a boat in England's North Sea in the late '60s, but anyone who goes to see the film hoping to learn about the realities of illegally broadcasting music to millions of idolizing fans from the cold and rocking waters of a ship are likely to be disappointed by everything but the soundtrack. "Pirate Radio" is a comedic coming-of-age story. The station in which that happens is merely a backdrop. Pirate radio, as a concept, has long been a subject of interest among music lovers and subversives who see it as a romantic expression of political rebellion played out in musical form.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the July Fourth weekend, while travelers out of Los Angeles International Airport worried that the Unabomber might make good on his threat to blow up an airplane, a goateed FBI agent showed up at the University of Oregon sociology department with a grand jury subpoena. The agent was seeking an old subscription list for an obscure, left-leaning academic journal called Critical Sociology.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using a car full of high-tech gear to pinpoint a false marine radio distress signal, Charles C. Magin rounded a corner on Maryland's Kent Island one day last month and flashed his federal badge to six dumbfounded teenagers. "So who's been operating the radio?" asked Magin, district director of the Federal Communications Commission's compliance and information bureau in Maryland. Magin extracted a confession from one of the youths, and police and parents were called.
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, Kevin Baxter is a Times staff writer who covers televison and radio
Lyn Gerry's house begins near where the pavement ends on a hilltop overlooking Highland Park. The road is narrow, flanked by leafy green trees and handsome wooden houses. A worn white Honda, dotted with bumper stickers, is parked out front near a jumble of firewood, dozens of empty plastic bottles and a rain-speckled placard that reads, "Bill Clinton = War Criminal." It's a harsh assessment. But then again, in the eyes of the Clinton administration, Gerry is something of a criminal, too.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|