Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStephen F Cooper
IN THE NEWS

Stephen F Cooper

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 2, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Enron Corp., which owes creditors more than $74 billion, said it would seek federal Bankruptcy Court approval for CCE Holdings to buy its U.S. natural gas pipelines for $2.45 billion. The joint venture of Southern Union Co. and General Electric Co. was high bidder, Houston-based Enron said. Court approval for the winning bid will be sought Sept. 9.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 6, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Enron Corp. will pay $5 million in additional severance to employees fired after the former top energy trader filed for bankruptcy protection in December. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Arthur J. Gonzalez approved the payments. The money will be equally divided among about 4,500 former employees who worked at Enron's Houston headquarters. Each will receive about $1,100 before taxes. Fired employees previously received a one-time payment of $4,500 before taxes. Enron interim Chief Executive Stephen F.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Enron Corp. may have overstated the value of its assets and financial contracts by as much as $24 billion late last year, the company said in a regulatory filing Monday. At least part of the overstatement relates to transactions Enron made with a network of private partnerships that hid debt and assets from shareholders by keeping them off the company's books. Enron said its earlier financial results, which it restated Nov. 19, aren't reliable.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2002 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enron Corp. asked a Bankruptcy Court judge Friday for permission to hand out up to $137 million in bonuses and severance payments to remaining employees over the next year. The proposal drew immediate fire from a lawyer representing former employees, who said it is unfair to more than 4,000 fired Enron workers who got about $5,600 each in severance. The proposed retention and severance plan covers about 1,700 employees and could end up costing $47.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2002 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enron Corp. on Friday proposed a strategy for bundling the bulk of its energy generating, exploration and pipeline businesses into a new company that would be split from and run independently of the husk now in Chapter 11 proceedings. Enron's interim chief executive, corporate turnaround specialist Stephen F. Cooper, presented the plan to Enron's official committee of unsecured creditors in a meeting in New York.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2009 | Claudia Eller
The Tuesday ouster of Harry Sloan as chief executive of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. underscores the continued turmoil at the debt-ridden independent studio since it was taken over by private equity owners five years ago. MGM, which is struggling to refinance its $3.7-billion bank loan, will be overseen by a newly created "office of the CEO," composed of production head Mary Parent, Chief Financial Officer Bedi A. Singh and Stephen F. Cooper, a...
BUSINESS
August 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Shares of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two largest U.S. home-loan companies, rose on speculation that the companies' regulator may lift a cap on the amount of home loan assets they can own, helping to ease a funding crunch in the mortgage market. Fannie Mae shares jumped $5.87, or 10%, to $62.50. Freddie Mac rose $4.30, or 7.7%, to $60. Falling home prices and a surge in payment defaults have scared investors away from mortgage debt, including bonds and other securities backed by home loans.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2002 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As 4,500 fired Enron Corp. workers await meager severance payments, the bankrupt energy firm and its creditors are negotiating a new round of "retention bonuses" for the luckier few considered indispensable to keeping Enron running. The new bonus package was expected to be submitted for approval by Judge Arthur J. Gonzalez in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York this week, perhaps as early as today, Enron spokeswoman Karen Denne said.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2002 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enron Corp. won Bankruptcy Court approval Thursday to pay $1.32 million a year to its new chief executive after the Securities and Exchange Commission and a Florida pension plan dropped objections. The job for restructuring specialist Stephen F. Cooper could prove as big as the payday: Piece together a much smaller company that can emerge from Chapter 11 proceedings or find a way to divvy up the paltry leftovers to the satisfaction of creditors.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2002 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Securities and Exchange Commission asked a Bankruptcy Court judge Friday to toss out a proposed $1.32-million employment contract for Enron Corp.'s new acting chief executive, Stephen F. Cooper, as too rich, filled with loopholes and rife with potential conflicts of interest. In a strongly worded court filing, the SEC declared that the terms of Cooper's agreement "cast doubt on the fairness of Enron's handling of its bankruptcy case and on the bankruptcy process as a whole."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|