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Stephen Foster

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1994
Re "When Hard Times Come Again," editorial, Aug. 19: According to Morrison Foster, Stephen Foster's brother, Stephen first heard the melody of this song sung in a Negro church. A maid in the Foster household often took Stephen to church as a child and there "he stored up in his mind many a gem of purest ray serene." Stephen told his brother that these melodies were "too good to be lost" and that he had incorporated them into two of his songs, "Hard Times, Come Again No More" and "Oh!
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2006 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Fletcher Hodges Jr., who as curator of a massive archive spent five decades preserving the memory of composer Stephen Foster, died March 13 at a retirement home in Oakmont, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb. He was 99 and had pneumonia. Hodges had bare musical aptitude when he took over the Foster job in 1931. He was a recent Harvard graduate reduced, during those early Depression years, to sweeping slaughterhouse remains at a Chicago meat-packing plant. One day, he interviewed with Josiah K.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2006 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Fletcher Hodges Jr., who as curator of a massive archive spent five decades preserving the memory of composer Stephen Foster, died March 13 at a retirement home in Oakmont, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb. He was 99 and had pneumonia. Hodges had bare musical aptitude when he took over the Foster job in 1931. He was a recent Harvard graduate reduced, during those early Depression years, to sweeping slaughterhouse remains at a Chicago meat-packing plant. One day, he interviewed with Josiah K.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2004 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
His classic songs grew out of one of the greatest periods of racial and social upheaval in this nation's history and are so embedded in America's musical fabric they can seem more the product of folk tradition than the pen of one man. Yet his name, unlike those of such musical disciples as Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan, often draws more puzzled looks than instant recognition.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2004 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
His classic songs grew out of one of the greatest periods of racial and social upheaval in this nation's history and are so embedded in America's musical fabric they can seem more the product of folk tradition than the pen of one man. Yet his name, unlike those of such musical disciples as Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan, often draws more puzzled looks than instant recognition.
BOOKS
November 9, 1997
Alan Chapman, radio host, teacher: "Doo-Dah: Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture," by Ken Emerson (Simon & Schuster). "Given the familiarity of Foster's songs, it's great to learn more about the man. Emerson places Foster in his social context and gives us an intriguing look at the sources of his lyric ideas." **** Alan Carsrud, economics professor: "Masters of Rome," by Colleen McCullough (Avon).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2002 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where so many musical revues focus on retrospectives of particular composers or genres, "Tintypes" tackles a more expansive theme: the birth of the modern American spirit, as reflected in popular songs from the turn of the 20th century. Exploring that pivotal era through music was a shrewd choice on the part of Mary Kyte, Mel Marvin and Gary Pearle, who created "Tintypes" in 1980.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Barbara's Tombo Combo doubled in size during the last year. Instead of two guys playing acoustic roots music, now it's four guys doing that stuff, only louder, and using a lot of electricity. "I have always been an electric musician," said slide guitar player Tom Murray during a recent interview. "Every blues place is a dance place, and they don't really want to hear acoustic music. And why should we limit ourselves? If you're good, you can back it up. We're a very hard act to follow."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1996
"Dear Friends and Gentle Hearts, the Stephen Foster Story," a new dance musical by Jerry Pearson, will be presented by the Santa Barbara Dance Theatre at the Lobero Theatre in Santa Barbara on Friday at 8 p.m. and next Saturday at 3 and 7 p.m. Seventy local schoolchildren join the professional cast in the production celebrating the life and music of the American composer. Tickets are $10-$15. Reservations: (805) 963-0761.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2002 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where so many musical revues focus on retrospectives of particular composers or genres, "Tintypes" tackles a more expansive theme: the birth of the modern American spirit, as reflected in popular songs from the turn of the 20th century. Exploring that pivotal era through music was a shrewd choice on the part of Mary Kyte, Mel Marvin and Gary Pearle, who created "Tintypes" in 1980.
BOOKS
November 9, 1997
Alan Chapman, radio host, teacher: "Doo-Dah: Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture," by Ken Emerson (Simon & Schuster). "Given the familiarity of Foster's songs, it's great to learn more about the man. Emerson places Foster in his social context and gives us an intriguing look at the sources of his lyric ideas." **** Alan Carsrud, economics professor: "Masters of Rome," by Colleen McCullough (Avon).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1994
Re "When Hard Times Come Again," editorial, Aug. 19: According to Morrison Foster, Stephen Foster's brother, Stephen first heard the melody of this song sung in a Negro church. A maid in the Foster household often took Stephen to church as a child and there "he stored up in his mind many a gem of purest ray serene." Stephen told his brother that these melodies were "too good to be lost" and that he had incorporated them into two of his songs, "Hard Times, Come Again No More" and "Oh!
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Santa Barbara's Tombo Combo doubled in size during the last year. Instead of two guys playing acoustic roots music, now it's four guys doing that stuff, only louder, and using a lot of electricity. "I have always been an electric musician," said slide guitar player Tom Murray during a recent interview. "Every blues place is a dance place, and they don't really want to hear acoustic music. And why should we limit ourselves? If you're good, you can back it up. We're a very hard act to follow."
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