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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
With a ferociously sharp mind tempered by a more forgiving exterior -- those basset hound eyes, that creamy-porridge voice -- British actor/writer/game show host/Twitter impresario Stephen Fry is one of life's guaranteed pleasures; I'd willingly watch him read the phone book. Which, unfortunately, is pretty much what he does in "Doors Open," an adaption of an Ian Rankin thriller of the same name debuting on the Ovation network Saturday night at 8 p.m. Or rather an art catalog; in "Doors Open" Fry plays Robert Gissing, an art professor living in Edinburgh, Scotland, where he delivers lectures, curates the collection of a civic-minded bank and trades auction notes with pal and electronics entrepreneur Mike Mackenzie ("Primeval's" Douglas Henshall)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
With a ferociously sharp mind tempered by a more forgiving exterior -- those basset hound eyes, that creamy-porridge voice -- British actor/writer/game show host/Twitter impresario Stephen Fry is one of life's guaranteed pleasures; I'd willingly watch him read the phone book. Which, unfortunately, is pretty much what he does in "Doors Open," an adaption of an Ian Rankin thriller of the same name debuting on the Ovation network Saturday night at 8 p.m. Or rather an art catalog; in "Doors Open" Fry plays Robert Gissing, an art professor living in Edinburgh, Scotland, where he delivers lectures, curates the collection of a civic-minded bank and trades auction notes with pal and electronics entrepreneur Mike Mackenzie ("Primeval's" Douglas Henshall)
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The term "Renaissance man" gets tossed around too casually to say often without choking, but there are still Brits of accomplishment who can try it on--and it seems a good fit for Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, who separately and together are men of tremendously versatile comedic letters. In America as well as on their native shores, Fry and Laurie are best known for their starring roles in the often hilariously silly "Jeeves & Wooster," a TV adaptation of P.G.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Fry Chronicles -- An Autobiography" Stephen Fry The Overlook Press: 438 pp, $29.95 Actor, writer and British humor icon Stephen Fry would like you to know that he picks his nose and pees in the shower. He also can't stand the sight of his naked body. And in case you were wondering, he's a rotten dancer, a spaz on the athletic field and none too confident in the sack either. It takes a mighty big ego to flaunt these sorts of imperfections, and that's the paradox that makes "The Fry Chronicles" such a chatty delight.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Isay, Jeeves! The chap who wrote this new novel you're reading--he couldn't be that actor fellow, could he? The same Stephen Fry who played you in 'Jeeves and Wooster' on 'Masterpiece Theatre'? Did jolly well at it, too, I must say. Though that Hugh Laurie made me look like a twit." "Quite so, sir." "But I can't help wondering why a chap who excels in one field should feel compelled to sprawl out into another one. Better he minds his own wicket, don't you think, Jeeves? I do hope Mr.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephen Fry, actor and now novelist, has described the brilliant lead character in his book "The Liar" as someone who "dislikes telling the truth." That appraisal is a little off the mark, however, for prep-school provocateur Adrian Healey seems more allergic to the truth than anything else: his constant, extravagant lying is an integral part of his personality, a knee-jerk second nature, a way for Healey to distance himself from the world while mocking it at the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
On a temperamental morning at the Epsom Downs Racecourse 20 miles south of London, Stephen Fry stands wrapped in all-weather gear. The actor, novelist, screenwriter and first-time director is shooting a windblown picnic scene from "Bright Young Things," his adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's 1930 satirical novel "Vile Bodies."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Fry Chronicles -- An Autobiography" Stephen Fry The Overlook Press: 438 pp, $29.95 Actor, writer and British humor icon Stephen Fry would like you to know that he picks his nose and pees in the shower. He also can't stand the sight of his naked body. And in case you were wondering, he's a rotten dancer, a spaz on the athletic field and none too confident in the sack either. It takes a mighty big ego to flaunt these sorts of imperfections, and that's the paradox that makes "The Fry Chronicles" such a chatty delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Early on in Stephen Fry's riotous "Bright Young Things," an angel on the deck of a steamship vomits on a young man's head. The young man is Adam Symes (Stephen Campbell Moore), a penniless but well-connected novelist whose fortunes flip like flapjacks, and whose on-again, off-again fiancee, the lovely and studiously jaded Nina Blount (Emily Mortimer), kindly goes along with the fantastical idea that she'll one day become his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his introduction to the handsome edition of Julian Mitchell's screenplay for "Wilde," British actor Stephen Fry, who plays the title role, writes, "For many years I have known that Oscar Wilde was one of the few major parts I might be lucky enough to be offered." Best known in America as P.G.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Early on in Stephen Fry's riotous "Bright Young Things," an angel on the deck of a steamship vomits on a young man's head. The young man is Adam Symes (Stephen Campbell Moore), a penniless but well-connected novelist whose fortunes flip like flapjacks, and whose on-again, off-again fiancee, the lovely and studiously jaded Nina Blount (Emily Mortimer), kindly goes along with the fantastical idea that she'll one day become his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
On a temperamental morning at the Epsom Downs Racecourse 20 miles south of London, Stephen Fry stands wrapped in all-weather gear. The actor, novelist, screenwriter and first-time director is shooting a windblown picnic scene from "Bright Young Things," his adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's 1930 satirical novel "Vile Bodies."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his introduction to the handsome edition of Julian Mitchell's screenplay for "Wilde," British actor Stephen Fry, who plays the title role, writes, "For many years I have known that Oscar Wilde was one of the few major parts I might be lucky enough to be offered." Best known in America as P.G.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Isay, Jeeves! The chap who wrote this new novel you're reading--he couldn't be that actor fellow, could he? The same Stephen Fry who played you in 'Jeeves and Wooster' on 'Masterpiece Theatre'? Did jolly well at it, too, I must say. Though that Hugh Laurie made me look like a twit." "Quite so, sir." "But I can't help wondering why a chap who excels in one field should feel compelled to sprawl out into another one. Better he minds his own wicket, don't you think, Jeeves? I do hope Mr.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | JESSICA TEICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Gia Carangi was a child, she would get lost in department stores just to hear her name announced over the loudspeakers. Later, as supermodel "Gia," she disappeared altogether, a casualty of the hard drugs and fast company that attend life under the strobe.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stephen Fry, actor and now novelist, has described the brilliant lead character in his book "The Liar" as someone who "dislikes telling the truth." That appraisal is a little off the mark, however, for prep-school provocateur Adrian Healey seems more allergic to the truth than anything else: his constant, extravagant lying is an integral part of his personality, a knee-jerk second nature, a way for Healey to distance himself from the world while mocking it at the same time.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | JESSICA TEICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Gia Carangi was a child, she would get lost in department stores just to hear her name announced over the loudspeakers. Later, as supermodel "Gia," she disappeared altogether, a casualty of the hard drugs and fast company that attend life under the strobe.
NEWS
November 3, 2005 | Chris Pasles
Kenneth Branagh will direct a film version of Mozart's "The Magic Flute," the BBC reports. James Conlon, who becomes music director for the Los Angeles Opera in 2006-07, will conduct the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Filming will begin in January at London's Shepperton Studios. Stephen Fry, who collaborated with Branagh on the 1992 Branagh-directed film "Peter's Friends," wrote the libretto, transferring the setting to World War I.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The term "Renaissance man" gets tossed around too casually to say often without choking, but there are still Brits of accomplishment who can try it on--and it seems a good fit for Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, who separately and together are men of tremendously versatile comedic letters. In America as well as on their native shores, Fry and Laurie are best known for their starring roles in the often hilariously silly "Jeeves & Wooster," a TV adaptation of P.G.
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